Canadian youth learning CPR in high school

Canadian youth learning CPR in high school

OTTAWA, November 29, 2005 — If Detroit Red Wings defenseman Jiri Fischer had suffered his cardiac arrest in a Canadian hockey arena he might have been saved by a high school student, thanks to the tens of thousands of teens trained in CPR each year through the ACT High School CPR Program.

Picture this: A man collapses at a hockey game or other public area. A teenage girl slips through the crowd of helpless adults gathered around the man, calmly saying, “I know CPR.” She orders someone to call 911 and performs CPR the way she learned in high school. Moments later someone brings a defibrillator. A life is saved.

Research shows that citizen-CPR can increase survival for victims of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest by almost fourfold. The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is empowering youth to do just that. The Foundation is helping high schools across Canada insert CPR in the curriculum thus equipping youth with the knowledge and skills to apply CPR to victims in hockey arenas, shopping malls…even their own homes.

About the ACT Foundation
The ACT Foundation is a national, non-profit organization dedicated to establishing CPR as a mandatory program in every Canadian high school. ACT spearheads community support to donate mannequins and materials to schools. Teachers then teach the program to their students. The Foundation has implemented the ACT High School CPR program in over 700 high schools across Canada and over 700,000 students have already been trained through this award-winning initiative. ACT’s corporate health partners are: AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb Canada, Pfizer Canada and sanofi-aventis. For more information visit: www.actfoundation.ca

London students empowered to save lives

London students empowered to save lives

London, ON, November 28, 2005 — Today, the Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation, with support from the Government of Ontario and local community partners, launches the ACT High School CPR Program in London at St. Thomas Aquinas Catholic Secondary School, 1360 Oxford Street West. This initiative will result in 8,600 Grade 9 students from 37 high schools from the Thames Valley District School Board and the London District Catholic School Board being empowered to save lives every year. Communities covered by the program include London, St. Thomas, Dorchester, Woodstock, Tillsonburg, Ingersoll, Aylmer, Strathroy, Glencoe, Norwich, Parkhill, West Lorne, and Arva. The four- hour CPR course will be taught to all Grade 9 students by their physical education teachers as a regular part of the curriculum.

“This is a fantastic program that will help strengthen the first link in the ‘Chain of Survival’ and help increase the chances of surviving an out-of- hospital cardiac arrest,” says Dr. Jon Dreyer, Medical Director for the London Health Sciences Centre Base Hospital Program, as well as Medical Director for the ACT Program in London. “Teaching high school students to recognize the signs and symptoms of a heart attack, as well as how to perform CPR, is the key to reducing mortality from this problem. I am very pleased to be associated with this program.”

Research indicates that citizen CPR response can improve survival rate for victims of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest by almost fourfold. With eight in 10 cardiac arrests occurring at home, empowering youth with CPR training as part of their high school education will help increase citizen CPR response rates over the long term. And the program has other benefits.

“In addition to empowering youth to save lives, the CPR program has a strong health promotion message,” says ACT Executive Director Sandra Clarke. “Students learn about risk factors for heart disease and the importance of adopting heart healthy lifestyle behaviors at a young age.” The ACT program prepares youth to help a parent or grandparent should they experience a heart attack or stroke; a brother, sister or child they are babysitting should they choke; or a friend involved in a drowning emergency. “They will bring their health promotion message and lifesaving skills to their present and future families,” says Clarke.

The ACT High School CPR Program is built on ACT’s award-winning community- based model of partnerships and support, through which the Foundation rallies the support of community partners to donate funding for start-up materials (mannequins, materials and teacher training) for schools.

Through the Foundation’s public/private funding partnership model 1,140 CPR training mannequins have been donated to the 37 London-area high schools and 200 physical education teachers are being trained as CPR Instructors. In London, this partnership model involves a commitment of $60,000 from the Ontario government, which is being matched by local community partners for a combined commitment of $120,000. Lead community partners in London are GoodLife Fitness Clubs, Sterling Trucks Corporation and CAW Local 1001. Other community partners include the Charles H. Ivey Foundation, London Community Foundation, and Shoppers Drug Mart. In addition to funds from the Ontario government, the ACT Foundation has received provincial-level funding to assist with community coordination of the program from Hydro One and the Ontario Trillium Foundation.

