Hundreds of Montreal High School Students to be Empowered to Save Lives

Hundreds of Montreal High School Students to be Empowered to Save Lives

ACT Foundation Launches High School CPR Program in Montreal Kicks-off Fundraising Campaign for mannequins for High Schools!

MONTREAL – Wednesday, November 27, 2002, 10:00 a.m., École secondaire Sophie-Barat, 1239, boulevard Gouin est, Montréal — The ACT Foundation and community partners today launch the ACT High School CPR Program in the Commission scolaire de Montreal. This initiative will result in 1,200 students from four high schools being empowered to save lives with CPR training each year. The Foundation is providing the four schools with 100 training mannequins. The four-hour CPR course will be taught to all students in one grade level by their physical education teachers every year.

The ACT Foundation has already established the CPR program in several hundred high schools across Canada, involving over 140,000 students each year. Schools are enthusiastic. Teachers report that the program boosts self-esteem and teaches responsibility. Physical education teacher Mario Loiselle at Ecole secondaire Sophie-Barat says, “This program brings a lot to high school students. They learn to save lives and it teaches them responsibility. It has a tremendous value as a life-skill. Furthermore, this training can lead to a domino effect, as the students transmit to family members the urge to also take a CPR course.” The schools that will begin CPR training in the Commision scolaire de Montréal are: École secondaire la Dauversière, École secondaire Honoré-Mercier, École secondaire Saint-Luc, and École secondaire Sophie-Barat.

The ACT High School CPR Program teaches youth the 4 Rs of CPR: Risk, Recognize, React and Resuscitate. Students learn about: risk factors for cardiovascular disease and the importance of heart healthy living; how to recognize the early warning signs of a cardiac emergency; how to react and the importance of calling 911 early. Students also learn resuscitation or CPR, and the Heimlich Manoeuvre. They will be prepared to help a parent or grandparent should they experience a heart attack or cardiac arrest, a brother, sister or child they are babysitting should they choke, or a friend involved in a drowning emergency. All youth will be predisposed to “acting” in an emergency rather than standing by as helpless witnesses. Dr. Pierre Theroux of the Montreal Heart Institute highlights the importance of the program. “One moment in life; you do not know when, nor where, nor who…. but if you know how… one life might be saved, one life for a lifetime.”

ACT’s initiative in the four Montreal schools builds upon the ACT Foundation’s 1997 launch of a pilot in 14 high schools from the English Montreal School Board and the Lester B. Pearson School Board. ACT has more recently launched the program in Laval and Rouyn-Noranda. Now, 3.500 students from 14 high schools will be trained in CPR each year.

Today’s launch kicks off the ACT Foundation’s fundraising campaign to raise funds for CPR training mannequins to allow schools to expand the program in Montreal, and to help bring the program to other Quebec communities. The Foundation is calling upon local businesses and service clubs to assist in donating mannequins to schools. ACT is pleased to announce the support of the J. W. McConnell Family Foundation to assist ACT in finding funds for mannequins and in helping schools establish the program.

The ACT Foundation is a national, non-profit organization dedicated to establishing CPR as required learning in every Canadian high school. ACT raises funds for CPR mannequins and resources needed by schools. The Foundation works in partnership with health professionals, service clubs, and CPR agencies as teacher training partners, (e.g. Red Cross, Heart and Stroke Foundation and St. John Ambulance), government and the community to help school boards establish the program. ACT’s corporate health partners are committed to the Foundation’s national goal of empowering youth to save lives. They are companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca, Aventis, Bayer Healthcare, Pfizer Canada and Pharmacia Canada.

“As staunch supporters of the ACT Foundation for the past 12 years, we are delighted to see a growing number of Quebec high schools embracing the CPR Program and its goals,” said Michel Tremblay, Director, Public Relations at Aventis Pharma Inc. “With its dual focus on emergency preparedness and prevention of cardiovascular disease, the program stands to contribute a great deal towards building a safer and a healthier society.”

