BC students empowered to save lives!

BC students empowered to save lives!

VANCOUVER, 28/11/08

The ACT Foundation, in partnership with the British Columbia Ambulance Service and the Ambulance Paramedics of British Columbia – CUPE Local 873, is thrilled to announce that 6,500 students in three BC school districts will be empowered to save lives each year, thanks to a generous donation from the Envision Credit Union Charitable Foundation.

“I congratulate the ACT Foundation and their partners for promoting healthy living while empowering students to save lives,” said Mary Polak, Min of Healthy Living and Sport. “CPR is a life saving skill that I would encourage all British Columbians to learn.”

The ACT High School CPR Program will be launched in School District No. 43 Coquitlam and School District No. 35 Langley on Friday Nov. 28 and in School District No. 23 Central Okanagan On Monday Dec. 1. These launches will celebrate CPR Awareness Month and will recognize Envision Credit Union Charitable Foundation for its donation of $65,560 for mannequins and curriculum resources for local schools. This donation is part of a greater commitment of $159,080 that Envision has made to 18 BC communities.

“The mission of the Envision Charitable Foundation is to support initiatives that enhance the quality of life in our communities,” explains Seline Kutan, Executive Director of the Envision Charitable Foundation. “There’s no question that equipping our youth with the skills to save people’s lives will help fulfill that mission. It’s exciting to be partnering with the ACT Foundation in bringing CPR training to thousands of students throughout BC.”

Eight in 10 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occur at home and research indicates that citizen CPR can improve survival rates by almost fourfold.

The British Columbia Ambulance Service (BCAS) and its paramedics’ union, the Ambulance Paramedics of British Columbia – CUPE Local 873 (APBC), work in partnership with the ACT Foundation and community partners to bring the ACT High School CPR Program to all BC public secondary schools. To date, the program has been established in 147 BC schools and 83,000 students have been trained.

“It’s estimated that only 15 per cent of British Columbians know CPR,” said BCAS Vice-President of Medical Programs Dr. Jim Christenson. “Even with the best technology, medical expertise and timely deployment of first responders, the best chance for someone in cardiac arrest is still to have a bystander perform CPR until paramedics can provide professional CPR and defibrillation.”
BCAS provides ongoing project funding and Ambulance Paramedics of BC volunteer their time to train secondary school teachers to teach CPR to their students.

“By volunteering their time in schools across BC, paramedics will bring this life saving skill to as many students as possible, giving them the confidence to react during an emergency,” said APBC President John Strohmaier. “Our sincere hope is that by supporting young people to become well-versed in CPR we’ll witness more positive outcomes for the thousands of cardiac arrest patients we treat and transport each year.”

The ACT Foundation is a national, award-winning charitable organization dedicated to promoting health and empowering Canadians to save lives. ACT’s national partners are AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb Canada, Pfizer Canada and sanofi-aventis. They provide sustaining funding and are committed to the Foundation’s goal of establishing CPR as a mandatory program in every Canadian high school.

“We are thrilled with the support of ACT’s partners. Without them, the program would not be possible,” says ACT Foundation Executive Director Sandra Clarke.

For more information visit: www.actfoundation.ca .

Ontario invests in defibrillator training for youth

Ontario invests in defibrillator training for youth

TORONTO, ON, 29/09/08

The Government of Ontario is empowering youth to save lives through a major commitment to the ACT Foundation to support the establishment of defibrillator training in Ontario high schools, a first in .

A $1.4 million investment from the province will help the Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation train teachers to teach students how to use an automated external defibrillator (AED). It will support the placement of defibrillators in Ontario high schools and the purchase of mannequins and other training materials. An unprecedented number of young people will be trained through this initiative.

“This is a valuable learning opportunity for students — and can help our communities. Young people who are trained and ready to act could save a life,” says Education Minister Kathleen Wynne.

The ACT Foundation launched an AED pilot project in 2007 involving six Ottawa high schools. Teachers were trained to teach students how to save lives with a defibrillator as an enhancement to their CPR training. Bolstered by today’s announcement, the ACT Foundation will begin to expand the successful Ottawa model throughout Ontario and will be fundraising to find the remaining funds needed to expand this program province wide.

“This important investment will act as powerful leverage in our efforts to find the funds needed at the community level throughout Ontario ,” says Sandra Clarke , Executive Director of the ACT Foundation . “This wonderful public/private partnership model will propel this program forward.”

About 40,000 Canadians experience cardiac arrest each year, 80% outside of hospital, according to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada. An AED can tell when a heart stops beating effectively and deliver an electric shock to help restart the heart. Using this machine along with CPR can improve cardiac arrest survival rates by up to 50 per cent when used in the first few minutes. Young people trained to perform CPR and to use a defibrillator can help save lives at the scene of a cardiac arrest.

