NEW Opioid Overdose Response Training to Empower High School Students to Help Save Lives Including Nasal Naloxone Spray

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is launching the NEW Opioids Overdose Response Training as an enhancement to its successful High School cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and automated external defibrillator (AED) Program, FREE for high schools across Canada.

The training will teach students:

-What are opioids and how do   opioid overdoses happen
-What is Naloxone and how does it work
-Recognizing a suspected opioid overdose
-Responding to a suspected opioid overdose including calling 911
quickly, performing CPR if needed and giving nasal Naloxone spray

“The landscape of emergency response is changing in Canada due to the increase of opioid overdoses and we all have a role to play,” says Sandra Clarke, the ACT Foundation’s Executive Director. “Enhancing ACT’s High School CPR and AED Program with opioid awareness and response training is a next step in empowering youth to respond to life-threatening emergencies. This new program will see teachers training hundreds of thousands of students in how to respond to opioid-associated emergencies.”

The Public Health Agency of Canada reports that over 5,368 apparent opioid toxicity deaths occurred from January–September 2021. The majority (94%) of opioid overdose deaths happen by accident.  Young Canadians aged 15 to 24 are the fastest-growing population requiring hospital care from opioid overdoses.[1] ACT has received a contribution from Health Canada’s Substance Use and Addictions Program (SUAP) in support of the development and implementation of the module on Opioids Overdose Response Training.

“All corners of the country have felt the tragic consequences of the overdose crisis, which continues to affect individuals, families, and communities every day. The timely use of Naloxone for those experiencing an overdose can be life saving. To the ACT Foundation and all those who continue to make opioid overdose training available, and to the many people who are choosing to learn valuable skills that could save lives, we thank you,” says Minister of Mental Health and Addictions and Associate Minister of Health (Health Canada), Hon. Carolyn Bennett.

The opioid-associated emergency module enables teachers (Train the Trainer model) to provide the theory portion of the education in an eLearning format to students as a self-paced learning tool. Teachers will then provide the practical training portion to their students in the classroom.

“The new module was developed based on a successful Ottawa pilot in 2019. Results from the pilot were extremely positive with strong interest and enthusiasm expressed by teachers and students,” says Dr. Michael Austin, ACT’s National Medical Director. “The opioid crisis is a complex issue and causes many of the opioid-related harms and deaths. ACT’s response to this crisis empowers high school teachers to add the Opioid Overdose Response Training to the current CPR training, enhancing students’ lifesaving toolbox. Recognizing a suspected opioid overdose and knowing how to respond can help save lives.”

Infographic: ACT High School Opioid Overdose Response Training

ACT’s overall goal is to see every high school student across Canada graduate with the skills and knowledge to save a life. To help achieve this goal, ACT receives the financial support from private and public organizations who believe in the positive impact ACT can play in Canada’s society.

“As a long-standing partner of the ACT Foundation, we’re proud of the impact they have had around CPR and AED education across the country – and are excited to see them enhance their program to include opioid awareness and overdose response training, an increasingly growing issue among today’s youth,” says Kiersten Combs, President, AstraZeneca Canada. “Empowering youth with these critical life-saving skills is incredibly important to helping save lives.”

“We applaud the efforts of the ACT Foundation as a pioneer in establishing free lifesaving training in high schools. It is an honour to participate as a National Health Partner, realizing CPR and AED training in over 1,800 high schools to date,” mentions Dr. Suna Avcil, Executive Medical Director, Amgen Canada.

About the ACT Foundation

The ACT Foundation is the national charitable organization establishing free CPR and AED training in Canadian high schools. The program is built on ACT’s award-winning community-based model of partnerships and support, whereby ACT finds local partners who donate the mannequins and AED training units that schools need to deliver the program. High school teachers are trained to then teach lifesaving skills to their students as a regular part of the curriculum, reaching all youth prior to graduation. The ACT High School CPR and AED Program is made possible with the support of its national health partners, AstraZeneca Canada and Amgen Canada. The ACT Foundation gratefully acknowledges the contribution of Health Canada’s Substance Use and Addictions Program (SUAP) for the ACT Opioid Overdose Response Training program.

Website: actfoundation.ca
Twitter: @actfoundation #ACT2Save
Facebook: @theactfoundation
Instagram: @actfoundation
YouTube: YouTube.com/theactfoundation

For more information about the ACT Foundation and the ACT Opioid Overdose Response Training contact:

Christian Ahuet
Senior Consultant
National Public Relations
cahuet@national.ca
Tel: 514-994-7496

Cristiane Doherty
Communications Manager
ACT Foundation
Cell: 613-799-927
cdoherty@actfoundation.ca

[1] https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/publications/healthy-living/canada-opioid-crisis-fact-sheet.html

Basketball coach saves student with CPR and an AED

A Grade 10 student is alive today thanks to the quick provision of CPR and the use of an AED by his basketball coach Mike Rowley, of St. Mother Teresa High School. Since 1994, the ACT Foundation has established free High School CPR and AED training Program in over 1,800 high schools across Canada.