The ACT Foundation’s goal in Ontario is to expand the CPR program to the remaining half of high schools in the province that do not yet have the program. To aid implementation, ACT has secured a commitment of $650,000 from the Ontario government through its public/private funding partnership model for mannequins and program start-up costs for schools.

“Training young people to save lives is an important investment into the health of our community,” says Deb Matthews, MPP, London North Centre. “The ACT program provides a wonderful opportunity for London students to learn a valuable skill; a skill that could one day save your life or mine.” ACT is now searching for matching community funding according to local needs as it brings the program to communities throughout the province. Once set up in all Ontario high schools, 150,000 youth will be trained in CPR every year.

About the ACT Foundation
The ACT Foundation is a national, non-profit organization dedicated to promoting health and empowering Canadians to save lives. ACT is driving a national campaign to establish CPR as a mandatory program in every Canadian high school. ACT raises funds for CPR mannequins for schools and guides schools in program set up. The Foundation has already established the CPR program in over 700 high schools across Canada and over 700,000 youth have been trained to date. The Foundation and its core partners are winners of Imagine’s “New Spirit of Community Partnership” Award. Core partners are companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca, Bristol- Myers Squibb Canada, Pfizer Canada and sanofi-aventis. They provide ACT’s sustaining funding and are committed to the Foundation’s national goal of promoting health and empowering youth to save lives. For more information visit: www.actfoundation.ca.

Over 700,000 students empowered with CPR to save lives

Over 700,000 students empowered with CPR to save lives

OTTAWA, ONTARIO, 28/11/05

With the release today of new CPR standards aimed at improving odds of survival, the Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation of Canada is stepping up its national campaign to establish CPR as a mandatory course in every high school. ACT spearheads community support to donate mannequins to schools and guides schools in setting up a long- term, self-sustaining program. Physical education teachers teach CPR to students as a regular part of the curriculum.

ACT has already brought the lifesaving CPR program to over 700 high schools across Canada. Over 700,000 students have been trained. Through the Foundation’s award winning community based model of partnerships and support, ACT has donated over 15,000 mannequins to schools. Three provincial governments have included CPR in the provincial curricula (Ontario, Alberta and Manitoba). Research indicates that citizen CPR response can improve survival rates for victims of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest by almost fourfold. With eight in 10 cardiac arrests occurring at home, empowering youth with CPR training in high school will increase CPR response rates at home, in hockey arenas, shopping malls, and throughout the community.
About the ACT Foundation
The ACT Foundation is a national, non-profit organization dedicated to establishing CPR as a mandatory program in every Canadian high school. ACT spearheads community support to donate mannequins and materials to schools. Teachers then teach the program to their students. The Foundation has implemented the ACT High School CPR program in over 700 high schools across Canada and over 700,000 students have already been trained through this award-winning initiative. ACT’s corporate health partners are: AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb Canada, Pfizer Canada and sanofi-aventis. For more information visit: www.actfoundation.ca.

Quebec students to be empowered to save lives!

Quebec students to be empowered to save lives!

MONTREAL, October 24, 2005 — Many Quebec high schools will be equipped to empower students to save lives through a commitment announced today by Minister of Health and Social Services Philippe Couillard to the ACT High School CPR program. Details were announced by Minister Couillard during a press conference at École secondaire Honoré Mercier, in Montreal this morning.

“The commitment announced today by Health Minister Couillard on behalf of the Quebec Government will result in thousands of youth being empowered to save lives,” says ACT Foundation Executive Director Sandra Clarke. “It will also provide tremendous momentum to our “Dollars for Mannequins” fundraising campaign, aimed at bringing the CPR program to all Quebec high schools.” Based on the ACT Foundation’s award-winning community based model, the Foundation fundraises for resources that schools need to set up the CPR program (e.g. mannequins, teacher training and materials) and guides schools in setting up a long-term and self-sustaining program. High school teachers then teach students the CPR program as a regular part of the curriculum, reaching all students prior to graduation.