“Easy-to-use defibrillators are appearing in many public places,” says Dr. Justin Maloney , an emergency physician and Medical Director for the ACT Foundation . “The schools already teach young people to act, to start CPR. Now we want them to grab the defibrillator on the wall and use that too. Schools are teaching life skills that save lives.”

The Government of Ontario’s investment in AED training builds on its 2004 commitment to the ACT Foundation in support of the establishment of CPR training in Ontario high schools. Today’s announcement will see AED added as an enhancement to the CPR program.

ACT’s efforts are strengthened by the support of its national health partners who provide sustaining funding for the organization and are committed to the high school CPR and AED program. They are: AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb , Pfizer and sanofi-aventis.

Key partners at the provincial level who have provided support for establishment of the CPR Program in Ontario high schools are Hydro One, Shoppers Drug Mart, and The Ontario Trillium Foundation.

Background on the ACT Foundation’s original Ottawa pilot of the High School AED Program

The ACT Foundation launched a high school AED pilot project in 2007 involving six Ottawa high schools representing both the Ottawa Carleton District School Board and the Ottawa Carleton Catholic District School Board. The 6 schools are: Glebe Collegiate, Hillcrest High School , Immaculata High School , St. Mark’s High School, Sir Wilfred Laurier Secondary, and West Carleton Secondary School . Community partners include the Ottawa Paramedic Service, the Ottawa Base Hospital , the Ottawa Senators Foundation, and the Maharaja’s Ball. The Ottawa pilot provides a model for Ontario high schools.

About the ACT Foundation

The ACT Foundation is a national, award-winning charitable organization dedicated to promoting health and empowering Canadians to save lives. ACT is driving a national campaign to establish CPR as a mandatory program in every Canadian high school. ACT raises funds for CPR mannequins for schools and guides schools in program set up. The Foundation has already established the CPR program in over 1,200 high schools across and over 900,000 youth have been trained to date. The Foundation and its core partners are winners of Imagine ’s “New Spirit of Community Partnership” Award. Core partners are companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb , Pfizer and sanofi-aventis. They provide ACT’s sustaining funding and are committed to the Foundation’s national goal of promoting health and empowering Canadians to save lives.

For more information visit: www.actfoundation.ca.

Howe Sound teachers to empower students with CPR and heart health educati

Howe Sound teachers to empower students with CPR and heart health education

HOWE SOUND, B.C., 25/06/08

June 25 will see nearly 15 teachers from School District No. 48 Howe Sound trained to empower their students with lifesaving CPR and heart health education all year long through the award-winning ACT High School CPR Program.

Teachers from Don Ross Secondary School, Howe Sound Secondary School, Pemberton Secondary School, and Whistler Secondary School will participate in the ACT High School CPR Teacher Training Workshop at Howe Sound Secondary School, 38430 Buckley Avenue. This training will enable the teachers to empower almost 400 local youth with CPR each year.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment Foundation in partnership with the British Columbia Ambulance Service (BCAS) and the Ambulance Paramedics of BC (APBC) is working to bring the ACT High School CPR Program to all B.C. youth. In School District No. 48, ACT is receiving funding from lead community partner RBC. Thanks to a grant of $15,000, the secondary schools in School District No. 48 Howe Sound will receive curriculum materials as well as a total of 105 CPR mannequins.

“At RBC we believe in supporting the health and wellness of local communities and see great value in training young people in this area,” says Jaason Morton, Squamish RBC Branch Manager. “We’re proud to support the ACT Foundation and hope high school students attending the CPR training program in Howe Sound will be equipped with new skills and confidence to deal with emergency situations.”

The ACT High School CPR Program is built on a strong community-based model of partnerships and support, whereby ACT helps communities find local partners who donate the mannequins, curriculum materials, and teacher training that schools need to set up the program. Secondary school teachers then teach CPR to their students as a regular part of the curriculum, reaching all youth prior to graduation. In B.C., ACT is partnering with BCAS and APBC to establish the program in all B.C. public secondary schools. Full implementation in this province will see approximately 50,000 youth trained in CPR annually.

Teacher training in B.C. is provided by local paramedics, who volunteer their time to prepare teachers to teach the program to their students. The June 25 teacher training is being provided by BJ Chute, APBC Director of Public Education and CPR instructor. The ACT High School Program is supported at the national level by companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb Canada, Pfizer Canada and sanofi-aventis.

Cardiovascular disease is the second leading cause of death and accounts for more than one fifth of all deaths in B.C. Research indicates citizen CPR response can improve survival rate for victims of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest by almost fourfold. With eight in 10 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occurring at home, empowering youth with CPR training as part of their high school education will help increase citizen CPR response rates over the long term.