Zachary Legault, ‘Zach’ as his friends call him, is an energetic student who loves sports. But at this school year’s basketball tryout – Zach’s heart stopped.

“I was adding names to my team shortlist when I saw a student come off the court hunched over,” says Coach Mike. “It was Zach, and he was gasping for air.” Suddenly Zach collapsed face-first on the floor sending an echoing thud across the gym. “My instincts kicked in. It was the ACT training,” says Mike, who told his Assistant Coach, Yvan, to call 911.

Coach Mike quickly assessed that Zach was unresponsive and not breathing. He began CPR and using the school’s AED, saved his student’s life.

“I can tell you as a mom, receiving the phone call was nothing short of traumatic.  But to hear over and over in the days that followed from paramedics, ER physicians, and the team of cardiologists, that had the coach not responded so quickly performing CPR and using the AED, Zach would not be with us today,” says Stephanie Muldoon, Zach’s mother.

Zach underwent open-heart surgery at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) to fix a previously unknown heart defect he has had since birth. Zach has made a full recovery.

Zach would like to see everyone empowered to save a life. “It can happen to a family member, a friend, it can happen to anyone around you. You wouldn’t expect a young athlete to have a cardiac arrest, but I’m an example of what can happen,” says Zach.

ACT RESCUE VIDEO: Zach’s Story

“The ACT Foundation coordinates the training of thousands of teachers enabling them to train hundreds of thousands of students across Canada every year in lifesaving skills,” says Sandra Clarke, the Foundation’s Executive Director.

“ACT set up the High School CPR Program at St. Mother Teresa High School in 1998, adding the AED training program for students in 2009.”

To date, 8,300 teachers across Canada are trained as CPR instructors for their students and 4.8 million students have learned how to save a life through the ACT High School CPR and Defibrillator Program. Many lives have been saved.

Partner and Community Quotes

AstraZeneca Canada, ACT National Health Partner
Kiersten Combs, President of AstraZeneca Canada
We’re proud to be a long-standing partner of the ACT Foundation – supporting its goal of establishing CPR and defibrillator training in Canadian high schools, providing youth with critical life-saving skills, and raising awareness of the importance of cardiovascular health,” says Kiersten Combs, President of AstraZeneca Canada. “Stories like Zach’s and the quick thinking of his coach Mike Rowley are a great reminder of the impact that initiatives like the ACT High School CPR Program can have by empowering teachers and students to help save lives.”

Amgen Canada, ACT National Health Partner
Dr. Suna Avcil, Executive Medical Director of Amgen Canada
“Amgen is honoured to support the ACT Foundation as a National Health Partner,” says Dr. Suna Avcil, Executive Medical Director of Amgen Canada. “Rescue stories are a testament to the quality of the program and the criticality of ensuring that the education community is equipped with the knowledge and skills to contribute. Together we will continue to advance excellence in science literacy, inspire the next generation, help educators to teach more effectively, and improve access to resources for teachers, students, and society at large.”

Hydro One, ACT Provincial Partner, Ontario
Jay Armitage, Vice President, Marketing & Communications, Hydro One
“We would like to commend Coach Mike for his quick instinct to put his first aid training into action. This real-life rescue demonstrates the importance of equipping young people and their teachers with the lifesaving skills necessary to build safe communities,” said Jay Armitage, Vice President, Marketing & Communications, Hydro One. “Thanks to his CPR and AED training received through the program, Coach Mike had the invaluable tools needed to act fast and save a life.”

Ottawa Catholic School Board, Participating School Board
Tom D’Amico, Director of Education, Ottawa Catholic School Board
“I’m proud of the actions by Coach Mike Rowley. Teachers enter the profession to make a difference in the lives of youth, and in this situation, thanks to his training and the availability of an AED in the school, he was able to save the life of a student athlete.”

About The ACT Foundation

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is the national charitable organization establishing free CPR in Canadian high schools. The program is built on ACT’s award-winning community-based model of partnerships and support, whereby ACT finds local partners who donate the mannequins and AED training units that schools need to deliver the program. High school teachers are trained to teach their students lifesaving skills as a regular part of the curriculum, reaching all youth before graduation. More than 4.8 million youth have been trained in CPR by their teachers through this lifesaving program to date.

The ACT High School CPR and AED Program is made possible with the support of its National Health Partners AstraZeneca Canada and Amgen Canada and its provincial partner Hydro One.

Website:           actfoundation.ca
Twitter:            @actfoundation #ACT2Save
Facebook:        @theactfoundation
Instagram:       @actfoundation
YouTube:          YouTube.com/theactfoundation

The ACT Foundation
Cristiane Doherty, Communications Manager
Mobile: 613-799-9277
cdoherty@actfoundation.ca

 

ACT Foundation recognizes Amgen Canada with Community Champion Award

The ACT Foundation is proud to present Amgen Canada with ACT’s Community Champion Award in celebration of Amgen’s 5-year anniversary as a National Health Partner to the Foundation. ACT is honoured to bestow this award to a National Health Partner for assisting the Foundation as it strives to reach its goal that would see every Canadian high school student graduate with the skills and knowledge to save a life.

