Ontario Premier announces $650,000 commitment to ACT High School CPR Program. Ontario students to be empowered to save lives!

Ontario Premier announces $650,000 commitment to ACT High School CPR Program. Ontario students to be empowered to save lives!

OTTAWA, December 10, 2004: — Ontario high schools will be equipped to empower students to save lives through a new partnership announced today between the Ontario Government and the Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation. The partnership will see a commitment of $650,000 in funding from the Ontario government as part of a matching funding formula for CPR training mannequins for Ontario high schools. Details are being announced by Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty at a press conference at 10:30 a.m., at Hillcrest High School, 1900 Dauphin Road in Ottawa.

The ACT Foundation launched the original high school CPR program with the support of community partners as a pilot in Ottawa in 1994. Based on the success of the Ottawa pilot, the CPR program was inserted into the curriculum within the context of secondary school reform in 1999. The ACT Foundation fundraised for mannequins bringing the program to half of Ontario high schools. Due to the tremendous demand for this program, the Ontario government has made a commitment of funds as part of a matching funding formula to help the ACT Foundation raise the remaining funds needed to expand the program to all Ontario high schools.

“After setting up the program in just over half of Ontario’s high schools, we still needed to raise $1.2 million for mannequins to bring the CPR program to those communities that don’t have the program,” says ACT Foundation Executive Director Sandra Clarke. “This $650,000 commitment from the Ontario government will act as powerful leverage in our efforts to find matching funds at the community level throughout Ontario. It is a wonderful public/private partnership model that will propel this program forward.” Once implemented in all Ontario high schools, 155,000 Grade 9 students will be trained in the lifesaving skill of CPR every year.

Research indicates that CPR response by citizens can improve the out-of-hospital survival rate for cardiac arrest almost fourfold. With 85% of cardiac arrests occurring at home, empowering youth with CPR training as part of their high school education will help increase citizen CPR response rates over the long term.

“This program will empower kids with CPR as a life skill,” says Dr. Justin Maloney, Base Hospital Program Medical Director, Ottawa Hospital. “Not only will they learn how to do CPR, they will learn how to recognize a developing cardiac emergency, the importance of calling 911 quickly and how to assist while waiting for the paramedics. This is important information they will carry with them to their present and future familes.”

About the ACT Foundation The ACT Foundation is a national, non-profit organization dedicated to establishing CPR as a mandatory program in every Canadian high school. ACT raises funds for CPR mannequins for schools and guides schools in program set-up. The foundation has already established the CPR program in over 700 high schools across Canada. By the end of the 2004-2005 school year, over 700,000 Canadian students will have been trained to date through this program.

The ACT Foundation’s corporate health partners are companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca; Aventis Pharma Inc., a member of the sanofi-aventis Group; and Pfizer Canada. They provide ACT’s sustaining funding and are committed to the foundation’s national goal of empowering youth to save lives. In Ontario, Hydro One is a provincial funding partner and the Kiwanis service clubs play a key role as program partners at the community level. For more information visit: www.actfoundation.ca.

ACT High School CPR Program: An Innovative Method to Increase Incidence of Bystander CPR

ACT High School CPR Program: An Innovative Method to Increase Incidence of Bystander CPR

OTTAWA, Ontario, September 24, 2004 — Research published in the September issue of the Canadian Journal of Cardiology highlights the need for citizen CPR training, further supporting the importance of the Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation of Canada’s effort to set up a mandatory CPR program in every Canadian high school.

Related research published last month in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) highlights citizen CPR as a “crucial intervention” which significantly impacts cardiac arrest survival rates and suggests that doubling citizen CPR rates from the current 15% to 30% would see more than a thousand lives saved across Canada each year. Both studies underscore the immediate need to increase citizen CPR training.

The ACT Foundation has raised funds to donate over 15,000 mannequins to high schools. Over 500,000 students have been trained by their teachers in over 700 schools.

Earlier this week, ACT and its corporate health partners received Imagine’s 2004 “New Spirit of Community” Partnership Award, presented by the Canadian Centre for Philanthropy for ACT’s high school CPR program.

Based on the ACT program, three provinces – Ontario, Alberta and Manitoba – have implemented CPR into their curricula. ACT is urging other provinces to follow suit and is fundraising for mannequins for high schools across Canada.