Don Sancton, Director of Corporate Affairs at Pfizer Canada, adds, “Pfizer Canada is proud to be a sponsor of the tremendous work of the ACT Foundation. As a company dedicated to finding healthcare innovations, we are pleased to support the work of the ACT Foundation in equipping our population to meet healthcare emergencies. And as a Quebec-based company, we are very pleased to see the expansion of ACT’s programs in Quebec.”

1,100 Red Deer High School Students to be Empowered to Save Lives

1,100 Red Deer High School Students to be Empowered to Save Lives

Celebrating CPR month through the launch of high school CPR program

Red Deer – Thursday, November 21th, 2002 at 9:00 a.m., Festival Hall, Memorial Centre, Lindsay Thurber Comprehensive High School, 4204-58th Street — Today, the ACT Foundation, the Kiwanis Club of Red Deer, the STARS Foundation, Red Deer District Community Foundation and community partners launch the ACT High School CPR Program in Red Deer. This initiative will result in 1,100 Grade 10 students from four high schools from the Red Deer School District and Red Deer Catholic Regional Division being empowered to save lives with CPR training. The four-hour CPR course will be taught to all Grade 10 students by their physical education teachers every year.

This event is the last in the ACT Foundation’s five-city tour of Southern Alberta, launching the program in Brooks, Medicine Hat, Lethbridge, Chinook’s Edge and Red Deer in celebration of CPR month.

In November 2000, Alberta’s Minister of Learning, Dr. Lyle Oberg, announced that CPR would become a regular part of the high school curriculum, assuring all high school students graduate with the skills and knowledge to save a life. The ACT Foundation is working in partnership with Alberta Learning to bring CPR to the province’s schools. In one year alone, the ACT Foundation has implemented the high school CPR program in almost 100 Alberta high schools, reaching 22,000 students in the 2002-2003 school year. Province-wide implementation will see over 45,000 high school students trained in CPR every year.

“I am proud to say that Alberta’s students are becoming equipped with the tools to help save a person’s life in the critical moments of an emergency situation,” says Dr. Oberg. “Grade 10 students in Alberta are learning the basic CPR skills such as artificial respiration, chest compressions, and the Heimlich Maneuver, that will empower them to ‘act’ in an emergency.”

Community partnership is key to the success of the ACT High School CPR Program. As such, ACT has brought together the Kiwanis Club of Red Deer, the STARS Foundation and the Red Deer District Community Foundation in order to equip schools with the resources and teacher training required to deliver the CPR program to students. St. John Ambulance, as the teacher training partner, trains the high school teachers as CPR instructors for the program. The Red Deer Advocate donates the printing of the student manuals.

“Over the past 50 years Kiwanis Club members of Red Deer have sponsored and supported many programs for the benefit of the people of our community. We are very pleased at this opportunity to be involved with the ACT Foundation and other partners in launching the ACT High School CPR Program,” says Keith Walker, President, of the Kiwanis Club of Red Deer. This program will provide high school students with the training required to save lives now and as they continue to serve their roles as citizens of our community.”

Through the ACT High School CPR Program, students will be prepared to help a parent or grandparent should they experience a heart attack, a brother, sister or child they are babysitting should they choke, or a friend involved in a drowning emergency. “The Chain of Survival begins at the moment a patient’s illness or injury occurs. The first link must be strong, durable and talented. The ACT High School CPR Program builds that link and we at STARS are proud to play a role,” says Dr. Greg Powell, CEO of the STARS Foundation. As founding provincial partner of the ACT High School CPR Program, the STARS Foundation has committed $159,000 to help implement the program throughout Alberta.

Red Deer Emergency Services, a valuable partner in this initiative, is providing medical direction for the program. “When there is a sudden cardiac arrest we rely on a ‘Chain of Survival’ to try to save these individuals. An integral part of this chain is ‘bystander CPR.’ This is crucial to the survival of any individual suffering an out-of hospital arrest,” says Dr. Gordon Neil, Medical Director, Red Deer Emergency Services. “Through the ACT Foundation we are forging a stronger link in this chain and it will save lives. Teaching these techniques to our grade ten students provides them with a set of life-saving skills that will be with them for the rest of their lives. It does and will make a difference.”