Through the work of the ACT Foundation in establishing free CPR training programs in Canadian high schools, more than 4.8 million students have been trained by their teachers to date, and many are saving lives in their communities.

In Canada, an estimated 35,000 people suffer out-of-hospital cardiac arrests each year. With 80 per cent of cardiac arrests occurring in homes and public places, empowering youth with CPR training as part of their high school education will help increase citizen CPR response rates and save lives.

“CPR is an essential life skill for all Canadians,” says Dr. Justin Maloney, an emergency physician at the Ottawa Hospital and ACT Foundation’s National Medical Director. “We are grateful for Amgen Canada’s continued support in helping the ACT Foundation bring this lifesaving program into Canadian high schools.”

Through the ACT High School CPR Program, students learn about the 4 ‘Rs’ of CPR. This includes Risk factor education on heart disease and stroke; how to Recognize a developing medical emergency like a heart attack, a cardiac arrest, or stroke; how to React including the importance of calling 911 and what to do until the ambulance arrives; and Resuscitate – CPR and how to use an AED. The program promotes students’ interest in science and health that can lead to enhanced career opportunities and help build Canadian innovation.

“Amgen is honoured to support the ACT Foundation for eight years to date and five years as a national health partner,” says Brian Heath, President of Amgen Canada. “The successful delivery of programs like this require collaboration. It is everyone’s responsibility to develop Canadian youth to be national and global citizens, equipped with the knowledge and skills to contribute meaningfully through their actions and behaviours. Together we take collective action to bridge the gap for Canadian students and help them make the connection between their interests and the value they can bring beyond the classroom.”

“We are proud to present the ACT Community Champion Award to Amgen Canada, whose support is so important to the ACT Foundation’s success in saving lives. We have made great strides with the support of our National Health Partners, along with our government, health, education, and community partners,” says Sandra Clarke, Executive Director and Founder of the ACT Foundation. “It is a wonderful example of a successful partnership between government, corporate citizens, a charitable foundation, and the community affecting positive change where we live, work, and play. By working together, we are making our communities healthier.”

About The ACT Foundation
The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is the national charitable organization establishing free CPR in Canadian high schools. The program is built on ACT’s award-winning community-based model of partnerships and support, whereby ACT finds local partners who donate the mannequins and AED training units that schools need to deliver the program. High school teachers are trained to then teach lifesaving skills to their students as a regular part of the curriculum, reaching all youth prior to graduation.

The ACT High School CPR and AED Program is made possible with the support of its National Health Partners Amgen Canada and AstraZeneca Canada.

Website: actfoundation.ca
Twitter: @actfoundation #ACT2Save
Facebook: @theactfoundation
Instagram: @actfoundation
YouTube: YouTube.com/theactfoundation

Contacts:

The ACT Foundation
Cristiane Doherty
Communications Manager
Mobile: 613-799-9277
cdoherty@actfoundation.ca

Amgen Canada
Natasha Bond
Corporate Affairs
Office: 905-285-3007
Mobile: 416-801-4459
natasha.bond@amgen.com

ACT Foundation launches eLearning for High School CPR and AED Program

Ottawa, ON June 3, 2021 – Today, the Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation announced the launch of its NEW eLearning program. This important resource will support schools in teaching 350,000 students across Canada, including 160,000 students in Ontario, in the ACT High School CPR and AED Program in each year. Its development was made possible with donations from Amgen Canada and Hydro One.

In response to meeting the needs of teachers, ACT created this eLearning resource for convenient instruction of the theory portion of the ACT High School CPR and AED Program. This includes the first three ‘Rs’: Risk factors for heart disease and stroke and the importance of a heart healthy lifestyle; how to Recognize the signs of a heart attack, stroke and other developing emergency; and how to React, including calling 911 quickly. It will introduce students to the fourth ‘R’ – Resuscitate, in preparation for hands-on CPR and AED skills training they will receive in school with their teachers.

“Together with our partners, we are making communities healthier. This new self-directed eLearning program helps young people engage and learn about leading a healthy lifestyle,” said Brian Heath, Vice President and General Manager, Amgen Canada. “They will become champions for health and science in their families and their communities.”

“Since 2000, our long-standing partnership with the ACT Foundation has successfully trained more than two million high school students in CPR and made a lasting difference,” said Lyla Garzouzi, Chief Safety Officer, Hydro One. “We’re proud to help the ACT Foundation adapt to the virtual environment and continue to provide students with critical life-saving skills to help build safe communities.”

The eLearning program will support the ACT Foundation’s goal of seeing every high school student across Canada graduate with the skills and knowledge to save lives.