About ACT
The ACT Foundation is a national, non-profit organization dedicated to establishing CPR as a mandatory program in every Canadian high school. ACT raises funds for CPR mannequins for schools and guides schools in program setup. ACT’s corporate health partners are companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca, Aventis Pharma and Pfizer Canada. The ACT High School CPR Program already exists in 700 high schools in Ontario, Quebec, British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba and Nunavut. To date, over 500,000 students from across Canada have been trained in CPR through this program.

ACT Foundation & Pharma Partners AstraZeneca, Aventis Pharma Inc. & Pfizer Canada Honoured with Imagine’s 2004 “New Spirit of Community” Partnership Award

ACT Foundation & Pharma Partners AstraZeneca, Aventis Pharma Inc. & Pfizer Canada Honoured with Imagine’s 2004 “New Spirit of Community” Partnership Award

Toronto, Ontario, September 20, 2004 — The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation of Canada and its corporate health partners AstraZeneca, Aventis Pharma Inc. and Pfizer Canada are honoured to receive Imagine’s 2004 “New Spirit of Community” Partnership Award.

Presented by the Canadian Centre for Philanthropy in a ceremony this evening, the award celebrates the outstanding example of collaboration and action between the ACT Foundation and its pharma partners, demonstrating the power of partnership to find new ways to meet pressing needs and build healthy communities.

ACT’s core funding and resources are provided by AstraZeneca, Aventis Pharma Inc. and Pfizer Canada. This enables the ACT Foundation to bring the ACT High School CPR Program to Canadian high schools. Designed to empower all youth with the skills and knowledge to save lives, the ACT program teaches CPR and cardiovascular disease prevention to youth across Canada. By equipping schools with resources and guidance on program set up, teachers then are able to teach CPR to students as a mandatory part of the curriculum. This ensures a long term, self-sustaining program which reaches all youth, including those who do not have easy access or cannot afford to pay for a public course.

“This core funding provides ACT with the critical support it needs to tackle major challenges such as bringing the CPR program to high schools across Canada – a huge endeavour, that is so very important,” says Sandra Clarke, Executive Director of the ACT Foundation. “This unique collaborative approach has been key to our success in making a long term enhancement to the education system and is already resulting in saving lives.”

With the support of ACT’s corporate health partners and through its community-based model of local partnerships and support, ACT has raised the funds to donate over 15,000 CPR training mannequins to over 700 high schools across Canada. More than 500,000 students have been trained in the lifesaving skill of CPR.

“Saving lives is so important,” said Aventis’ Jean-Francois Leprince, speaking as Chair of the ACT Foundation Board of Directors. “We need as many people as possible to help in the fight against cardiovascular disease. Any initiative aimed at motivating our youth to take an interest in health matters is worthy of our industry’s efforts and commitment.”

About ACT
The ACT Foundation is a national, non-profit organization dedicated to establishing CPR as a mandatory program in every Canadian high school. ACT raises funds from community partners for CPR mannequins for schools and guides schools in program setup. ACT’s receives its core funding from companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca, Aventis Pharma Inc. and Pfizer Canada. These companies are committed to ACT’s goal to empower Canadian youth to save lives.

Landmark Study Calls on Critical Need to Increase CPR Training to Save Lives

Landmark Study Calls on Critical Need to Increase CPR Training to Save Lives

Canadian Foundation on Cross-Canada Campaign to Inject CPR Into the Heart of High School Curriculum

OTTAWA, Ontario, August 12, 2004 — The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation of Canada lauds a landmark Canadian study published today in the New England Journal of Medicine, highlighting the importance of citizen CPR as a “crucial intervention” which significantly impacts cardiac arrest survival rates. The largest multi-centre controlled trial ever conducted in a prehospital setting suggests that doubling citizen CPR rates in Canada from the current 15% to 30% would see more than a thousand lives saved across Canada each year. The study’s author calls on the importance of immediate attention given to increasing citizen CPR training across Canada in order to save lives.

The ACT Foundation, in fact, is working on a national campaign to make CPR a mandatory part of the high school curriculum across Canada. Through its community-based model of partnerships and support, the ACT Foundation has raised funds to donate over 15,000 mannequins to high schools across Canada and has trained well over 1,000 physical education teachers from more than 700 schools in British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba, Nunavut, Ontario and Quebec to teach CPR to students. To date, over 500,000 students have been trained and lives are being saved. Youth embrace the program with confidence and are responding to a wide range of emergencies involving family and friends.