Since starting a pilot in several Montreal area schools in 1997, the ACT Foundation has brought the lifesaving CPR program to 50 Quebec high schools. Over 7,000 youth will be trained this year. Momentum is high with 80 more schools seeking the program. ACT’s “Dollars for Mannequins” campaign involves a public-private funding partnership model with a goal of raising $1.2 million. The ACT Foundation has raised $500,000 from the private sector and the community. This includes a $200,000 commitment from Sun Life Financial. Other program partners include Bell Canada, Hydro Quebec, Jean Coutu Group, McKesson Canada, RBC Royal Bank and Scotiabank. A number of Kiwanis service clubs and other community partners are also involved. The Montreal-based J.W. McConnell Family Foundation has also made a $315,000 donation to the ACT Foundation to support ACT’s community coordination role in helping schools throughout the province set up the CPR program.

The ACT Foundation still needs to raise $400,000 for mannequins to reach its $1.2 million fundraising goal to bring the CPR program to all high schools. Once implemented in all Quebec high schools, 75,000 students will be trained in the lifesaving skill of CPR every year by their high school teachers as a life skill. Research indicates that CPR response by citizens can improve the out-of-hospital survival rate for cardiac arrest almost fourfold. With 85% of out of hospital cardiac arrests occurring at home, empowering youth with CPR training as part of their high school education will increase citizen CPR response rates over the long term.

About the ACT Foundation
The ACT Foundation is a national, non-profit organization dedicated to bringing the CPR program to every Canadian high school. ACT raises funds for CPR mannequins for schools and guides schools in program set-up. The Foundation has established the CPR program in over 700 high schools across Canada. Over 700,000 Canadian students have been trained to date. The ACT Foundation’s corporate health partners are companies in the research-intensive pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca; Bristol-Myers Squibb Canada, Pfizer Canada, and sanofi-aventis. They provide ACT’s sustaining funding and are committed to the Foundation’s goal of promoting health and empowering youth to save lives. For more information visit:www.actfoundation.ca.

Algoma District School Board students to be empowered to save lives

Algoma District School Board students to be empowered to save lives

SAULT STE. MARIE, Ontario, June 8, 2005 — High school students in the Algoma District School Board will be empowered to save lives through a new program launched by the Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation of Canada with support from the Ontario government and local community partners. Launched today at 10:30 a.m. at White Pines Collegiate and Vocational School, the program will see approximately 1,500 local Grade 9 students from all 11 Algoma high schools trained in the lifesaving skill of CPR every year.

To date, the ACT Foundation has fundraised for mannequins to bring the program to half of Ontario high schools. Due to the tremendous demand for this program, the Ontario government has committed half the remaining funds needed to expand the ACT High School CPR Program to all Ontario high schools through a public-private matching funds model. Once implemented in all Ontario high schools, 155,000 Grade 9 students will be trained in the lifesaving skill of CPR every year.

The Kiwanis Club of Lakeshore and the Kiwanis Club of Sault Ste. Marie have worked with the ACT Foundation to bring together partners to donate the resources required for teachers to deliver the program. The clubs have spearheaded a campaign to raise the matching half of Ontario government funding to bring the program to their community, rallying the support of Algoma Steel Inc., G-P Flakeboard Company, Keith Spencer Trucking Ltd., McDougall Fuels, PUC Services Inc., and Viau Financial Group to outfit all 11 Algoma District School Board high schools with the necessary resources to deliver the high school CPR program, donating 300 mannequins.

Research indicates that CPR response by citizens can improve the out-of-hospital survival rate for cardiac arrest almost fourfold. With 85 per cent of cardiac arrests occurring at home, empowering youth with CPR training as part of their high school education will help increase citizen CPR response rates over the long term.

Dr. Paul Hoogeveen has volunteered to be the Medical Director for the program and St. John Ambulance in Sault Ste. Marie has come aboard as the teacher-training partner in the program, ensuring all Grade 9 physical education teachers are trained to deliver the CPR course to their students.