Access the ACT High School CPR and AED eLearning Program

“Our approach is to teach confidence. With this eLearning resource, students will be familiar with CPR before they get their hands on training in the classroom,” said Dr. Justin Maloney, National Medical Director and Chair, ACT Foundation.

“The program was very easy to navigate, and I could learn at my own pace, which really helped me thoroughly understand each module,” said Ottawa Catholic School Board high school student, who has just completed the eLearning program.

Designed for schools, “it is engaging, easy to follow and to work through at your own pace. It is set up in a way that teachers can guide students through each module successfully with ease, enabling them to learn and discover the key components of CPR,” said Jeff Boucher, Department Head of Physical Education and Athletic Director, St. Francis Xavier Catholic High School. “It’s a great educational resource with the most pertinent information highlighted, and the material organized neatly in the same manner as my lesson plans are designed.”

The modules are based on the established ACT High School CPR and AED Program and will support the 1,800 high schools across Canada where ACT has already set up the CPR and AED Program, having donated more than 50,000 mannequins and trained 7,000 teachers as Instructors. This was done with the support of ACT’s national health partners AstraZeneca Canada and Amgen Canada, and Ontario provincial partner Hydro One.

“Together with our partners, we are making communities healthier and safer,” said Sandra Clarke, the ACT Foundation’s Executive Director.

About The ACT Foundation
The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is the national charitable organization establishing free CPR and AED training in Canadian high schools. The program is built on ACT’s award-winning community-based model of partnerships and support, whereby ACT finds local partners who donate the mannequins and AED training units that schools need to deliver the program. High school teachers are trained to then teach lifesaving skills to their students as a regular part of the curriculum, reaching all youth prior to graduation.

The ACT High School CPR and AED Program is made possible with the support of its national health partners AstraZeneca Canada and Amgen Canada, and ACT’s Ontario provincial partner Hydro One.

Website: actfoundation.ca
Twitter: @actfoundation #ACT2Save
Facebook: @theactfoundation
Instagram: @actfoundation
YouTube: YouTube.com/theactfoundation

Contacts
The ACT Foundation
Cristiane Doherty
Communications Manager
Mobile: 613-799-9277
cdoherty@actfoundation.ca

Amgen Canada
Natasha Bond
Corporate Affairs
Office: 905-285-3007
Mobile: 416-801-4459
natasha.bond@amgen.com

Hydro One
Media Relations
24 hours a day
1-877-506-7584
(toll-free in Ontario only)
416-345-6868

 

ACT Foundation enhancing high school CPR training with opioid awareness and overdose response training

(Ottawa, ON, March 29, 2021) The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation announced today it is enhancing the ACT High School CPR and AED Program with an Opioids Overdose Response Training Module.

Support through a contribution from Health Canada’s Substance Use and Addictions Program (SUAP) will enable the ACT Foundation to expand its Ottawa pilot of the opioids awareness and response training to hundreds of high schools across Canada, empowering thousands of students every year.

The ACT High School CPR and AED Program is well established in high schools across the country. Enhancing the program with opioids awareness and response training is a natural next step in equipping youth to respond to life threatening emergencies they may encounter. Knowing the signs and symptoms of an opioid overdose and how to respond can help save lives.

The opioids module will follow ACT’s CPR program delivery model. High school teachers will be trained to teach students to recognize the signs of an opioids overdose, the importance of calling 911 quickly, and how to respond with the use of Naloxone nasal spray, and perform CPR when necessary.

“ACT has successfully delivered the High School CPR and AED Program in high schools across Canada. It is a natural progression to add opioid overdose response training,” says Dr. Justin Maloney, National Medical Director and Chair, ACT Foundation. “We want to empower students and teachers by adding to their lifesaving toolbox.”

“We are really pleased to receive support from Health Canada, enabling the ACT Foundation to expand the opioids overdose response training to thousands of young Canadians through the school program,” says Sandra Clarke, the ACT Foundation’s Executive Director. “This is what ACT does. We empower high school students to save lives.”

The ACT Foundation

The ACT Foundation is the national charitable organization establishing free CPR and AED training in Canadian high schools. The program is built on ACT’s award-winning community-based model of partnerships and support, whereby ACT finds local partners who donate the mannequins and AED training units that schools need to deliver the program. High school teachers are trained to then teach lifesaving skills to their students as a regular part of the curriculum, reaching all youth prior to graduation. The ACT High School CPR and AED Program is made possible with the support of its national partners AstraZeneca Canada and Amgen Canada. The ACT Foundation gratefully acknowledges the financial support of Health Canada for the ACT Opioid Overdose Response Training implementation.