“It’s estimated that only 15 per cent of British Columbians know CPR,” said BCAS Vice-President of Medical Programs Dr. Jim Christenson. “Even with the best technology, medical expertise and timely deployment of first responders, the best chance for someone in cardiac arrest is still to have a bystander perform CPR until paramedics can provide professional CPR and defibrillation.”

In addition to empowering youth to save lives, the ACT Program has a strong health promotion message, says Sandra Clarke, Executive Director of the ACT Foundation. “Students learn about risk factors for heart disease and the importance of adopting heart healthy lifestyle behaviors at a young age. They will then bring their health promotion message and lifesaving skills to their present and future families,” says Clarke.

To date, the ACT Foundation has set up the ACT High School CPR Program in over 1,200 schools nation-wide, empowering over 900,000 youth to save lives.

About the ACT Foundation
The ACT Foundation is a national, award-winning charitable organization dedicated to promoting health and empowering Canadians to save lives. ACT is driving a national campaign to establish CPR as a mandatory program in every Canadian high school. ACT raises funds for CPR mannequins for schools and guides schools in program set up. The Foundation and its core partners are winners of Imagine Canada’s “New Spirit of Community Partnership” Award. Core partners are companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb Canada, Pfizer Canada and sanofi-aventis. They provide ACT’s sustaining funding and are committed to the Foundation’s national goal of promoting health and empowering Canadians to save lives. For more information visit: www.actfoundation.ca.

Mission teachers to empower local students to save lives

Mission teachers to empower local students to save lives

MISSION, B.C. , 25/06/08

June 25 will see nearly 20 teachers from School District No. 75 Mission trained to empower their students with lifesaving CPR and heart health education all year long through the award-winning ACT High School CPR Program.

Teachers from Hatzic Secondary School, Heritage Park Secondary School, and Mission Secondary School will participate in the ACT High School CPR Teacher Training Workshop at Mission Secondary School, 32939-7th Ave. This training will enable the teachers to empower 500 local youth with CPR each year.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment Foundation in partnership with the British Columbia Ambulance Service (BCAS) and the Ambulance Paramedics of BC (APBC) is working to bring the ACT High School CPR Program to all B.C. youth. In School District No. 75 Mission, ACT is receiving funding from lead community partner Envision Credit Union Charitable Foundation. Thanks to a grant of over $55,000, each participating secondary school in Mission, Delta, Maple Ridge and Pitt Meadows will receive curriculum materials as well as a class set of 30 CPR mannequins.

“The ACT Foundation has already set up the CPR program in more than 1,200 schools across Canada,” explains Sally O’Sullivan, chair of the Envision Credit Union Charitable Foundation. “This grant will enable them to expand the program within B.C. so that more students can be trained in this life-saving skill. The goal is to see every B.C. high school student graduate with the skills and knowledge they need to save lives.”

The ACT High School CPR Program is built on a strong community-based model of partnerships and support, whereby ACT helps communities find local partners who donate the mannequins, curriculum materials, and teacher training that schools need to set up the program. Secondary school teachers then teach CPR to their students as a regular part of the curriculum, reaching all youth prior to graduation. In B.C., ACT is partnering with BCAS and APBC to establish the program in all B.C. public secondary schools. Full implementation in this province will see approximately 50,000 youth trained in CPR annually.

Teacher training in B.C. is provided by local paramedics, who volunteer their time to prepare teachers to teach the program to their students. The June 19 teacher training is being provided by Paul Linza and Troy Geinger, APBC Paramedics and CPR instructors. The ACT High School Program is supported at the national level by companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb Canada, Pfizer Canada and sanofi-aventis.

Cardiovascular disease is the second leading cause of death and accounts for more than one fifth of all deaths in B.C. Research indicates citizen CPR response can improve survival rate for victims of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest by almost fourfold. With eight in 10 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occurring at home, empowering youth with CPR training as part of their high school education will help increase citizen CPR response rates over the long term.

“It’s estimated that only 15 per cent of British Columbians know CPR,” said BCAS Vice-President of Medical Programs Dr. Jim Christenson. “Even with the best technology, medical expertise and timely deployment of first responders, the best chance for someone in cardiac arrest is still to have a bystander perform CPR until paramedics can provide professional CPR and defibrillation.”

In addition to empowering youth to save lives, the ACT Program has a strong health promotion message, says Sandra Clarke, Executive Director of the ACT Foundation. “Students learn about risk factors for heart disease and the importance of adopting heart healthy lifestyle behaviors at a young age. They will then bring their health promotion message and lifesaving skills to their present and future families,” says Clarke.