“Currently in Algoma we have a bystander CPR rate that is slightly over 20%. This is good compared to an average bystander CPR rate of 15% in the rest of Ontario,” says Dr. Paul Hoogeveen, Medical Director for ambulance services in Algoma. “Other areas such a Seattle, Washington have bystander CPR rates as high as 60%. This translates to and out-of-hospital survival rate for cardiac arrest that is at least 3 to 4 times better than Ontario or Algoma. Twenty percent is too low when this easy to learn procedure can save lives. I believe the ACT program along with other community initiatives will improve our rates of bystander CPR and survival from cardiac arrest in the future.”

Through the ACT High School CPR Program, every Grade 9 student in the Sault Ste. Marie and surrounding region will will be prepared to help a parent or grandparent should they experience a heart attack; a brother, sister or child they are babysitting should they choke; or a friend involved in a drowning emergency. Schools participating in this launch encompass the communities of Sault Ste. Marie, Desbarats, Chapleau, Elliot Lake, Hornepayne, Wawa, and Blind River.

In addition to the Ontario government, the Kiwanis Clubs of Lakeshore and Sault Ste. Marie, and St. John Ambulance, Shoppers Drug Mart, Hydro One, and the Ontario Trillium Foundation have helped bring the program to Sault Ste. Marie through a provincial partnership to help bring the ACT High School CPR Program to communities across the province.

“This community support is a tremendous boost to ACT’s efforts in Ontario, as we endeavor to bring our CPR program to all Ontario high schools.” said ACT Foundation Executive Director Sandra Clarke. “This lifesaving program is simply not possible without this kind of funding support for training mannequins needed by schools.”
About the ACT Foundation
The ACT Foundation is a national, non-profit organization dedicated to establishing CPR as a mandatory program in every Canadian high school. ACT raises funds for CPR mannequins for schools and guides schools in program set-up. The foundation has already established the CPR program in over 700 high schools across Canada. By the end of the 2004-2005 school year, over 700,000 Canadian students will have been trained to date through this program.

The ACT Foundation’s corporate health partners are companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca, Pfizer Canada and sanofi-aventis. They provide ACT’s sustaining funding and are committed to the foundation’s national goal of empowering youth to save lives. For more information visit: www.actfoundation.ca.

Timmins students to be empowered to save lives

Timmins students to be empowered to save lives

TIMMINS, Ontario, June 6, 2005 — All five high schools in Timmins and South Porcupine will be equipped to empower students to save lives through a new program launched by the Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation of Canada with support from the Ontario government and the Timmins Kinettes. Launched today at Timmins High and Vocational School, the program will see approximately 700 local Grade 9 students from all five Timmins high schools trained in the lifesaving skill of CPR every year.

To date, the ACT Foundation has fundraised for mannequins to bring the program to half of Ontario high schools. Due to the tremendous demand for this program, the Ontario government has committed half the remaining funds needed to expand the ACT High School CPR Program to all Ontario high schools through a public-private matching funds model. Once implemented in all Ontario high schools, 155,000 Grade 9 students will be trained in the lifesaving skill of CPR every year.

The ACT Foundation has brought together partners to donate the resources required for teachers to deliver the program. The Timmins Kinettes have matched the Ontario government funding to bring the program to their community. Together with the Ontario government, the Timmins Kinettes have donated 120 CPR mannequins to Timmins high schools. Shoppers Drug Mart has sponsored the printing of the classroom materials (student and teacher manuals) for the program.

“The Kinette Club of Timmins follows our national motto of serving our community’s greatest needs. When we were first approached about this project we knew instantly that this was a program we wanted to support. Helping students to save lives can only benefit everyone. We’re very proud to be associated with this project,” says Darlene Bate, President of the Kinette Club of Timmins.

Research indicates that CPR response by citizens can improve the out-of-hospital survival rate for cardiac arrest almost fourfold. With 85 per cent of cardiac arrests occurring at home, empowering youth with CPR training as part of their high school education will help increase citizen CPR response rates over the long term.

“This is an exciting time. We know CPR, when performed properly and in a timely fashion, saves lives. Yet, public knowledge of CPR is poor,” says Dr. Chris Loreto, Medical Director, Timmins & District Hospital. “We now have a venue in which this potential life saving intervention will be taught to a new generation. This will only improve the heart health of our community.”