Website: actfoundation.ca
Twitter: @actfoundation #ACT2Save
Facebook: @theactfoundation
Instagram: @actfoundation
YouTube: YouTube.com/theactfoundation

For more information about the ACT Foundation and the ACT Opioid Overdose Response Training contact:

Cristiane Doherty
Communications Manager
The ACT Foundation
cdoherty@actfoundation.ca
Cell: 613-799-9277

Hydro One partners with ACT Foundation to provide critical lifesaving skills to 110,000 students across Ontario

With 80 per cent of cardiac arrests occurring at home, early CPR can increase survival rates

TORONTO, December 4, 2020 – The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation in partnership with Hydro One’s support continues to provide students with the skills necessary to save a life. This year, the provincial collaboration is expected to bring these critical skills to more than 110,000 students and to more rural and First Nations schools. During the time of school closures resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic, the ACT Foundation quickly transitioned to provide schools with access to course theory information online, including the warning signs of a heart attack and stroke and the importance of calling 911 early. The practical CPR hand-on skills training has now resumed for students back in school.

Through the program, high school students are trained in CPR and Automated External Defibrillator (AED) skills, which according to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, when combined early in a life-threatening situation can double the chance of survival. Since 2000, Hydro One has supported the ACT Foundation to successfully train more than two million high school students in CPR.

“The value of lifesaving skills cannot be measured, which is why we ensure our employees are properly trained to respond to medical emergencies that could occur in the workplace, at home or in public,” said Lyla Garzouzi, Chief Safety Officer, Hydro One. “By partnering with the ACT Foundation, we are equipping young people with the skills necessary to act fast and make a lasting difference. Education and training are essential in saving lives and building safe communities.”

In Canada, an estimated 35,000 people suffer out-of-hospital cardiac arrests each year. With 80 per cent of cardiac arrests occurring in homes, empowering youth with CPR training as part of their high school education will help increase citizen CPR response rates and save lives.

“As a national health partner with the ACT Foundation, Amgen Canada is proud to help students learn life-saving skills for life-threatening emergencies, but more importantly, to become champions for health and science in their families and communities,” says Brian Heath, Vice-President and General Manager at Amgen Canada. “We strongly believe in the power of young people to inspire wellness.”

“We are thrilled with the commitment of ACT’s partners,” says ACT Foundation Executive Director Sandra Clarke. “Their support is helping the ACT Foundation enable thousands of students across the province to be emergency ready to respond to serious medical emergencies that can happen to their family members, friends, neighbors and others in their communities.”

ACT’s partners, committed to bringing the program to Ontario are the Government of Ontario and Hydro One and ACT’s national health partners AstraZeneca Canada and Amgen Canada.

The ACT Foundation’s mission is to promote health and empower citizens to save lives! ACT is doing so by establishing the CPR and AED Program in high schools across Canada. The Foundation’s High School CPR and Defibrillator Training Program is built on ACT’s award-winning community-based model of partnerships and support. ACT raises funds for CPR mannequins and AED training units for all high schools, trains teachers as CPR instructors for their students, and guides schools in program set up.

About the ACT Foundation

The ACT Foundation is the national charitable organization establishing the free CPR and AED program in Canadian high schools. The program is built on ACT’s award-winning community-based model of partnerships and support, whereby ACT finds local partners who donate the mannequins and AED training units that schools need to set up the program. High school teachers then teach CPR and how to use a defibrillator to their students as a regular part of the curriculum, reaching all youth prior to graduation. ACT’s partners, committed to bringing the program to Ontario are the Government of Ontario and Hydro one and our national health partners AstraZeneca Canada and Amgen Canada. or on Twitter @actfoundation #ACT2Save

About Hydro One Inc.

Hydro One Limited (TSX: H)

Hydro One Limited, through its wholly-owned subsidiaries, is Ontario’s largest electricity transmission and distribution provider with approximately 1.4 million valued customers, approximately $27.1 billion in assets as at December 31, 2019, and annual revenues in 2019 of approximately $6.5 billion. Our team of approximately 8,800 skilled and dedicated employees proudly build and maintain a safe and reliable electricity system which is essential to supporting strong and successful communities. In 2019, Hydro One invested approximately $1.7 billion in its transmission and distribution networks and supported the economy through buying approximately $1.5 billion of goods and services. We are committed to the communities where we live and work through community investment, sustainability and diversity initiatives. We are designated as a Sustainable Electricity Company by the Canadian Electricity Association. Hydro One Limited’s common shares are listed on the TSX and certain of Hydro One Inc.’s medium term notes are listed on the NYSE. Additional information can be accessed at www.hydroone.com; www.sedar.com or www.sec.gov.

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ACT Foundation CPR in Schools’ Champion Honored with 40 Under 40 Award

Ottawa, ON – The ACT Foundation is proud to announce that CPR in schools’ champion, ACT’s Director of Operations, Jennifer Edwards is the recipient the Citizen CPR Foundation’s inaugural 40 Under 40 Award. This Award recognizes outstanding individuals who are burgeoning leaders committed to strengthening survival from sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) through training, response and advocacy.

Announcing this prestigious achievement during Heart Month underscores why Mrs. Edwards is a recipient.