Schools embrace the program with enthusiasm. “When you really think about the potential impact this program could have, it is remarkable! When seconds are critical and lives are literally on the line, the knowledge students will gain through this program is invaluable. Providing our students with the opportunity to develop these skills is a tremendous contribution on the part of the ACT Foundation, the Kiwanis Club of Red Deer, our Community Foundation, St. John Ambulance, the STARS Foundation and Red Deer Emergency Services,” says Cindy Jefferies, Chairman for Red Deer Public Schools.

Don Dolan, Superintendent for Red Deer Catholic Schools adds, “The ACT High School CPR Program initiative is an excellent example of community support for learning. The community has come together to empower students with the knowledge and skills to save lives. The program not only educates students about the factors of heart disease, but also encourages them to maintain healthy lifestyles.”

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is a national, non-profit organization dedicated to establishing CPR as required learning in every Canadian high school. ACT works in partnership with health professionals, service clubs, government and the community to help school boards establish the program. ACT raises funds for CPR mannequins and resources needed by schools. The ACT High School CPR Program already exists in several hundred schools in Ontario, Quebec, British Columbia, Manitoba and Alberta. ACT’s corporate health partners are committed to ACT’s cross-Canada expansion of the program. They are companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca, Aventis Pharma, Bayer Healthcare, Pfizer Canada and Pharmacia Canada.

800 Chinook’s Edge High School Students to be Empowered to Save Lives

800 Chinook’s Edge High School Students to be Empowered to Save Lives

Celebrating CPR month through the launch of high school CPR program

Olds – Wednesday, November 20th, 2002 at 10:00 a.m., Olds Junior Senior High School, 5122-48th Street, Olds — Today, the ACT Foundation, the Kiwanis Club Olds, the STARS Foundation and community partners launch the ACT High School CPR Program in Chinook’s Edge. This initiative will result in 800 Grade 10 students from eleven high schools from the Chinook’s Edge School Division being empowered to save lives with CPR training. The four-hour CPR course will be taught to all Grade 10 students by their physical education teachers every year.

This event is the fourth in the ACT Foundation’s five-city tour of Southern Alberta, launching the program in Brooks, Medicine Hat, Lethbridge, Chinook’s Edge and Red Deer in celebration of CPR month.

In November 2000, Alberta’s Minister of Learning, Dr. Lyle Oberg, announced that CPR would become a regular part of the high school curriculum, assuring all high school students graduate with the skills and knowledge to save a life. The ACT Foundation is working in partnership with Alberta Learning to bring CPR to the province’s schools. In one year alone, the ACT Foundation has implemented the high school CPR program in almost 100 Alberta high schools, reaching 22,000 students in the 2002-2003 school year. Province-wide implementation will see over 45,000 high school students trained in CPR every year.

“I am proud to say that Alberta’s students are becoming equipped with the tools to help save a person’s life in the critical moments of an emergency situation,” says Dr. Oberg. “Grade 10 students in Alberta are learning the basic CPR skills such as artificial respiration, chest compressions, and the Heimlich Maneuver, that will empower them to ‘act’ in an emergency.”

Community partnership is key to the success of the ACT High School CPR Program. As such, ACT has brought together the Kiwanis Club of Olds and the STARS Foundation in order to equip schools with the mannequins, student manuals and teacher training required to deliver the CPR program to students. St. John Ambulance, as the teacher training partner, trains the high school teachers as CPR instructors for the program. Mountain View Emergency Services is providing medical direction for the program.