To date, the ACT Foundation has set up the ACT High School CPR Program in over 1,200 schools nation-wide, empowering over 900,000 youth to save lives.

About the ACT Foundation
The ACT Foundation is a national, award-winning charitable organization dedicated to promoting health and empowering Canadians to save lives. ACT is driving a national campaign to establish CPR as a mandatory program in every Canadian high school. ACT raises funds for CPR mannequins for schools and guides schools in program set up. The Foundation and its core partners are winners of Imagine Canada’s “New Spirit of Community Partnership” Award. Core partners are companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb Canada, Pfizer Canada and sanofi-aventis. They provide ACT’s sustaining funding and are committed to the Foundation’s national goal of promoting health and empowering Canadians to save lives. For more information visit: www.actfoundation.ca.

Abbotsford teachers to empower students to save lives

Abbotsford teachers to empower students to save lives

ABBOTSFORD, B.C., 24/06/08

June 24 will see nearly 20 teachers from School District No. 34 Abbotsford trained to empower their students with lifesaving CPR and heart health education all year long through the award-winning ACT High School CPR Program.

Teachers from Abbotsford Collegiate, Abbotsford Traditional Secondary School, Rick Hansen Secondary School, Robert Bateman Secondary School, W. J. Mouat Secondary School, Yale Secondary School and St. John Brebeuf Regional Secondary School will participate in the ACT High School CPR Teacher Training Workshop at Rick Hansen Secondary School, 31150 Blueridge Drive. This training will enable the teachers to empower over 1,300 local youth with CPR each year.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment Foundation in partnership with the British Columbia Ambulance Service (BCAS) and the Ambulance Paramedics of BC (APBC) is working to bring the ACT High School CPR Program to all B.C. youth. In School District No. 34, ACT is receiving funding from Lead Community Partner Envision Credit Union Charitable Foundation. Thanks to a grant of nearly $52,000, each participating secondary school in Abbotsford, Chilliwack, and Central Okanagan will receive curriculum materials as well as a class set of 30 CPR mannequins.

“The ACT Foundation has already set up the CPR program in more than 1,200 schools across Canada,” explains Sally O’Sullivan, chair of the Envision Credit Union Charitable Foundation. “This grant will enable them to expand the program within B.C. so that more students can be trained in this life-saving skill. The goal is to see every B.C. high school student graduate with the skills and knowledge they need to save lives.”

The ACT High School CPR Program is built on a strong community-based model of partnerships and support, whereby ACT helps communities find local partners who donate the mannequins, curriculum materials, and teacher training that schools need to set up the program. Secondary school teachers then teach CPR to their students as a regular part of the curriculum, reaching all youth prior to graduation. In B.C., ACT is partnering with BCAS and APBC to establish the program in all B.C. public secondary schools. Full implementation in this province will see approximately 50,000 youth trained in CPR annually.

Teacher training in B.C. is provided by local paramedics, who volunteer their time to prepare teachers to teach the program to their students. The June 24 teacher training is being provided by Paul Linza and Troy Geinger, APBC Paramedics and CPR instructors. The ACT High School Program is supported at the national level by companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb Canada, Pfizer Canada and sanofi-aventis.

Cardiovascular disease is the second leading cause of death and accounts for more than one fifth of all deaths in B.C. Research indicates citizen CPR response can improve survival rate for victims of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest by almost fourfold. With eight in 10 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occurring at home, empowering youth with CPR training as part of their high school education will help increase citizen CPR response rates over the long term.

“It’s estimated that only 15 per cent of British Columbians know CPR,” said BCAS Vice-President of Medical Programs Dr. Jim Christenson. “Even with the best technology, medical expertise and timely deployment of first responders, the best chance for someone in cardiac arrest is still to have a bystander perform CPR until paramedics can provide professional CPR and defibrillation.”

In addition to empowering youth to save lives, the ACT Program has a strong health promotion message, says Sandra Clarke, Executive Director of the ACT Foundation. “Students learn about risk factors for heart disease and the importance of adopting heart healthy lifestyle behaviors at a young age. They will then bring their health promotion message and lifesaving skills to their present and future families,” says Clarke.

To date, the ACT Foundation has set up the ACT High School CPR Program in over 1,200 schools nation-wide, empowering over 900,000 youth to save lives.

About the ACT Foundation
The ACT Foundation is a national, award-winning charitable organization dedicated to promoting health and empowering Canadians to save lives. ACT is driving a national campaign to establish CPR as a mandatory program in every Canadian high school. ACT raises funds for CPR mannequins for schools and guides schools in program set up. The Foundation and its core partners are winners of Imagine Canada’s “New Spirit of Community Partnership” Award. Core partners are companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb Canada, Pfizer Canada and sanofi-aventis. They provide ACT’s sustaining funding and are committed to the Foundation’s national goal of promoting health and empowering Canadians to save lives. For more information visit: www.actfoundation.ca.