“Jennifer’s outstanding commitment and passion for saving lives from sudden cardiac arrest, coupled with her incredible professionalism, expertise, skills and talent has seen her play a major role in the establishment of the ACT High School CPR and Defibrillator Program in over 1,800 high schools across Canada resulting in more than 4.6 million youth empowered to save lives,” says Sandra Clarke, Executive Director, ACT Foundation. “The future of sudden cardiac arrest survival lies in the hands of today’s emerging leaders like Jennifer.”

Ms. Edward’s commitment to citizen CPR training has also motivated her to become a certified CPR and AED Instructor and travel to many Canadian rural, remote and First Nation communities to deliver the CPR and AED training herself to youth to ensure they have the same opportunities for this lifesaving training as their urban peers.

“It is both humbling and an honour to receive this award,” says Jennifer Edwards, Director of Operations, ACT Foundation. “The ACT Program teaches youth lifesaving skills and instills in them the confidence and leadership to act in emergencies. I am continually inspired by the many lives being saved by youth across the country and I am so proud to be a part of making this happen.”

To read some of the stories of lives saved thanks to the ACT High School CPR Program, please visit: https://actfoundation.ca/act-rescues/stories/

ACT Foundation The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is an award-winning national charitable organization that is establishing free CPR and AED training program in Canadian high schools. The program is built on ACT’s community-based model of partnerships and support, where ACT finds the funds to donate mannequins and AED training units that schools need to set up the program. ACT trains high school teachers to teach CPR and how to use a defibrillator to their students, reaching all youth prior to graduation. ACT’s health partners who are committed to bringing the program to communities across Canada are AstraZeneca Canada, and Amgen Canada. www.actfoundation.ca or on Twitter @actfoundation #ACT2Save

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For further information and interview opportunities, please contact: Amanda Borris
Communications Coordinator,
ACT Foundation
aborris@actfoundation.ca
Tel: 613-729-3455
Toll: 800-465-9111
www.actfoundation.ca / Twitter.com/ACTfoundation Facebook/theACTfoundation / Instagram.com/theACTfoundation / YouTube.com/theACTfoundation

4,000 Peterborough students receive lifesaving CPR and defibrillator training during CPR month

Peterborough, ON – November 29, 2019 –To mark CPR Month, today the Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation and partners, launched the ACT High School CPR and Defibrillator Training Program in 18 Peterborough and area high schools. This will see more than 4,000 students empowered by their teachers with essential lifesaving skills every year. The ACT Foundation is a national charitable organization dedicated to establishing CPR and defibrillation training in every Canadian high school. Since 2000, longtime provincial partner Hydro One has provided support to the ACT Foundation to bring safety training to students across the province, including in the Peterborough area.

ACT is working in partnership with its provincial partners, Government of Ontario, Hydro One and community partners Brighton Kinsmen Club, Kinsmen Club of Campbellford, Lions Club of Brighton, Lions Club of Cobourg, Ontario Power Generation, Peterborough Lions Club and Rotary Club of Port Hope, and health partners AstraZeneca Canada, Sanofi Canada, and Amgen Canada to bring this program to the high schools in the Peterborough area.

Funding will see high schools receive training equipment to enable teachers to train students. This includes Automated External Defibrillator (AED) training units, training mannequins, and program set-up that will see all students graduate with the skills and knowledge to save lives. With eight in 10 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occurring at home or in public places, empowering youth with CPR training as part of their high school education will help increase citizen CPR response rates over the long term.

“I want to thank the ACT Foundation and its partners for their incredible work on this initiative. It is important that our youth be taught the skills needed for situations where they need to act quickly to save a life. I am pleased that over 4,000 students in our community will be taught CPR and how to use defibrillator in our schools every year,” said Dave Smith, MPP for Peterborough-Kawartha.

“Safety is at our core at Hydro One. We are proud to play a role in building safe communities by extending safety training beyond the workplace,” said Daniel Levitan, Director of External Relations, Hydro One. “In partnering with the ACT Foundation, we are teaching high school students across Peterborough how to save a life. These critical skills will help a young person know how to act quickly when a neighbour, a friend or someone they love is in distress.”

“As a national health partner with the ACT Foundation, Amgen Canada is proud to help students learn lifesaving skills for life-threatening emergencies, but more importantly, to become champions for health and science in their families and communities,” says Brian Heath, Vice-President and General Manager at Amgen Canada. “We strongly believe in the power of young people to inspire wellness.”

“We are thrilled with the commitment of ACT’s partners,” says ACT Foundation Executive Director Sandra Clarke. “Their support is helping the ACT Foundation enable thousands of students across the province to

be emergency ready to respond to serious medical emergencies that can happen to their family members, friends, neighbors and others in their communities.”