Dr. Loreto and the Timmins & District Hospital have assured that physical education teachers are trained to deliver the CPR course to their students, at no cost to the schools or teachers.

Through the ACT High School CPR Program, every Grade 9 student in Timmins and South Porcupine will be prepared to help a parent or grandparent should they experience a heart attack; a brother, sister or child they are babysitting should they choke; or a friend involved in a drowning emergency. The participating five schools represent the District School Board of Ontario Northeast, the Conseil scolaire de district du Nord-Est de l’Ontario, the Conseil scolaire de district catholique des Grandes Rivières, and the Northeastern Catholic District School Board.

In addition to the Ontario government, the Timmins Kinettes, Timmins and District Hospital, and Shoppers Drug Mart, Hydro One, and the Ontario Trillium Foundation have also helped bring the program to Timmins through a provincial partnership to help bring the ACT High School CPR Program to communities across the province.

“This community support is a tremendous boost to ACT’s efforts in Ontario, as we endeavor to bring our CPR program to all Ontario high schools.” said ACT Foundation Executive Director Sandra Clarke. “This lifesaving program is simply not possible without this kind of funding support for training mannequins needed by schools.”
About the ACT Foundation
The ACT Foundation is a national, non-profit organization dedicated to establishing CPR as a mandatory program in every Canadian high school. ACT raises funds for CPR mannequins for schools and guides schools in program set-up. The foundation has already established the CPR program in over 700 high schools across Canada. By the end of the 2004-2005 school year, over 700,000 Canadian students will have been trained to date through this program.

The ACT Foundation’s corporate health partners are companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca, Pfizer Canada and sanofi-aventis. They provide ACT’s sustaining funding and are committed to the foundation’s national goal of empowering youth to save lives. For more information visit: www.actfoundation.ca.

Members of National Assembly to receive introduction to lifesaving CPR program

Members of National Assembly to receive introduction to lifesaving CPR program

QUEBEC CITY, Quebec, June 2, 2005 — Quebec MNAs will learn the importance of citizen CPR training and discover how easy it is to learn the lifesaving skill through an introduction to CPR provided by the Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation of Canada today at the National Assembly. The event, held in the Papineau Room of the Hôtel du Parlement at 1:30 p.m., will also introduce MNAs to the lifesaving ACT High School CPR Program, which the ACT Foundation aims to bring to all Quebec high schools.

The ACT High School CPR Program has already received the support of key government officials, including Minister of Health Philippe Couillard. Minister Couillard has provided funding from his discretionary budget to allow ACT to implement the program in several Quebec high schools. He also joins the ACT Foundation in hosting today’s CPR awareness event for MNAs.

Research indicates that CPR response by citizens can improve the out-of-hospital survival rate for cardiac arrest almost fourfold. With 85% of cardiac arrests occurring at home, empowering youth with CPR training as part of their high school education will help increase citizen CPR response rates over the long term.

Interest in the ACT High School CPR Program in Quebec continues to increase.

“In fact,” says ACT’s Executive Director Sandra Clarke, “momentum has built so incredibly over the past year that we’ve more than doubled the number of schools in which we’ve set up the program from 20 to 50. This past school year, 7,500 Quebec youth were trained in CPR. Upon full Quebec-wide implementation, the program will reach 375 schools and 75,000 students every year.”

The ACT High School CPR Program teaches youth the 4 Rs of CPR: Risk, Recognize, React and Resuscitate. Students learn about: risk factors for cardiovascular disease and the importance of heart healthy living; how to recognize the early warning signs of a cardiac emergency; how to react and the importance of calling 911 early. Students also learn resuscitation or CPR and the Heimlich Manoeuvre. They will be prepared to help a parent or grandparent should they experience a heart attack or cardiac arrest, a brother, sister or child they are babysitting should they choke, or a friend involved in a drowning emergency. All youth will be predisposed to “acting” in an emergency rather than standing by as helpless witnesses.
About ACT
The ACT Foundation is a national, non-profit organization dedicated to establishing CPR as a mandatory program in every Canadian high school. ACT raises funds for CPR mannequins for schools and guides schools in program set-up. The foundation has already established the CPR program in over 700 high schools across Canada. By the end of the 2004-2005 school year, over 700,000 Canadian students will have been trained to date through this program.

