Longtime supporter of the Calgary ACT High School CPR Program honoured with Community Champion Award

Kiwanis Club member Murray Smith believes all students should know how to react…

Calgary resident and Kiwanis Club member Murray Smith has long been a supporter of CPR training for youth.

The ACT Foundation recently honoured Smith, Chair of the Kiwanis Committee for the ACT High School CPR Program, with a Community Champion Award for his continuous support.

“Murray has played a critical role in both initiating and sustaining the ACT High School CPR Program in Calgary,” said Sandra Clarke, Executive Director of the ACT Foundation. “With his leadership, five Calgary Kiwanis Clubs have provided continuous support for the program, and Murray has always been enthusiastic and willing to help.”

“Murray has believed in this program from the beginning,” said Clarke. “We are delighted to honour him with an ACT Community Champion Award.”

In 2001, under Smith’s leadership, five Kiwanis Clubs of Calgary (Chinook, Downtown, Foothills, Northmount and Metro) helped establish the ACT High School CPR Program in the Calgary Board of Education and the Calgary Roman Catholic School Board. This was done in partnership with the ACT Foundation, Alberta Education, Calgary EMS and the STARS Foundation.

Years later, after thousands of students have been trained, Smith continues to be committed to the program.

In 2007, the Kiwanis Clubs donated an additional $20,000 to replenish training mannequins for 33 Calgary high schools. Thanks to the ongoing support of the Kiwanis Clubs of Calgary, more than 65, 000 Calgary youth have been trained to save a life through the ACT High School CPR Program.

Murray says the reason he supports the program is simple:

“Kiwanis Clubs of Calgary serve the needs of the community where its members live and work. This program empowers young people to assume responsibility and save lives. Everyone in the community benefits,” he said. “One never knows – the life saved may be yours.”

The ACT High School CPR Program was made possible in Calgary thanks to generous community and provincial-level support which enabled the donation of mannequins, teacher training and curriculum resources. Community partners in Calgary are the Kiwanis Clubs of Calgary (Chinook, Downtown, Foothills, Metro and Northmount), while provincial partners of the program are Alberta Education and the STARS Foundation (a founding provincial partner in this province).

Core partners supporting the program in Alberta and throughout Canada are companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb Canada, Pfizer Canada and sanofi-aventis. They provide ACT’s sustaining funding and are committed to the Foundation’s national goal of promoting health and empowering Canadians to save lives.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is an award-winning, national charitable organization dedicated to establishing CPR in high schools across Canada. ACT raises funds to donate mannequins, teacher training, manuals and other materials to schools, and guides schools in program set-up and long-term sustainability. Teachers teach CPR to their students as a regular part of the curriculum. More than 900,000 youth have been trained in CPR through this lifesaving program to date.

Local RCMP officer establishes lifesaving CPR program in remote Labrador community

Constable Peter MacIntyre is ensuring all high school students in his community know how to react…

Thanks to the leadership of RCMP Constable Peter MacIntyre, all high school students in the remote community of Mary’s Harbour, Labrador, are being empowered to save lives.

Like many remote Canadian communities, medical facilities are scarce in the community of Mary’s Harbour, and the nearest ambulance is stationed 50 kilometres away. Local health services consist of one small medical clinic with two nurses on call. So when Constable MacIntyre saw an opportunity to fill this need by training high school students to react in emergencies, he jumped at the chance.

“Coming from a family that has lost people to heart attack, I see firsthand how under-prepared we are as a society to try and help save our friends and loved ones,” said MacIntyre.

MacIntyre recognized the RCMP was in a great position to help the local school coordinate with a CPR trainer to set up the ACT High School CPR Program.

Through a basic Internet search, MacIntyre discovered the ACT Foundation, and approached the national charitable organization to join its campaign to establish CPR in every Canadian high school. He requested resources that would allow him to bring the program to St. Mary’s All Grade School students at no cost to the school.

CPR trainer Ted Rumbolt volunteered to teach the program to every student in Grade 9 through 12, and he said the program was received very well.

“The students were very interested and involved in the material,” says Rumbolt.
But Constable MacIntyre didn’t stop there.

After seeing the success in the program at St. Mary’s All Grade, he worked with ACT to extend the lifesaving program to two more schools in his jurisdiction: DC Young and St Lewis Academy.

More than 100 high school students are being trained each year.

“The CPR trained citizen becomes the critical first link in the emergency response system when an emergency occurs,” said Sandra Clarke, Executive Director of the ACT Foundation.