Prince George teachers to empower students to save lives

Prince George teachers to empower students to save lives

PRINCE GEORGE, B.C., 24/06/08

June 24 and June 25 will see 50 teachers from School District No. 57 Prince George trained to empower over 900 local students with lifesaving CPR and heart health education through the award-winning ACT High School CPR Program.

Teachers from College Heights Secondary School, D. P. Todd Secondary School, Duchess Park Secondary School, John McInnis Jr Secondary School, Lakewood Junior Secondary School, Mackenzie Secondary School, and Prince George Secondary School, will participate in the ACT High School CPR Teacher Training Workshop on June 24 at Prince George Secondary School, 2901 Griffiths Ave.

Teachers from McBride Secondary School and Valemount Secondary School will participate in the ACT High School CPR Teacher Training Workshop on June 25 at Valemount Secondary School, 1300 – 6th Avenue.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment Foundation in partnership with the British Columbia Ambulance Service (BCAS) and the Ambulance Paramedics of BC (APBC) is working to bring the ACT High School CPR Program to all B.C. youth. In School District No. 57 Prince George, ACT is receiving funding from lead community partner RBC. Thanks to a grant of $20,000, the school district will receive curriculum materials and a total of 160 CPR mannequins.

“At RBC we believe in supporting the health and wellness of local communities and see great value in training young people in this area,” says Don Kehler, Vice President, Commercial Banking. “We’re proud to support the ACT Foundation and hope high school students attending the CPR training program in Prince George will be equipped with new skills and confidence to deal with emergency situations.”

The ACT High School CPR Program is built on a strong community-based model of partnerships and support, whereby ACT helps communities find local partners who donate the mannequins, curriculum materials, and teacher training that schools need to set up the program. Secondary school teachers then teach CPR to their students as a regular part of the curriculum, reaching all youth prior to graduation. In B.C., ACT is partnering with BCAS and APBC to establish the program in all B.C. public secondary schools. Full implementation in this province will see approximately 50,000 youth trained in CPR annually.

Teacher training in B.C. is provided by local paramedics, who volunteer their time to prepare teachers to teach the program to their students. The Prince George school district training is being provided by Karly Jones, Laura Harding and Randy Kilba and Felizbela Janum, APBC paramedics and CPR instructors. The ACT High School Program is supported at the national level by companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb Canada, Pfizer Canada and sanofi-aventis.

Cardiovascular disease is the second leading cause of death and accounts for more than one fifth of all deaths in B.C. Research indicates citizen CPR response can improve survival rate for victims of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest by almost fourfold. With eight in 10 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occurring at home, empowering youth with CPR training as part of their high school education will help increase citizen CPR response rates over the long term.

“It’s estimated that only 15 per cent of British Columbians know CPR,” said BCAS Vice-President of Medical Programs Dr. Jim Christenson. “Even with the best technology, medical expertise and timely deployment of first responders, the best chance for someone in cardiac arrest is still to have a bystander perform CPR until paramedics can provide professional CPR and defibrillation.”

In addition to empowering youth to save lives, the ACT Program has a strong health promotion message, says Sandra Clarke, Executive Director of the ACT Foundation. “Students learn about risk factors for heart disease and the importance of adopting heart healthy lifestyle behaviors at a young age. They will then bring their health promotion message and lifesaving skills to their present and future families,” says Clarke.

To date, the ACT Foundation has set up the ACT High School CPR Program in over 1,200 schools nation-wide, empowering over 900,000 youth to save lives.

About the ACT Foundation
The ACT Foundation is a national, award-winning charitable organization dedicated to promoting health and empowering Canadians to save lives. ACT is driving a national campaign to establish CPR as a mandatory program in every Canadian high school. ACT raises funds for CPR mannequins for schools and guides schools in program set up. The Foundation and its core partners are winners of Imagine Canada’s “New Spirit of Community Partnership” Award. Core partners are companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb Canada, Pfizer Canada and sanofi-aventis. They provide ACT’s sustaining funding and are committed to the Foundation’s national goal of promoting health and empowering Canadians to save lives. For more information visit: www.actfoundation.ca.

Delta teachers to empower local students with CPR and heart health education

Delta teachers to empower local students with CPR and heart health education

DELTA, B.C., 23/06/08

June 23 will see more than 20 teachers from School District No. 37 Delta trained to empower their students with lifesaving CPR and heart health education all year long through the award-winning ACT High School CPR Program.