The ACT Foundation’s corporate health partners are companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca, Pfizer Canada and sanofi-aventis. They provide ACT’s sustaining funding and are committed to the foundation’s national goal of empowering youth to save lives. ACT’s provincial partners in Quebec are: Groupe Jean Coutu, the J.W. McConnell Family Foundation, Scotiabank and Sun Life Financial. For more information visit:www.actfoundation.ca.

Ottawa student to be honoured for rescuing brother

Ottawa student to be honoured for rescuing brother

ACT Foundation and Kiwanis Club of Ottawa Medical Foundation honour student rescuer and celebrate reaching fundraising goal of Dollars for Mannequins Campaign for Ottawa high schools

OTTAWA, Ontario, April 22, 2005 — The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation of Canada and the Kiwanis Club of Ottawa Medical Foundation have many reasons to celebrate today. Their longstanding partnership has resulted in another dramatic rescue and they have met the fundraising goal they established through the Dollars for Mannequins Campaign, which will result in every Ottawa high school receiving the mannequins required to teach CPR to students.

Twenty-year-old Suzy Ayach learned CPR several years ago as a student at Nepean High School. When her 11-year-old brother Nour began choking at the dinner table one evening last September, she reacted quickly, using the skills she learned in high school and saved his life. Suzy will be honoured by the ACT Foundation and the Kiwanis Club of Ottawa Medical Foundation for her courage and quick action, today, at 1:00 p.m. in the Champlain Room of the Delta Ottawa Hotel. Suzy and her brother will also take part in a dramatic reenactment of a cardiac arrest situation.

The ACT Foundation brought CPR training to Suzy’s school with the help of the Kiwanis Club of Ottawa Medical Foundation in 1994, as a part of the original pilot of the ACT High School CPR Program in Ottawa. At that time, 32 Ottawa high schools received mannequins and teacher training to be able to deliver the CPR course to their students, through a donation of $62,500 for 800 mannequins from the Kiwanis Club of Ottawa Medical Foundation. The pilot was so successful, that ACT has since brought the CPR program to over 700 high schools across Canada. To date, over 700,000 Canadian youth have been trained in the lifesaving skills of CPR through the ACT High School CPR Program.

Building upon the success of the Ottawa pilot, ACT recently teamed up with the Kiwanis Club of Ottawa Medical Foundation to launch the Dollars for Mannequins Campaign. Aimed at the local business community, the campaign was jumpstarted with a $12,000 donation from the Kiwanis Club of Ottawa Medical Foundation. Response was tremendous, with 39 Ottawa businesses donating mannequins to local schools. Among these businesses is gold sponsor Hydro Ottawa and silver sponsor Ferano Construction Ltd.
“This is a proud day for the ACT Foundation. We are extremely pleased to honour Suzy Ayach for saving her brother’s life,” said Sandra Clarke, Executive Director of the ACT Foundation. “We are also thrilled to announce the success of the Dollars for Mannequins Campaign, due in great part to the leadership of the Kiwanis Club of Ottawa Medical Foundation.”

Research indicates that CPR response by citizens can improve the out-of-hospital survival rate for cardiac arrest almost fourfold. With 85% of cardiac arrests occurring at home, empowering youth with CPR training as part of their high school education will help increase citizen CPR response rates over the long term.

“This program will empower kids with CPR as a life skill,” says Dr. Justin Maloney, Base Hospital Program Medical Director, Ottawa Hospital. “Not only will they learn how to do CPR, they will learn how to recognize a developing cardiac emergency, the importance of calling 911 quickly and how to assist while waiting for the paramedics. This is important information they will carry with them to their present and future familes.”

About the ACT Foundation
The ACT Foundation is a national, non-profit organization dedicated to establishing CPR as a mandatory program in every Canadian high school. ACT raises funds for CPR mannequins for schools and guides schools in program set-up.