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About the ACT Foundation

The ACT Foundation is the national charitable organization establishing the free CPR and AED program in Canadian high schools. The program is built on ACT’s award-winning community-based model of partnerships and support, whereby ACT finds local partners who donate the mannequins and AED training units that schools need to set up the program. High school teachers then teach CPR and how to use a defibrillator to their students as a regular part of the curriculum, reaching all youth prior to graduation. ACT’s partners, committed to bringing the program to Ontario are the Government of Ontario and Hydro one and our national health partners AstraZeneca Canada, Sanofi Canada, and Amgen Canada. www.actfoundation.ca or on Twitter @actfoundation #ACT2Save

About Hydro One Inc.:
Hydro One Inc. is a fully owned subsidiary of Hydro One Limited, Ontario’s largest electricity transmission and distribution provider with almost 1.4 million valued customers, over $25.6 billion in assets and 2018 annual revenues of over $6.1 billion. Our team of approximately 8,600 skilled and dedicated employees proudly build and maintain a safe and reliable electricity system which is essential to supporting strong and successful communities. In 2018, Hydro One invested almost $1.6 billion in its 30,000 circuit kilometres of high-voltage transmission and 123,000 circuit kilometres of primary distribution networks and injected approximately $1.3 billion into the economy by buying goods and services in Ontario. We are committed to the communities where we live and work through community investment, sustainability and diversity initiatives. We are designated as a Sustainable Electricity Company by the Canadian Electricity Association. Hydro One Limited’s common shares are listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange (TSX: H).

For further information: Hydro One Media Relations 24 hours a day at 1-877-506-7584 (toll-free in Ontario only) or 416-345-6868; Our website is www.HydroOne.com; Follow us on facebook.com/hydrooneofficial, twitter.com/hydroone and instagram.com/hydrooneofficial

For photo opportunities or media interviews and information:

Jennifer Edwards
Director of Operations
ACT Foundation
jedwards@actfoundation.ca
Tel: (613) 286-5260
Toll: (800) 465-9111

Richard Francella
Media Relations and Communications
Hydro One Inc.
Richard.francella@hydroone.com
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68,000 Quebec high school students will be empowered to save lives as they learn how to use an AED in addition to CPR training

Montreal (QUEBEC), November 22, 2019– The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation announced the completion of its fundraising campaign to ensure an automated external defibrillator (AED) for all public high schools in Quebec. In addition, ACT confirmed that every year 68,000 students throughout the province will learn how to use an AED combined with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training to save lives. The event was attended by Danielle McCann, Quebec Health and Social Services Minister, Isabelle Charest, Deputy Minister for Education, and representatives from the public and private sectors.

The ACT Foundation is working in partnership with the Ministry of Health and Social Services and the Ministry of Education and Higher Education to establish high school student CPR and AED training programs throughout the province since 2006. The program sees high schools receive training equipment to enable teachers to train students. This includes AED training units, CPR and AED training mannequins, and program set-up that will see all secondary 3 students empowered with the skills and knowledge to save lives. “When a cardiac arrest occurs, taking action quickly is critical to their chances of survival. Having access to an automated external defibrillator, and knowing what to do while waiting for help, are key elements that will enable students to be ready to save lives. From this perspective, the initiative of the ACT Foundation and its partners is remarkable,” says Danielle McCann, Minister of Health and Social Services.

Research indicates that early CPR, combined with early defibrillation, can increase the chance of survival by up to 75 per cent, according to the Heart and Stroke Foundation. As the importance of public access defibrillators grows, there is increasing focus on the need for an AED in high schools. With high schools receiving an AED, the device will be available for on-site cardiac arrest emergencies involving students and adults. It will also be available for the general public, given the role of high schools as busy community centers with many people passing through their halls each week for adult education, sports and community events.

“This is a remarkable partnership, as secondary 3 students and staff at every public high school in Quebec will be trained and better prepared to respond to emergencies. From a perspective of health and well-being of the population, it will be very useful for these thousands of students in Quebec to learn effective techniques of cardiopulmonary resuscitation early on in their lives,” mentions Isabelle Charest, Deputy Minister of Education.

“CPR training at school is a health initiative that saves lives,” added Dr. Paul Poirier, Cardiologist, IUCPQ (Institut universitaire de cardiologie et de pneumologie de Québec).

With the support of the Quebec Government, ACT’s health partners AstraZeneca Canada, Amgen Canada and Sanofi Canada, cardiologists, the Fédération des médecins spécialistes du Québec (FMSQ), the Fédération des médecins omnipraticiens du Québec (FMOQ) and community partners, the ACT Foundation has completed its fundraising campaign for AEDs for public high schools and continues program roll out.

“As a national health partner with the ACT Foundation, Amgen Canada is proud to help students learn life-saving skills for life-threatening emergencies, but more importantly, to become champions for health and science in their families and communities,” says Brian Heath, member of ACT’s Board of Directors, and Vice-President and General Manager at Amgen Canada. “We strongly believe in the power of young people to inspire wellness.”
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To date, the ACT Foundation has set up the ACT High School CPR Program in more than 1,800 high schools nation-wide, empowering more than 4.6 million youth to save lives.