“With the leadership that Constable MacIntyre, his detachment, and Ted Rumbolt have shown, these CPR trained students can now make the difference between life and death,” she added.

RCMP officers who would like to follow MacIntyre’s lead should visit call the ACT Foundation at 1-800-465-9111.

The ACT High School CPR Program was made possible thanks to the generous support of ACT’s core partners, companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb Canada, Pfizer Canada and sanofi-aventis. They provide ACT’s sustaining funding and are committed to the Foundation’s national goal of promoting health and empowering Canadians to save lives.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is an award-winning, national charitable organization dedicated to establishing CPR in high schools across Canada. ACT raises funds to donate mannequins, teacher training, manuals and other materials to schools and guides schools in program set-up and long-term sustainability. Teachers teach CPR to their students as a regular part of the curriculum. More than 1.4 million youth have been trained in CPR through this lifesaving program to date.

MP for Lanark-Frontenac-Lennox-Addington committed to ACT High School CPR Program

MP Scott Reid believes in the importance of training students to save lives…

Scott Reid, Member of Parliament (MP) for Lanark-Frontnac-Lennox-Addington, is committed to improving emergency preparedness education in rural Ontario communities as a way to assure emergency response rates are competitive with other communities.

As an MP of a rural community, Mr. Reid is familiar with the unique health care issues in rural areas, and has taken an active role in finding solutions to improve the health and emergency preparedness of his community.

Mr. Reid has championed the launch of the high school CPR program in his constituency, outfitting all high schools with the resources required to implement the program (mannequins, teacher training and classroom resources).

“It’s wonderful to be a part of this program. CPR training will do more to save lives in our community than anything else I can think of,” Mr. Reid says.

Thanks to Mr. Reid, almost 3,000 more students now receive this lifesaving training. Mr. Reid has ensured that all high schools in Lanark-Frontenac-Lennox-Addington are now equipped with the program.

Mr. Reid has also greatly contributed to the spread of the ACT High School CPR Program by funding the production of a video to be used in promoting the program in other communities. The video has become a wonderful tool to inform other groups on how they can set up the program in their own communities.

“We’re training our youth to save lives. What could be more important?”

The ACT High School CPR Program was made possible in Lanark-Frontnac-Lennox-Addington thanks to the generous support of ACT’s community partner, MP Scott Reid and provincial partners, including the Government of Ontario, Hydro One and The Ontario Trillium Foundation. Mannequins and curriculum resources were donated to the school and the teachers were trained as CPR instructors for their students.

Also responsible are ACT’s core partners, companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb Canada, Pfizer Canada and sanofi-aventis. They provide ACT’s sustaining funding and are committed to the Foundation’s national goal of promoting health and empowering Canadians to save lives.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is an award-winning, national charitable organization dedicated to establishing CPR in high schools across Canada. ACT raises funds to donate mannequins, teacher training, manuals and other materials to schools and guides schools in program set-up and long-term sustainability. Teachers teach CPR to their students as a regular part of the curriculum. More than 900,000 youth have been trained in CPR through this lifesaving program to date.

Nova Scotia pharmacist brings CPR to his community

John McNeil says CPR empowers people to save lives…

John McNeil is a great example of a pharmacist stepping out from behind the counter and taking an active role in his community.

McNeil recently championed the launch of a high school CPR program in his hometown of Sydney, Nova Scotia, and encourages other pharmacists to promote the ACT Foundation program as well.

“For our profession, high school CPR is an ideal program. It’s about empowering people through health education. You can see the results. It raises your public image,” says MacNeil.

McNeil took the idea of ACT’s high school CPR initiative for Sydney schools to his Rotary Club. “They fell all over it,” he says, because the program is of a manageable size and produces tangible results. In the true spirit of community support, the club donated 40 mannequins to the Sherwood Park Education Centre.

As ACT moves the mandatory high school CPR program across Canada, community partners like McNeil play a critical role at the local level.

“So many pharmacists are involved in different organizations. They have contacts that will help them set up the ACT program,” says McNeil. He has sparked interest in the high school CPR initiative among Rotary Clubs of neighboring communities, and his club has now decided to extend their funding to another high school.

“It’s good to give something back to the community,” says McNeil, whose advocacy of high school CPR has become a natural extension of his work in the pharmacy. “This is a great opportunity for pharmacists to make a difference in their communities by empowering local youth to save lives.”