Through the ACT High School CPR Program, students will be prepared to help a parent or grandparent should they experience a heart attack, a brother, sister or child they are babysitting should they choke, or a friend involved in a drowning emergency. “The Chain of Survival begins at the moment a patient’s illness or injury occurs. The first link must be strong, durable and talented. The ACT High School CPR Program builds that link and we at STARS are proud to play a role,” says Dr. Greg Powell, CEO of the STARS Foundation. As founding provincial partner of the ACT High School CPR Program, the STARS Foundation has committed $159,000 to help implement the program throughout Alberta.

Schools embrace the program with enthusiasm. “The skills our students will learn are an excellent preparation for life,” says Jim Gibbons, Superintendent of Chinook’s Edge School Division. “The skills being taught will ensure our students face critical situations throughout their lives with knowledge and confidence.”

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is a national, non-profit organization dedicated to establishing CPR as required learning in every Canadian high school. ACT works in partnership with health professionals, service clubs, government and the community to help school boards establish the program. ACT raises funds for CPR mannequins and resources needed by schools. The ACT High School CPR Program already exists in several hundred schools in Ontario, Quebec, British Columbia, Manitoba and Alberta. ACT’s corporate health partners are committed to ACT’s cross-Canada expansion of the program. They are companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca, Aventis Pharma, Bayer Healthcare, Pfizer Canada and Pharmacia Canada.

1,000 Lethbridge High School Students to be Empowered to Save Lives

1,000 Lethbridge High School Students to be Empowered to Save Lives

Celebrating CPR month through the launch of high school CPR program

Lethbridge – Tuesday, November 19th, 2002 at 10:00 a.m., Central Catholic High School, 405-18th Street South — Today, the ACT Foundation, the Kiwanis Club of Green Acres, the STARS Foundation and community partners launch the ACT High School CPR Program in Lethbridge. This initiative will result in 1,000 Grade 10 students from five high schools from the Lethbridge School District and Holy Spirit Roman Catholic Separate School Division being empowered to save lives with CPR training. The four-hour CPR course will be taught to all Grade 10 students by their physical education teachers every year.

This event is the third in the ACT Foundation’s five-city tour of Southern Alberta, launching the program in Brooks, Medicine Hat, Lethbridge, Chinook’s Edge and Red Deer in celebration of CPR month.

In November 2000, Alberta’s Minister of Learning, Dr. Lyle Oberg, announced that CPR would become a regular part of the high school curriculum, assuring all high school students graduate with the skills and knowledge to save a life. The ACT Foundation is working in partnership with Alberta Learning to bring CPR to the province’s schools. In one year alone, the ACT Foundation has implemented the high school CPR program in almost 100 Alberta high schools, reaching 22,000 students in the 2002-2003 school year. Province-wide implementation will see over 45,000 high school students trained in CPR every year.

“I am proud to say that Alberta’s students are becoming equipped with the tools to help save a person’s life in the critical moments of an emergency situation,” says Dr. Oberg. “Grade 10 students in Alberta are learning the basic CPR skills such as artificial respiration, chest compressions, and the Heimlich Maneuver, that will empower them to ‘act’ in an emergency.”

Community partnership is key to the success of the ACT High School CPR Program. As such, ACT has brought together the Kiwanis Club of Green Acres and the STARS Foundation in order to equip schools with the resources and teacher training required to deliver the CPR program to students. St. John Ambulance, as the teacher training partner, trains the high school teachers as CPR instructors for the program. The Lethbridge Herald donates the printing of the student manuals.

“The Kiwanis Club of Green Acres, as a lead community partner, is donating the mannequins that will be used in student training. The Kiwanis Club of Green Acres has served the Lethbridge community for over 50 years by supporting programs that directly benefit our children and young people,” says Paul Larson, President of the Kiwanis Club of Green Acres. “This is just one of the important student programs supported by the club.”