Based on ACT’s successful high school program, three Canadian provinces – Ontario, Alberta and Manitoba – have implemented CPR into their physical education curricula. The ACT Foundation is now urging other provinces to follow suit and is fundraising for mannequin resources to bring the program to all schools across Canada so that every Canadian youth will be empowered with the simple yet crucial skill of CPR.

“This study proves the critical importance of CPR,” said Sandra Clarke, Executive Director of the ACT Foundation. “While we have made much progress, we still have a long way to go to reach our goal of empowering all schools across Canada to teach CPR to students. The biggest stumbling block is raising the money for mannequins and start-up resources for teachers to train their students. I urge corporations and service clubs everywhere to support this initiative to bring CPR to schools in their community.”

About ACT
The ACT Foundation is a national, non-profit organization dedicated to establishing CPR as a mandatory program in every Canadian high school. ACT raises funds for CPR mannequins for schools and guides schools in program setup. ACT’s corporate health partners are companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca, Aventis Pharma and Pfizer Canada.

Centre Hastings Students to be Empowered to Save Lives

Centre Hastings Students to be Empowered to Save Lives

MADOC, Ontario, April 27, 2004 – The ACT Foundation and community partners launch the ACT High School CPR Program today, at 11:00 a.m. at Centre Hastings Secondary School. The event will be marked by the donation of a set of CPR mannequins to the school on behalf of the Kiwanis Clubs of Madoc and Tweed.

Through the ACT High School CPR Program, all Grade 9 students will be trained in the lifesaving skills of CPR. The four-hour CPR course will be taught to all Grade 9 students by their physical education teachers each year as a mandatory part of the curriculum.

The ACT High School CPR Program is based upon community partnerships and support. As such, ACT had brought together local partners to bring the program to Centre Hastings Secondary School. The Kiwanis Clubs of Madoc and Tweed have joined forces to donate the mannequins needed to conduct the CPR training.

“Kiwanis recognizes worthwhile projects for youth. Through this program I can envision so many lives being saved,” said Karen Jones, Director for the Kiwanis Club of Madoc. “I am most happy that Madoc and Tweed Kiwanis Clubs could work together on this very worthwhile project for our local high school.”

The Belleville Intelligencer has committed to donating the printing of the student and teacher manuals for the program for Centre Hastings Secondary School, as well as all high schools within the Hastings & Prince Edward District School Board. The Regional Base Hospital of Southeastern Ontario, as the teacher training partner, trains the high school teachers as CPR instructors for the program and provides valuable medical direction.

“Ambulance response times are longer in the country. It’s all the more important for folks to be able to look after each other,” said Dr. Justin Maloney, Medical Director of the Base Hospital Program for Ottawa-Carleton.

Through the ACT High School CPR Program, students will be prepared to help a parent or grandparent should they experience a heart attack; a brother, sister or child they are babysitting should they choke; or a friend involved in a drowning emergency.

“This program will train and empower students at Centre Hastings Secondary School to help save lives in their local community and abroad. As a school board, we are very appreciative of the Tweed and Madoc Kiwanis Clubs for their significant contributions to this project. Providing our students with CPR Training builds responsibility, independence and provides them with a life-long skill,” stated Judy Edgar, Chair of the Hastings & Prince Edward District School Board.

Grant Montgomery, School Principal at Centre Hastings High School, is pleased to have the ACT High School CPR Program added to the curriculum and brought to his school by the local community.

“Community is a real focus at the school here, and it’s special programs like these that enrich our curriculum. Without the community support, we wouldn’t be able to offer this lifesaving training to our students.”

About ACT
The ACT Foundation is a national, non-profit organization dedicated to establishing CPR as a mandatory program in every Canadian high school. ACT raises funds for CPR mannequins for schools and guides schools in program setup. ACT’s corporate health partners are companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca, Aventis Pharma and Pfizer Canada. The ACT High School CPR Program already exists in 700 high schools in Ontario, Quebec, British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba and Nunavut. To date, over 500,000 students from across Canada have been trained in CPR through this program.

1,600 Belleville Area Students to be Empowered to Save Lives Every Year

1,600 Belleville Area Students to be Empowered to Save Lives Every Year

BELLEVILLE, Ontario, April 27, 2004 — The ACT Foundation and community partners launch the ACT High School CPR Program in the Belleville area today. This initiative will result in 1,600 Grade 9 students from all 8 high schools in the Hastings & Prince Edward District School Board being empowered to save lives with CPR training every year.