Teachers from Burnsview Secondary School, Delta Secondary School, Delview Secondary School, North Delta Secondary School, Sands Secondary School, Seaquam Secondary School, and South Delta Secondary School will participate in the ACT High School CPR Teacher Training Workshop at Delta Secondary School, 4615 – 51st Street. This training will enable the teachers to empower over 1,500 local youth with CPR each year.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment Foundation in partnership with the British Columbia Ambulance Service (BCAS) and the Ambulance Paramedics of BC (APBC) is working to bring the ACT High School CPR Program to all B.C. youth. In School District No. 37, ACT is receiving funding from lead community partner Envision Credit Union Charitable Foundation. Thanks to a grant of over $55,000, each participating secondary school in Delta, Maple Ridge, Mission and Pitt Meadows, will receive curriculum materials as well as a class set of 30 CPR mannequins.

“The ACT Foundation has already set up the CPR program in more than 1,200 schools across Canada,” explains Sally O’Sullivan, chair of the Envision Credit Union Charitable Foundation. “This grant will enable them to expand the program within B.C. so that more students can be trained in this life-saving skill. The goal is to see every B.C. high school student graduate with the skills and knowledge they need to save lives.”

The ACT High School CPR Program is built on a strong community-based model of partnerships and support, whereby ACT helps communities find local partners who donate the mannequins, curriculum materials, and teacher training that schools need to set up the program. Secondary school teachers then teach CPR to their students as a regular part of the curriculum, reaching all youth prior to graduation.

In B.C., ACT is partnering with BCAS and APBC to establish the program in all B.C. public secondary schools. Full implementation in this province will see approximately 50,000 youth trained in CPR annually. Teacher training in B.C. is provided by local paramedics who volunteer their time to prepare teachers to teach the program to their students.

The June 23 teacher training is being provided by Troy Geinger, Trevor Zechel and Virginia Kronstein, APBC paramedics and CPR Instructors. The ACT High School Program is supported at the national level by companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb Canada, Pfizer Canada and sanofi-aventis.

Cardiovascular disease is the second leading cause of death and accounts for more than one fifth of all deaths in B.C. Research indicates citizen CPR response can improve survival rate for victims of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest by almost fourfold. With eight in 10 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occurring at home, empowering youth with CPR training as part of their high school education will help increase citizen CPR response rates over the long term.

“It’s estimated that only 15 per cent of British Columbians know CPR,” said BCAS Vice-President of Medical Programs Dr. Jim Christenson. “Even with the best technology, medical expertise and timely deployment of first responders, the best chance for someone in cardiac arrest is still to have a bystander perform CPR until paramedics can provide professional CPR and defibrillation.”

In addition to empowering youth to save lives, the ACT Program has a strong health promotion message, says Sandra Clarke, Executive Director of the ACT Foundation. “Students learn about risk factors for heart disease and the importance of adopting heart healthy lifestyle behaviors at a young age. They will then bring their health promotion message and lifesaving skills to their present and future families,” says Clarke.

To date, the ACT Foundation has set up the ACT High School CPR Program in over 1,200 schools nation-wide, empowering over 900,000 youth to save lives.

About the ACT Foundation
The ACT Foundation is a national, award-winning charitable organization dedicated to promoting health and empowering Canadians to save lives. ACT is driving a national campaign to establish CPR as a mandatory program in every Canadian high school. ACT raises funds for CPR mannequins for schools and guides schools in program set up. The Foundation and its core partners are winners of Imagine Canada’s “New Spirit of Community Partnership” Award. Core partners are companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb Canada, Pfizer Canada and sanofi-aventis. They provide ACT’s sustaining funding and are committed to the Foundation’s national goal of promoting health and empowering Canadians to save lives. For more information visit: www.actfoundation.ca.

Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows teachers to empower local students to save lives

Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows teachers to empower local students to save lives

MAPLE RIDGE-PITT MEADOWS, B.C. , 19/06/08

June 19 will see nearly 30 teachers from School District No. 42 trained to empower their students with lifesaving CPR and heart health education all year long through the award-winning ACT High School CPR Program.

Teachers from Garibaldi Secondary School, Maple Ridge Secondary School, Pitt Meadows Secondary School, Samuel Robertson Technical Secondary School, Thomas Haney Secondary School and Westview Secondary School will participate in the ACT High School CPR Teacher Training Workshop at Westview Secondary School, 20905 Wicklund Ave. This training will enable them to empower over 1,300 local youth with CPR each year.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment Foundation in partnership with the British Columbia Ambulance Service (BCAS) and the Ambulance Paramedics of BC (APBC) is working to bring the ACT High School CPR Program to all B.C. youth. In School District No. 42, ACT is receiving funding from Lead Community Partner Envision Credit Union Charitable Foundation. Thanks to a grant of over $55,000, each participating secondary school in Maple Ridge, Pitt Meadows, Delta, and Mission will receive curriculum materials as well as a class set of 30 CPR mannequins.