Through the ACT High School CPR Program, students will be prepared to help a parent or grandparent should they experience a heart attack, a brother, sister or child they are babysitting should they choke, or a friend involved in a drowning emergency. “The Chain of Survival begins at the moment a patient’s illness or injury occurs. The first link must be strong, durable and talented. The ACT High School CPR Program builds that link and we at STARS are proud to play a role,” says Dr. Greg Powell, CEO of the STARS Foundation. As founding provincial partner of the ACT High School CPR Program, the STARS Foundation has committed $159,000 to help implement the program throughout Alberta.

The Lethbridge Fire Department is a valuable partner in this initiative, providing medical direction for the program. “Each minute that goes by in a cardiac arrest situation an individual’s chances of survivability decreases significantly. Early CPR has been shown to be of great benefit in improving the likelihood of survival,” says Dr. Peter Kwan, Medical Director of the Lethbridge Fire Department. “By empowering individuals with the simple yet valuable skill of CPR the ACT program and the school divisions in Lethbridge have ensured that these young adults will be a vital link in the Chain of Survival.”

Schools embrace the program with enthusiasm. “We are most appreciative of the opportunity that the ACT High School CPR Program has provided for our students and staff. These critical skills our students acquire truly connect their learning to real life experiences, thereby enhancing the quality of their education and their lives. If at some time in the future a life is prolonged because a citizen learned this skill, then the effort, time and money will have been well spent,” says Paul Stevenson, Deputy Superintendent, Lethbridge School District.

Frank Letain, Superintendent of Holy Spirit Catholic School Division adds, “Education continues to be a key component in the ability to save lives. As a school division encompassing both rural and urban schools, the need to be self-empowered and knowledgeable about CPR is critical when the closest hospital/EMS response team could be more than just minutes away. We are grateful for our association with the ACT High School CPR Program.”

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is a national, non-profit organization dedicated to establishing CPR as required learning in every Canadian high school. ACT works in partnership with health professionals, service clubs, government and the community to help school boards establish the program. ACT raises funds for CPR mannequins and resources needed by schools. The ACT High School CPR Program already exists in several hundred schools in Ontario, Quebec, British Columbia, Manitoba and Alberta. ACT’s corporate health partners are committed to ACT’s cross-Canada expansion of the program. They are companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca, Aventis Pharma, Bayer Healthcare, Pfizer Canada and Pharmacia Canada.

1,000 Medicine Hat High School Students to be Empowered to Save Lives

1,000 Medicine Hat High School Students to be Empowered to Save Lives

Celebrating CPR month through the launch of high school CPR program

Medicine Hat – Monday, November 18th, 2002 at 10:00 a.m., Medicine Hat High School, 200-7 Street SW — Today, the ACT Foundation, the Kiwanis Club of Medicine Hat, the Kiwanis Club of Medicine Hat Golden K, the STARS Foundation and community partners launch the ACT High School CPR Program in Medicine Hat. This initiative will result in 1,000 Grade 10 students from eight high schools from the Medicine Hat School District, Medicine Hat Catholic Board of Education and Prairie Rose Regional Division being empowered to save lives with CPR training. The four-hour CPR course will be taught to all Grade 10 students by the physical education teachers every year.

This event is the second in the ACT Foundation’s five-city tour of Southern Alberta, launching the program in Brooks, Medicine Hat, Lethbridge, Chinook’s Edge and Red Deer in celebration of CPR month.

In November 2000, Alberta’s Minister of Learning, Dr. Lyle Oberg announced that CPR would become a part of the high school curriculum assuring all high school students graduate with the skills and knowledge to save a life. The ACT Foundation has rallied the support of community partners, and in one year alone, has implemented the high school CPR program in almost 100 Alberta high schools, reaching 21,000 students in the 2002-2003 school year. Province-wide implementation will see over 45,000 high school students trained in CPR every year.

“I am proud to say that Alberta’s students are becoming equipped with the tools to help save a person’s life in the critical moments of an emergency situation,” says Dr. Oberg. “Grade 10 students in Alberta are learning the basic CPR skills such as artificial respiration, chest compressions, and the Heimlich Maneuver, that will empower them to ‘act’ in an emergency.”