The ACT High School CPR Program was made possible in Sydney thanks to the generous support of ACT’s community partner the Rotary Club of Sydney. Also responsible are ACT’s core partners, companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb Canada, Pfizer Canada and sanofi-aventis. They provide ACT’s sustaining funding and are committed to the Foundation’s national goal of promoting health and empowering Canadians to save lives.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is an award-winning, national charitable organization dedicated to establishing CPR in high schools across Canada. ACT raises funds to donate mannequins, teacher training, manuals and other materials to schools and guides schools in program set-up and long-term sustainability. Teachers teach CPR to their students as a regular part of the curriculum. More than 900,000 youth have been trained in CPR through this lifesaving program to date.

Retired Quebec Director of Education champions ACT High School CPR Program

Ellen Wernecke is known as a person who gets things done. So when the ACT Foundation asked her to champion the high school CPR program in the Lakeshore School Board where she was Director of Education in 1996, she jumped right in.

Ellen had 30 years experience as a principal and teacher. She liked the idea of teaching grade nine students how to intervene and perform CPR in case of a heart attack.

“The kids don’t necessarily feel that great about themselves in that grade, and CPR training is something they enjoy,” she says. When the campaign was rolling, she was spurred on by the letters she received from parents, expressing their support for this high school program.

Now retired, Ellen remains a champion for Montreal’s west-end CPR program and is still involved as an advisor to the ACT Foundation, helping to promote CPR training across the country.

“Many retired educators like myself still volunteer at the schools,” she says, “so they have the ideal opportunity to promote high school CPR.”

The ACT High School CPR Program was made possible in Montreal thanks to the generous support of ACT’s Quebec provincial partners: J.W. McConnell Family Foundation, McKesson Canada, the Quebec Ministry of Health and Social Services, the Quebec Ministry of Education, Recreation and Sports, Scotiabank and Sun Life Financial. Mannequins and curriculum resources were donated to the school and the teachers were trained as CPR instructors for their students.

Also responsible are ACT’s core partners, companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb Canada, Pfizer Canada and sanofi-aventis. They provide ACT’s sustaining funding and are committed to the Foundation’s Quebec Program and national goal of promoting health and empowering Canadians to save lives.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is an award-winning, national charitable organization dedicated to establishing CPR in high schools across Canada. ACT raises funds to donate mannequins, teacher training, manuals and other materials to schools and guides schools in program set-up and long-term sustainability. Teachers teach CPR to their students as a regular part of the curriculum. More than 900,000 youth have been trained in CPR through this lifesaving program to date.

Former Superintendent Gerry Clarke helps bring the ACT High School CPR Program to Ottawa

Gerry Clarke says he has a passion for empowering teens…

Gerry Clarke knew any challenges in promoting Ottawa’s first high school CPR program would be well worth it.

“I have a passion for empowering teens. They want to be leaders, but they need the right kind of training,” says Clarke, Deputy Director of Education for the Ottawa-Carleton Catholic District School Board. “ACT’s program offered that leadership training, by teaching teens to administer CPR training and possibly save a life.”

In 1993, ACT approached Gerry Clarke, then Superintendent of the Ottawa-Carleton Catholic District School Board, for help in bringing high school CPR to all Ottawa school boards. He embraced the project enthusiastically and stimulated support among the area superintendents.

“To make it happen, I knew I had to get commitment from the top,” explains Clarke.
With Clarke championing from within the school board ranks, board officials agreed to add high school CPR to the physical education program, pending community funding for mannequins. The Ottawa Kiwanis Club rose to that challenge and soon donated funds for mannequins for schools. The program kicked off in September 1994.

Clarke did not rest there, but asked researcher Dr. Marilyn Kasian to document the program results. Gathering data from all six school boards, Dr. Kasian found that CPR was one of the most successful units taught in the physical education and health program. These findings helped convince the Ontario Ministry of Education to add CPR to the grade nine curriculum across Ontario.

In a word of advice on high school CPR, Clarke urges: “If you’re interested in championing the high school CPR program locally or at the provincial level, learn how to get to the key decision-makers.”

The ACT High School CPR Program was made possible in Ottawa thanks to the generous support of ACT’s community partner, the Kiwanis Club of Ottawa and provincial partners, including the Government of Ontario, Hydro One and The Ontario Trillium Foundation. Mannequins and curriculum resources were donated to the school and the teachers were trained as CPR instructors for their students.

Also responsible are ACT’s core partners, companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb Canada, Pfizer Canada and sanofi-aventis. They provide ACT’s sustaining funding and are committed to the Foundation’s national goal of promoting health and empowering Canadians to save lives.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is an award-winning, national charitable organization dedicated to establishing CPR in high schools across Canada. ACT raises funds to donate mannequins, teacher training, manuals and other materials to schools and guides schools in program set-up and long-term sustainability. Teachers teach CPR to their students as a regular part of the curriculum. More than 900,000 youth have been trained in CPR through this lifesaving program to date.