Through the ACT High School CPR Program, all Grade 9 students will be trained in the lifesaving skills of CPR. The four-hour CPR course will be taught to all Grade 9 students by their physical education teachers each year as a mandatory part of the curriculum.

The ACT High School CPR Program is based upon community partnerships and support. As such, ACT has brought together the Kiwanis clubs of Belleville, Madoc and Tweed; the Belleville Intelligencer; and the Regional Base Hospital of Southeastern Ontario as program partners to bring the program to the Belleville area. The Kiwanis Club of Belleville donated a class set of CPR training mannequins to be shared among schools in the Belleville and surrounding area, and the Kiwanis clubs of Madoc and Tweed together donated a set of mannequins to Centre Hastings High School in Madoc.

“Kiwanis recognizes worthwhile projects for youth. Through this program I can envision so many lives being saved,” said Karen Jones, Director for the Kiwanis Club of Madoc. “This program will see that in the future everyone in this area will know CPR.”

The Belleville Intelligencer has committed to donating the printing of the student and teacher manuals for all high schools in the Hastings & Prince Edward District School Board. The Regional Base Hospital of Southeastern Ontario, as the teacher training partner, trains the high school teachers as CPR instructors for the program and provides valuable medical direction.

Through the ACT High School CPR Program, students will be prepared to help a parent or grandparent should they experience a heart attack; a brother, sister or child they are babysitting should they choke; or a friend involved in a drowning emergency.

Today’s events mark the launch of the ACT High School CPR Program in the communities of Belleville, Trenton, Madoc, Bancroft and Picton. The schools are receiving their training and classroom resources and are excited to begin delivering the program to their students. Teachers, students, parents, and school board officials embrace the program with enthusiasm.

“This program will train and empower students at Centre Hastings Secondary School to help save lives in their local community and abroad. As a school board, we are very appreciative of the Tweed and Madoc Kiwanis Clubs for their significant contributions to this project. Providing our students with CPR Training builds responsibility, independence and provides them with a life-long skill,” stated Judy Edgar, Chair of the Hastings & Prince Edward District School Board.

ACT is continuing its fundraising efforts in the Belleville area in order to outfit all schools with their own set of mannequins, to ensure that all students graduate with the skills and knowledge to save a life.

“ACT’s aim is to raise funds to outfit all high schools in the board with mannequins, to ensure that every school can run the program.” states Sandra Clarke, Executive Director of the ACT Foundation. “We still need companies or organizations to come on board to donate mannequins to the remaining 6 schools.”
About ACT
The ACT Foundation is a national, non-profit organization dedicated to establishing CPR as a mandatory program in every Canadian high school. ACT raises funds for CPR mannequins for schools and guides schools in program setup. ACT’s corporate health partners are companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca, Aventis Pharma and Pfizer Canada. The ACT High School CPR Program already exists in 700 high schools in Ontario, Quebec, British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba and Nunavut. To date, over 500,000 students from across Canada have been trained in CPR through this program.

2,500 Lanark-Carleton High School Students to be Empowered to Save Lives

2,500 Lanark-Carleton High School Students to be Empowered to Save Lives

Carleton Place, Ontario – Monday March 1, 2004 — The ACT Foundation and community partners launch the ACT High School CPR Program in Lanark-Carleton today. This initiative will result in 2,500 Grade 9 students from 12 area high schools from four different school boards being empowered to save lives with CPR training, this year alone. The four-hour CPR course will be taught to all Grade 9 students by their physical education teachers each year as a core unit in the curriculum.

Community partnership is key to the success of the ACT High School CPR Program. As such, Lanark-Carleton Member of Parliament, Scott Reid, is donating his annual salary increase to equip schools with the resources and teacher training required to deliver the CPR program to the schools in his constituency.

“It’s wonderful to be a part of this program,” says Reid. “CPR training will do more to save lives in our community than anything else I can think of.”

Through the ACT High School CPR Program, students will be prepared to help a parent or grandparent should they experience a heart attack; a brother, sister or child they are babysitting should they choke; or a friend involved in a drowning emergency.

The Regional Base Hospital of Southeastern Ontario, as the teacher training partner, trains the high school teachers as CPR instructors for the program and provides valuable medical direction.