“We are thrilled with the support from our partners,” said Sandra Clarke, the ACT Foundation’s Executive Director. “With it, we can enhance the CPR program in Quebec high schools with the addition of the AED training component and AED devices for schools. These are lifesaving skills that students will be able to bring to their current and future families and communities.”

The Evolution of the Program in Quebec

ACT launched Phase I in 1997 to set up the CPR training program in 400 public high schools in Quebec. Since then, more than 710,000 students have been trained and 68,000 more are trained in CPR every year. Based on this success, the Government of Quebec made CPR training mandatory in all high schools in November 2017.

During Phase 2 launched in 2011, ACT has focused on enhancing the CPR training program with AED training for students, and on providing AED devices for all public high schools. ACT expects that 68,000 secondary 3 students will be fully trained in both AED and CPR every year.

About the ACT Foundation

The ACT Foundation is the national charitable organization establishing the free CPR and AED program in Canadian high schools. The program is built on ACT’s award-winning community-based model of partnerships and support, whereby ACT finds local partners who donate the mannequins and AED training units that schools need to set up the program. High school teachers then teach CPR and how to use a defibrillator to their students as a regular part of the curriculum, reaching all youth prior to graduation. ACT’s partners, committed to bringing the program to Québec are the Government of Quebec, and our national health partners AstraZeneca Canada, Sanofi Canada, and Amgen Canada.

Website: actfoundation.ca
Twitter: @actfoundation #ACT2Save
Youtube: Youtube.com/theactfoundation
Facebook: @theactfoundation
Instagram: @actfoundation

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For media interviews and information please contact:
Maxime Debeauvais
NATIONAL Public Relations
MDebeauvais@national.ca
Tel: +1-514-843-2393

Jennifer Edwards
Director of Operations
ACT Foundation
jedwards@actfoundation.ca
Tel: +1-613-286-5260
Toll: 800-465-9111

CPR Month sees students and community members of Mississauga Credit First Nation to be empowered with lifesaving skills

Hagersville, ON – November is CPR month and the Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation and lead community and provincial partner Hydro One are launching student and community training in CPR and defibrillation in Mississauga Credit First Nation. This initiative will see Grade 7 and 8 students from Lloyd S. King Elementary School and community members empowered with essential lifesaving skills.
The ACT Foundation is the charitable organization that is establishing CPR and defibrillator training programs in high schools throughout Ontario and across Canada.

ACT is working in partnership with lead community and provincial partner Hydro One, and national health partners, AstraZeneca Canada, Sanofi Canada, and Amgen Canada, to bring this program to Mississauga Credit First Nation. This initiative will see students and community members trained in how to perform CPR and how to use an automated external defibrillator (AED).

“Whether at home, school or work, this curriculum will empower students with the skills and knowledge to save lives,” said Derek Chum, Vice President, Indigenous Relations, Hydro One. “Hydro One is proud to partner with the ACT Foundation to deliver this training that’s helping to build safer communities across the province.”

“This initiative will teach Mississauga Credit First Nation young people and community members to act in an emergency, to start CPR, and to grab the AED on the wall in public places and use that too. They will learn life skills that save lives,” says Dr. Justin Maloney, Medical Director, ACT Foundation.
With eight in 10 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occurring at home or in public places, empowering youth with CPR training as part of their high school education will help increase citizen CPR response rates over the long term.

Early CPR combined with early defibrillation can increase the chance of survival for cardiac arrest victims by up to 75% according to Heart and Stroke Foundation.

“We are thrilled with the support of Hydro One,” says Sandra Clarke, the ACT Foundation’s Executive Director. “With their support, we are able to bring this lifesaving program to Mississauga Credit First Nation, ensuring youth and community members are trained. They will bring their lifesaving skills to current and future families, building stronger a community and saving lives.”

To date, the ACT Foundation has set up the CPR Program in more than 1,800 high schools nation-wide, empowering more than 4.6 million youth to save lives. See link many rescue stories.

About the ACT Foundation

The ACT Foundation is the national charitable organization establishing free CPR and AED programs in Canadian high schools. The program is built on ACT’s award-winning community-based model of partnerships and support, whereby ACT finds local partners who donate the mannequins and AED training units that schools need to set up the program. High school teachers then teach CPR and how to use a defibrillator to their students as a regular part of the curriculum, reaching all youth prior to graduation. ACT’s
partners, committed to bringing the program to Ontario are the Government of Ontario, Hydro One and our national health partners AstraZeneca Canada, Sanofi Canada, and Amgen Canada.
www.actfoundation.ca or on Twitter @actfoundation #ACT2Save

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For further information, please contact:

Jennifer Edwards
Operations Manager
ACT Foundation
act@actfoundation.ca
Tel: 613-286-5260
Toll: 800-465-9111

www.actfoundation.ca
www.youtube.com/theactfoundation
www.facebook/theactfoundation
www.twitter.com/actfoundation