Quebec Nurse helps bring ACT High School CPR Program to her teenagers’ school

Shirley Straughton believes everyone should know CPR…

For a lot of reasons, Shirley Straughton believes everyone should know CPR.

For one, Shirley is a cardiac nurse, and knows all too well about heart disease. For another, as the Health Issues Coordinator for the Quebec Federation of Home and School Associations, it’s her goal to see that students receive quality health care education. And finally, as a mother of two teenagers, she felt it was important they learn CPR.

With ACT’s help, Shirley convinced both the Home and School Association and MacDonald High School, where her teenagers study, to endorse high school CPR.

“Definitely, parents benefit when teenagers learn CPR,” Shirley says. “Consider when teenagers are responsible for younger children. Electric shock, allergies, or slipping into a pool can cause cardiac or respiratory failure.”

“ACT’s high school CPR course teaches students all the vital skills,” she says. “My goal is to keep this program going and growing.”

The ACT High School CPR Program was made possible in Montreal thanks to the generous support of ACT’s Quebec provincial partners: J.W. McConnell Family Foundation, McKesson Canada, the Quebec Ministry of Health and Social Services, the Quebec Ministry of Education, Recreation and Sports, Scotiabank and Sun Life Financial. Mannequins and curriculum resources were donated to the school and the teachers were trained as CPR instructors for their students.
Also responsible are ACT’s core partners, companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb Canada, Pfizer Canada and sanofi-aventis. They provide ACT’s sustaining funding and are committed to the Foundation’s Quebec Program and national goal of promoting health and empowering Canadians to save lives.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is an award-winning, national charitable organization dedicated to establishing CPR in high schools across Canada. ACT raises funds to donate mannequins, teacher training, manuals and other materials to schools and guides schools in program set-up and long-term sustainability. Teachers teach CPR to their students as a regular part of the curriculum. More than 900,000 youth have been trained in CPR through this lifesaving program to date.

Prescott-Russell resident helps bring the ACT High School CPR Program to his community

Having worked with an ambulance company in the rural area of Prescott-Russell for about three decades, Rene Berthiaume has been eyewitness to the benefits of CPR training and the tragic results of its absence.

Berthiaume says that when he first started as an ambulance attendant about three decades ago “in the case of heart attacks, most of the time the patient was dead by the time we got there.” Over time, he saw some improvement. “We saw that where CPR courses were started, saves were made.”

In 1995 Dr. Justin Maloney, medical director at the Base Hospital of Ottawa-Carleton, recommended that Berthiaume, then the owner of Noel ambulance services, take the initiative to start up the ACT high school CPR program. He jumped at the opportunity.
“In a rural area it takes longer for ambulances to get there. We as a community have to find solutions,” says Berthiaume.

Soon, thanks to his fluent bilingualism he had English and French school boards working together to set up CPR programs at all eight of the area’s high schools.

With help from his brother Yves Berthiaume, then Vice-President of Optimist International, the schools received the money they needed for mannequins to launch the program. Berthiaume says representatives from the Optimist Club are delighted with the program, and make a point of joining ambulance staff in celebrating the graduation of every CPR class. In fact, just this year the school’s CPR instructor resuscitated a teacher who suffered a cardiac arrest at the local Vankleek Hill Collegiate Institute.

The ACT High School CPR Program was made possible in Prescott-Russell thanks to the generous support of ACT’s community partners, les Clubs Optimistes du district Est ontarien; The Ontario Ambulance Operators’ Association Inc., Services d’ambulances Noël and Hawkesbury Association of Ambulance Attendants. Provincial partners include the Government of Ontario, Hydro One and The Ontario Trillium Foundation. Mannequins and curriculum resources were donated to the school and the teachers were trained as CPR instructors for their students.

Also responsible are ACT’s core partners, companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb Canada, Pfizer Canada and sanofi-aventis. They provide ACT’s sustaining funding and are committed to the Foundation’s national goal of promoting health and empowering Canadians to save lives.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is an award-winning, national charitable organization dedicated to establishing CPR in high schools across Canada. ACT raises funds to donate mannequins, teacher training, manuals and other materials to schools and guides schools in program set-up and long-term sustainability. Teachers teach CPR to their students as a regular part of the curriculum. More than 900,000 youth have been trained in CPR through this lifesaving program to date.