“Ambulance response times are longer in the country. It’s all the more important for folks to be able to look after each other” says Dr. Justin Maloney, Medical Director of the Base Hospital Program for Ottawa-Carleton. “Kids learning CPR is critical. It’s the heart of any first aid program.”

Today’s events mark the first-time implementation launch of the ACT High School CPR Program in the communities of Almonte, Carleton Place, Smith Falls, West Carleton, and Dunrobin; it also marks a topping-off of much needed resources for high schools in the communities of Perth and Kanata. Schools receiving the program represent the Upper Canada District School Board, the Catholic District School Board of Eastern Ontario, the Ottawa-Carleton District School Board and the Ottawa-Carleton Catholic District School Board. The schools are receiving their training and classroom resources and are excited to begin delivering the program to their students. Teachers, students, parents, and school board officials embrace the program with enthusiasm.

The Kiwanis Club of Ottawa and the Ottawa Citizen helped launch the original ACT High School CPR Program pilot in 1994 within Ottawa-Carleton, by donating the mannequins, teacher training, and printing of the classroom resources. The Kiwanis Club of Perth subsequently donated the necessary resources to its two local schools in 2002.

About ACT
The ACT Foundation is a national, non-profit organization dedicated to establishing CPR as a mandatory program in every Canadian high school. ACT raises funds for CPR mannequins for schools and guides schools in program setup. ACT’s corporate health partners are companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca, Aventis Pharma and Pfizer Canada. The ACT High School CPR Program already exists in 600 high schools in Ontario, Quebec, British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba and Nunavut. To date, over 500,000 students from across Canada have been trained in CPR through this program.

Kiwanis Club of Ottawa Jumpstarts ACT Foundation’s High School CPR “Dollars for Mannequins” Campaign with $12,000 donation and Celebration of Ottawa Rescue

Kiwanis Club of Ottawa Jumpstarts ACT Foundation’s High School CPR “Dollars for Mannequins” Campaign with $12,000 donation and Celebration of Ottawa Rescue

OTTAWA – February 27, 2004, Chateau Laurier Hotel, 1:00 p.m. — The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation unveils its “Dollars for Mannequins” campaign with a $12,000 donation from the Kiwanis Club of Ottawa Medical Foundation. This event will be marked with the celebration of Woodroffe High School student Rob Simpson’s 21st birthday. Rob’s life was saved with CPR when he suffered a cardiac arrest on January 16th of this year. Rob’s two vice principals, both trained in the ACT program, came to Rob’s aid with lifesaving CPR. The goal of ACT’s fundraising campaign is to raise $48,000 to purchase 480 CPR training mannequins for Ottawa high schools.

“The Kiwanis Club of Ottawa is delighted to continue its support of the ACT Foundation’s High School CPR Program,” says club president, David Daubney. “We’ve been on board since the beginning in 1994, and want to ensure all Ottawa high schools have the CPR mannequins they need so all youth will be trained in CPR.”

The ACT Foundation, with the support of local partners, launched the high school CPR program as a pilot in some of Ottawa’s schools in 1994. At that time, the Kiwanis Club of Ottawa and its Medical Foundation donated $62,500 for 800 mannequins for schools. High school teachers were trained by St. John Ambulance as CPR instructors to teach their students. The Ottawa Citizen, donates the printing of student manuals to schools every year and medical direction comes from the Ottawa Base Hospital Program through Dr. Justin Maloney. Now, almost ten years later, 50,000 Ottawa students have been trained in CPR. The program’s success has seen it spread to more than 600 high schools across Canada and over 500,000 youth have been trained to date.

“We are now turning our attention back to Ottawa, with the goal of ensuring that all of our schools have the lifesaving CPR program”, says ACT Foundation Executive Director, Sandra Clarke. “We urge Ottawa businesses to follow the Kiwanis Club of Ottawa Medical Foundation’s lead and sponsor mannequins for their local schools”. The mannequins can be sponsored for $100 each. Three hundred and sixty (360) mannequins still need to be sponsored.

About the ACT Foundation
The ACT Foundation is a national, non-profit organization dedicated to establishing CPR as a mandatory program in every Canadian high school. ACT raises funds for CPR mannequins for schools and guides schools in program setup. ACT’s corporate health partners are committed to ACT’s cross-Canada expansion of the program. They are companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca, Aventis Pharma and Pfizer Canada.