Community partnership is key to the success of the ACT High School CPR Program. As such, ACT has brought together the Kiwanis Club of Medicine Hat, the Kiwanis Club of Medicine Hat Golden K and the STARS Foundation in order to equip schools with the resources and teacher training required delivering the CPR program to students. St. John Ambulance, as the teacher training partner, trains the high school teachers as CPR instructors for the program. The Medicine Hat News donates the printing of the student manuals.

“The Kiwanis Club of Medicine Hat has been involved in projects that enhance the quality of life in the community. Sponsoring the ACT High School CPR Program gives us a high level of comfort that someone’s life may be saved because of the training a student took in this program,” says Dr. Ken Sauer, President of the Kiwanis Club of Medicine Hat.

Through the ACT High School CPR Program, students will be prepared to help a parent or grandparent should they experience a heart attack, a brother, sister or child they are babysitting should they choke, or a friend involved in a drowning emergency. “The Chain of Survival begins at the moment a patient’s illness or injury occurs. The first link must be strong, durable and talented. The ACT High School CPR Program builds that link and we at STARS are proud to play a role,” says Dr. Greg Powell, CEO of the STARS Foundation. As founding provincial partner of the ACT High School CPR Program, the STARS Foundation has committed $159,000 to help implement the program throughout Alberta.

The Medicine Hat Ambulance Service is a valuable partner in this initiative, providing medical direction for the program. “As an emergency physician and Medical Director of the Medicine Hat Ambulance Service, I have too often seen the devastating effect of cardiac arrests,” says Dr. Hal Canham. “The ‘Chain of Survival’ must have four strong links to maximize survival of these patients, those being early access to Emergency Medical Services, early CPR, early defibrillation and early Advanced Life Support (ALS). The Medicine Hat Ambulance Service is able to provide two strong links with early defibrillation and early ALS. However we rely on the community to strengthen the other two links in this ‘chain.’ Early CPR is integral to survival from this devastating condition. I applaud the ACT Foundation for training our local high school students in CPR. I am convinced lives will be saved in this community by having this skill taught in our school system.”

Schools embrace the program with enthusiasm. “The ACT program brings a wonderful life skill to our students which they will take to their present and future families. We’re proud to be a part of this”, says Carol Fedrau-Ens, Assistant Superintendent, Medicine Hat School District. School boards value the community partnerships. “We are very pleased to be a part of such a successful partnership. We are very appreciative of the efforts of all the partners in ensuring that our students have the necessary background to be able to apply these life-saving skills. It would be very difficult for any one partner to be successful on their own with such a large initiative,” says Brian Andjelic, Assistant Superintendent of the Prairie Rose School Division.

Guy Tetrault, Superintendent of the Medicine Hat Catholic Board of Education adds, “This initiative is advantageous to students, teachers and our division as a whole, as it not only lends to successful curriculum outcomes, but also supports the move towards building community among organizations to work together towards a common goal.”

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is a national, non-profit organization dedicated to establishing CPR as required learning in every Canadian high school. ACT works in partnership with health professionals, service clubs, government and the community to help school boards establish the program. ACT raises funds for CPR mannequins and resources needed by schools. The ACT High School CPR Program already exists in several hundred schools in Ontario, Quebec, British Columbia, Manitoba and Alberta. ACT’s corporate health partners are committed to ACT’s cross-Canada expansion of the program. They are companies in the research-intensive pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca, Aventis Pharma, Bayer Healthcare, Pfizer Canada and Pharmacia Canada.

Brooks Launch of High School CPR Program Kicks off Five-City Celebration of CPR Month in Alberta!

Brooks Launch of High School CPR Program Kicks off Five-City Celebration of CPR Month in Alberta!