The ACT Foundation’s corporate health partners are companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca; Pfizer Canada and sanofi-aventis. They provide ACT’s sustaining funding and are committed to the foundation’s national goal of empowering youth to save lives. In Ontario, the Government of Ontario, Hydro One and the Ontario Trillium Foundation are provincial funding partners. Kiwanis service clubs play a key role as program partners at the community level. For more information visit: www.actfoundation.ca.

Windsor-area students to be empowered to save lives

Windsor-area students to be empowered to save lives

WINDSOR, Ontario, February 25, 2005 — Windsor-area high schools will be equipped to empower students to save lives through a new program launched by the Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation of Canada with the support of the Ontario government, DaimlerChrysler Canada and the Canadian Auto Workers-Local 444. Launched today at F.J. Brennan High School, the program will see 5,900 local Grade 9 students from 30 high schools being trained every year in the lifesaving skills of CPR.

The program is the result of a provincial partnership between the ACT Foundation and the Ontario government, through which the province has committed half the funds to set up the ACT High School CPR Program in Ontario communities through a public-private matching funds model. Representing the Ontario government at today’s event was local MPP and Minister of Energy Dwight Duncan.

“Training youth to save lives is an important investment into the health of our community,” said Minister Duncan. “The ACT program creates an opportunity for Windsor and Essex youth to invest in a valuable skill; a skill that could one day save your life or mine.”

In Windsor, DaimlerChrysler Canada and the Canadian Auto Workers-Local 444 responded to ACT’s search for partners and are matching the Ontario government funding. Together with the Ontario government, these partners donated 870 mannequins to local high schools and have assured physical education teachers are trained to deliver the CPR course to their students.

“We are pleased to partner with the ACT Foundation, the provincial government, and the CAW to give students the opportunity to learn lifesaving techniques through the CPR program,” said Mark Gendregske, Vice President-Human Resources of DaimlerChrysler Canada Inc. “We know how important it is to have CPR-trained employees. These lifesaving skills will now be shared with approximately 5,900 students and could potentially save the lives of our family and friends.”

Through the ACT High School CPR Program, every Grade 9 student in the three local school boards (Conseil scolaire des écoles catholiques de district du sud-ouest, Greater Essex County District School Board and Windsor-Essex Catholic District School Board) will be prepared to help a parent or grandparent should they experience a heart attack; a brother, sister or child they are babysitting should they choke; or a friend involved in a drowning emergency.

The ACT Foundation has brought together partners to donate the resources required for teachers to deliver the program.

“This community support is a tremendous boost to ACT’s efforts in Ontario, as we endeavor to bring our CPR program to all Ontario high schools.” said ACT Foundation Executive Director Sandra Clarke. “This lifesaving program is simply not possible without this kind of corporate funding for training mannequins needed by schools.”

Research indicates that CPR response by citizens can improve the out-of-hospital survival rate for cardiac arrest almost fourfold. With 85% of cardiac arrests occurring at home, empowering youth with CPR training as part of their high school education will help increase citizen CPR response rates over the long term.

To date, the ACT Foundation has fundraised for mannequins bringing the program to half of Ontario high schools. Due to the tremendous demand for this program, the Ontario government has made a commitment of funds as part of a matching funding formula to help the ACT Foundation raise the remaining funds needed to expand the program to all Ontario high schools. Once implemented in all Ontario high schools, 155,000 Grade 9 students will be trained in the lifesaving skill of CPR every year.
About the ACT Foundation
The ACT Foundation is a national, non-profit organization dedicated to establishing CPR as a mandatory program in every Canadian high school. ACT raises funds for CPR mannequins for schools and guides schools in program set-up. The foundation has already established the CPR program in over 700 high schools across Canada. By the end of the 2004-2005 school year, over 700,000 Canadian students will have been trained to date through this program.

The ACT Foundation’s corporate health partners are companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca; Aventis Pharma Inc., a member of the sanofi-aventis Group; and Pfizer Canada. They provide ACT’s sustaining funding and are committed to the foundation’s national goal of empowering youth to save lives. In Ontario, Hydro One and the Ontario Trillium Foundation are provincial funding partners and the Kiwanis service clubs play a key role as program partners at the community level. For more information visit: www.actfoundation.ca.