“The ACT Foundation has already set up the CPR program in more than 1,200 schools across Canada,” explains Sally O’Sullivan, chair of the Envision Credit Union Charitable Foundation. “This grant will enable them to expand the program within B.C. so that more students can be trained in this life-saving skill. The goal is to see every B.C. high school student graduate with the skills and knowledge they need to save lives.”

The ACT High School CPR Program is built on a strong community-based model of partnerships and support, whereby ACT helps communities find local partners who donate the mannequins, curriculum materials, and teacher training that schools need to set up the program. Secondary school teachers then teach CPR to their students as a regular part of the curriculum, reaching all youth prior to graduation.

In B.C., ACT is partnering with BCAS and APBC to establish the program in all B.C. secondary standard schools. Full implementation in this province will see approximately 50,000 youth trained in CPR annually. Teacher training in B.C. is provided by local paramedics, who volunteer their time to prepare teachers to teach the program to their students.

The June 19 teacher training is being provided by Troy Geinger, Dean Badminton and Ian Macdonald, APBC Paramedics and CPR instructors. The ACT High School Program is supported at the national level by companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb Canada, Pfizer Canada and sanofi-aventis.

Cardiovascular disease is the second leading cause of death and accounts for more than one fifth of all deaths in B.C. Research indicates citizen CPR response can improve survival rate for victims of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest by almost fourfold. With eight in 10 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occurring at home, empowering youth with CPR training as part of their high school education will help increase citizen CPR response rates over the long term.

“It’s estimated that only 15 per cent of British Columbians know CPR,” says Dr. Jim Christenson, BCAS Vice-President of Medical Programs. “Even with the best technology, medical expertise and timely deployment of first responders, the best chance for someone in cardiac arrest is still to have a bystander perform CPR until paramedics can provide professional CPR and defibrillation.”

In addition to empowering youth to save lives, the ACT Program has a strong health promotion message, says Sandra Clarke, Executive Director of the ACT Foundation. “Students learn about risk factors for heart disease and the importance of adopting heart healthy lifestyle behaviors at a young age. They will then bring their health promotion message and lifesaving skills to their present and future families,” says Clarke.

To date, the ACT Foundation has set up the ACT High School CPR Program in over 1,200 schools nation-wide, empowering over 900,000 youth to save lives.

About the ACT Foundation
The ACT Foundation is a national, award-winning charitable organization dedicated to promoting health and empowering Canadians to save lives. ACT is driving a national campaign to establish CPR as a mandatory program in every Canadian high school. ACT raises funds for CPR mannequins for schools and guides schools in program set up. The Foundation and its core partners are winners of Imagine Canada’s “New Spirit of Community Partnership” Award. Core partners are companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb Canada, Pfizer Canada and sanofi-aventis. They provide ACT’s sustaining funding and are committed to the Foundation’s national goal of promoting health and empowering Canadians to save lives. For more information visit: www.actfoundation.ca.

Peterborough students to be empowered to save lives

Peterborough students to be empowered to save lives

PETERBOROUGH, ON, 30/05/08

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation, in partnership with TransCanada Corporation as lead community partner, the Government of Ontario, and other provincial partners (Hydro One, Shoppers Drug Mart and The Ontario Trillium Foundation), is launching the ACT High School CPR Program in the Peterborough area. The launch will take place May 30, 2008 at 10:00 a.m. at Adam Scott Collegiate and Vocational Institute, 175 Langton Street.

More than 4,300 Grade 9 students from 23 high schools in the Kawartha Pine Ridge District School Board and the Peterborough Victoria Northumberland and Clarington Catholic District School Board will now be empowered to save lives. Sixty physical education teachers have been trained as CPR instructors and will train their students using 735 mannequins donated to schools. The students will take their life-saving skills to their current and future families and to the local community.

“I am very pleased to see a program such as the ACT CPR High School Program implemented in our schools,” says Peterborough MPP Jeff Leal. “It is so important to teach our kids lifesaving skills. I commend everyone on their hard work and dedication for making this program possible.”

The ACT Foundation is a national charitable organization dedicated to establishing CPR as a mandatory program in every Canadian high school. The ACT High School CPR Program is built on ACT’s award-winning community-based model of partnerships and support. Through this model, ACT raises funds for CPR mannequins for schools and guides schools in program set up. TransCanada Corporation is the lead community partner in the area.