Brooks – Friday, November 15th, 2002 at 10:00 a.m., Brooks Composite High School, 650-4 Avenue East — Today, the ACT Foundation, the Kiwanis Club of Brooks & District, the STARS Foundation and community partners launch the ACT High School CPR Program in Brooks. This initiative will result in all Grade 10 students from six high schools from the Grasslands Regional Division and Christ the Redeemer Catholic Separate Regional Division being empowered to save lives with CPR training. The four-hour CPR course will be taught to Grade 10 students by their physical education teachers every year.

The ACT Foundation is working in partnership with Alberta Learning to implement CPR training in the province’s schools. Alberta’s Minister of Learning, Dr. Lyle Oberg will be on-site to assist in launching the high school CPR program in Brooks.

“I am proud to say that Alberta’s students are becoming equipped with the tools to help save a person’s life in the critical moments of an emergency situation,” says Dr. Oberg. “Grade 10 students in Alberta are learning the basic CPR skills such as artificial respiration, chest compressions, and the Heimlich Maneuver, that will empower them to ‘act’ in an emergency.”

This event kicks off the ACT Foundation’s five-city tour of Southern Alberta, launching the program in Brooks, Medicine Hat, Lethbridge, Mountain View County and Red Deer in celebration of CPR month. In November 2000, Dr. Oberg announced that CPR would become a part of the high school curriculum assuring all high school students graduate with the skills and knowledge to save a life. The ACT Foundation has rallied the support of community partners, and in one year alone, has implemented the high school CPR program in almost 100 Alberta high schools, reaching 21,000 students in the 2002-2003 school year. Province-wide implementation will see over 45,000 high school students trained in CPR every year.

Community partnership is key to the success of the ACT High School CPR Program. As such, ACT has brought together the Kiwanis Club of Brooks & District, the STARS Foundation and the Brooks & District Ambulance Association in order to equip schools with the mannequins and teacher training required enabling high school teachers to deliver the CPR program to students. The Brooks & County Chronicle donates the printing of the student manuals.

The Kiwanis Clubs of Brooks and the STARS Foundation have donated 65 mannequins to schools. “One of the primary goals of Kiwanis is to work with youth in the community,” says Lionel Jus, President of the Kiwanis Club of Brooks & District.

The Brooks & District Ambulance Association is a valuable partner in the ACT High School CPR Program, training high school teachers as CPR instructors for the program. “The additional benefits of having informed, trained first responders within the community for the variety of emergency situations covered by the CPR course, is self evident,” says Dr. Gordon Holton, Director of EMS for the Brooks EMS Department.

Through the ACT High School CPR Program, students will be prepared to help a parent or grandparent should they experience a heart attack, a brother, sister or child they are babysitting should they choke, or a friend involved in a drowning emergency. “The Chain of Survival begins at the moment a patient’s illness or injury occurs. The first link must be strong, durable and talented. The ACT High School CPR Program builds that link and we at STARS are proud to play a role,” says Dr. Greg Powell, CEO of the STARS Foundation. As founding provincial partner of the ACT High School CPR Program, the STARS Foundation has committed $159,000 to help implement the program throughout Alberta.

Schools embrace the program with enthusiasm. “Grasslands Public Schools holds as one of its founding beliefs that education is an investment in the future. We are proud to be a partner with ACT and our local stakeholders to provide this essential and vital training to Grasslands students.” says Jo-Lee Godfrey, Vice-Chair of the Grasslands Regional Division. St. Joseph’s Collegiate of Christ the Redeemer Catholic Separate Regional Division will also begin the program next semester.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is a national, non-profit organization dedicated to establishing CPR as required learning in every Canadian high school. ACT works in partnership with health professionals, service clubs, government and the community to help school boards establish the program. ACT raises funds for CPR mannequins and resources needed by schools. The ACT High School CPR Program already exists in several hundred schools in Ontario, Quebec, British Columbia, Manitoba and Alberta. ACT’s corporate health partners are committed to ACT’s cross-Canada expansion of this lifesaving program. They are companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca, Aventis Pharma, Bayer Healthcare, Pfizer Canada and Pharmacia Canada.