“The health and safety of the public and our employees is one of TransCanada’s top priorities,” says Brian McConaghy, vice-president, TransCanada Community, Safety and Environment. “Because TransCanada does business in the local area, we seized the opportunity to help these young students gain the ability to make a serious contribution to the health and safety of others in their community.”

Eight in 10 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occur at home. Research indicates that citizen CPR response can improve survival rates by almost fourfold. Empowering youth with CPR training as part of their high school education will increase citizen CPR response rates and save lives over the long term.

“I am excited to be partnered with the ACT Foundation in providing the medical oversight to this important and pioneering program,” says Dr. Vince Arcieri, Medical Director for the Central East Prehospital Care Program. “This program will give students a knowledge base and a skill set to handle potentially life threatening situations in a confident and competent manner.”

The ACT Foundation’s goal is to expand the CPR Program to every high school throughout Ontario. To help make this possible, ACT has secured a provincial commitment of $650,000 from the Government of Ontario. Through this public / private funding model, the Foundation seeks matching funds for program resources at the community level.

“We are pleased to participate in this life-saving initiative, and we sincerely appreciate the support provided by ACT and its partners,” notes Sylvia Terpstra, Director of Education for the Kawartha Pine Ridge District School Board.

Provincial partners in Ontario are Hydro One, Shoppers Drug Mart, and The Ontario Trillium Foundation. The ACT Foundation is taking the Ontario model nation-wide, with the support of its national partners, AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb Canada, Pfizer Canada and sanofi-aventis.

“Our secondary school staff and students are benefiting from the generous donation of mannequins, resources and CPR training,” says John Mackle, Director of Education Peterborough Victoria Northumberland and Clarington Catholic District School Board.

About the ACT Foundation
The ACT Foundation is a national, award-winning charitable organization dedicated to promoting health and empowering Canadians to save lives. ACT is driving a national campaign to establish CPR as a mandatory program in every Canadian high school. ACT raises funds for CPR mannequins for schools and guides schools in program set up. The Foundation has already established the CPR program in over 1,200 high schools across Canada and over 900,000 youth have been trained to date. The Foundation and its core partners are winners of Imagine Canada’s “New Spirit of Community Partnership” Award. Core partners are companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb Canada, Pfizer Canada and sanofi-aventis. They provide ACT’s sustaining funding and are committed to the Foundation’s national goal of promoting health and empowering Canadians to save lives.
For more information visit: www.actfoundation.ca.

TELUS supports ACT High School CPR Program in Victoria

TELUS supports ACT High School CPR Program in Victoria

VICTORIA, BC, 05/05/08

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is pleased to announce that TELUS is partnering with ACT and its provincial partners the BC Ambulance Service (BCAS) and the Ambulance Paramedics of BC (APBC) to bring lifesaving CPR training to all Victoria high schools.

TELUS is donating $19,600 as the lead community partner supporting implementation of the ACT High School CPR Program in Victoria-area schools. Thanks to this support, local youth will be empowered with the skills and knowledge to save a life.

“We are thrilled with TELUS’s support as a lead community partner,” says ACT Foundation Executive Director Sandra Clarke. “Without their important contribution, the program in Victoria would not be possible.”

The ACT High School Program is driven by a strong community-based model of partnerships and support. ACT fundraises at the community level to donate the mannequins, the training for teachers to become CPR instructors for their students, and the curriculum resources schools need to set up the program.

The funding from the TELUS Victoria Community Board will be used to buy mannequins which teachers will use to train all Grade 10 students at Belmont Secondary School in Langford, Pacific Secondary School in Colwood, Parkland Secondary School in Sidney, Claremont Secondary in Saanich, Stelly’s Secondary in Central Saanich, and the Saanich Individual Learning Centre.

In April 2005, the BC Ambulance Service (BCAS) and the Ambulance Paramedics of BC (APBC) established a partnership with the ACT Foundation with the goal of bringing the ACT High School CPR Program to all BC public secondary schools by 2010.

Volunteer BC Ambulance Service Paramedic CPR instructors train teachers. Teachers will then train hundreds of local Grade 10 students to perform CPR until professionals arrive.

Research indicates citizen CPR response can improve survival rate for victims of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest by almost fourfold. With eight in 10 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occurring at home, empowering youth with CPR training as part of their high school education will help increase citizen CPR response rates over the long term.

About the ACT Foundation
The ACT Foundation is a national, award-winning charitable organization dedicated to promoting health and empowering Canadians to save lives. ACT is driving a national campaign to establish CPR as a mandatory program in every Canadian high school. ACT raises funds for CPR mannequins for schools and guides schools in program set up. To date over 900,000 youth have been trained in more than 1,200 high schools across Canada. For more information visit:www.actfoundation.ca. National partners are AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb Canada, Pfizer Canada, and sanofi-aventis.