Basketball coach saves student with CPR and an AED

A Grade 10 student is alive today thanks to the quick provision of CPR and the use of an AED by his basketball coach Mike Rowley, of St. Mother Teresa High School. Since 1994, the ACT Foundation has established free High School CPR and AED training Program in over 1,800 high schools across Canada.

Zachary Legault, ‘Zach’ as his friends call him, is an energetic student who loves sports. But at this school year’s basketball tryout – Zach’s heart stopped.

“I was adding names to my team shortlist when I saw a student come off the court hunched over,” says Coach Mike. “It was Zach, and he was gasping for air.” Suddenly Zach collapsed face-first on the floor sending an echoing thud across the gym. “My instincts kicked in. It was the ACT training,” says Mike, who told his Assistant Coach, Yvan, to call 911.

Coach Mike quickly assessed that Zach was unresponsive and not breathing. He began CPR and using the school’s AED, saved his student’s life.

“I can tell you as a mom, receiving the phone call was nothing short of traumatic.  But to hear over and over in the days that followed from paramedics, ER physicians, and the team of cardiologists, that had the coach not responded so quickly performing CPR and using the AED, Zach would not be with us today,” says Stephanie Muldoon, Zach’s mother.

Zach underwent open-heart surgery at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) to fix a previously unknown heart defect he has had since birth. Zach has made a full recovery.

Zach would like to see everyone empowered to save a life. “It can happen to a family member, a friend, it can happen to anyone around you. You wouldn’t expect a young athlete to have a cardiac arrest, but I’m an example of what can happen,” says Zach.

ACT RESCUE VIDEO: Zach’s Story

“The ACT Foundation coordinates the training of thousands of teachers enabling them to train hundreds of thousands of students across Canada every year in lifesaving skills,” says Sandra Clarke, the Foundation’s Executive Director.

“ACT set up the High School CPR Program at St. Mother Teresa High School in 1998, adding the AED training program for students in 2009.”

To date, 8,300 teachers across Canada are trained as CPR instructors for their students and 4.8 million students have learned how to save a life through the ACT High School CPR and Defibrillator Program. Many lives have been saved.

Partner and Community Quotes

AstraZeneca Canada, ACT National Health Partner
Kiersten Combs, President of AstraZeneca Canada
We’re proud to be a long-standing partner of the ACT Foundation – supporting its goal of establishing CPR and defibrillator training in Canadian high schools, providing youth with critical life-saving skills, and raising awareness of the importance of cardiovascular health,” says Kiersten Combs, President of AstraZeneca Canada. “Stories like Zach’s and the quick thinking of his coach Mike Rowley are a great reminder of the impact that initiatives like the ACT High School CPR Program can have by empowering teachers and students to help save lives.”

Amgen Canada, ACT National Health Partner
Dr. Suna Avcil, Executive Medical Director of Amgen Canada
“Amgen is honoured to support the ACT Foundation as a National Health Partner,” says Dr. Suna Avcil, Executive Medical Director of Amgen Canada. “Rescue stories are a testament to the quality of the program and the criticality of ensuring that the education community is equipped with the knowledge and skills to contribute. Together we will continue to advance excellence in science literacy, inspire the next generation, help educators to teach more effectively, and improve access to resources for teachers, students, and society at large.”

Hydro One, ACT Provincial Partner, Ontario
Jay Armitage, Vice President, Marketing & Communications, Hydro One
“We would like to commend Coach Mike for his quick instinct to put his first aid training into action. This real-life rescue demonstrates the importance of equipping young people and their teachers with the lifesaving skills necessary to build safe communities,” said Jay Armitage, Vice President, Marketing & Communications, Hydro One. “Thanks to his CPR and AED training received through the program, Coach Mike had the invaluable tools needed to act fast and save a life.”

Ottawa Catholic School Board, Participating School Board
Tom D’Amico, Director of Education, Ottawa Catholic School Board
“I’m proud of the actions by Coach Mike Rowley. Teachers enter the profession to make a difference in the lives of youth, and in this situation, thanks to his training and the availability of an AED in the school, he was able to save the life of a student athlete.”

About The ACT Foundation

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is the national charitable organization establishing free CPR in Canadian high schools. The program is built on ACT’s award-winning community-based model of partnerships and support, whereby ACT finds local partners who donate the mannequins and AED training units that schools need to deliver the program. High school teachers are trained to teach their students lifesaving skills as a regular part of the curriculum, reaching all youth before graduation. More than 4.8 million youth have been trained in CPR by their teachers through this lifesaving program to date.

The ACT High School CPR and AED Program is made possible with the support of its National Health Partners AstraZeneca Canada and Amgen Canada and its provincial partner Hydro One.

Website:           actfoundation.ca
Twitter:            @actfoundation #ACT2Save
Facebook:        @theactfoundation
Instagram:       @actfoundation
YouTube:          YouTube.com/theactfoundation

The ACT Foundation
Cristiane Doherty, Communications Manager
Mobile: 613-799-9277
cdoherty@actfoundation.ca

 

Basketball coach saves student with CPR and an AED

Zachary, ‘Zach’ as his friends call him, is an energetic Grade 10 student who loves sports, having played competitive hockey and basketball over the years. “No signs of any heart issues EVER in his life,” says Zach’s Mom Stephanie.

However, on October 28 at an after-school basketball tryout – his heart stopped.

“Everything was going well, with students practicing skill drills, and then I asked them to split into playing 5 on 5 games,” recalls teacher and Coach Mike, the OFSAA Boys’ Representative, NCSSAA Convenor, and Boys’ Basketball Coach at St. Mother Teresa High School.

It had been almost two years into the pandemic at that point. Coach Mike hardly knew many of these ‘new’ faces, even more so with their wearing COVID masks while playing basketball.

“I was adding names to my team shortlist when I saw a student come off the court hunched over, says Coach Mike. “It was Zach, and he was gasping for air. At first, I thought it was just the mask and exertion and I told him to take a few minutes on the side while I turned my attention across the gym.”

Suddenly Zach collapsed face-first on the floor sending an echoing thud across the gym that made Mike immediately turn to his aid.

“My instincts kicked in. It was the (ACT) training” says Mike.

“I asked my Assistant Coach, Yvan, to call 911 and clear students out of the gym,” says Mike. “I assessed Zach and started CPR.”

“Coach told me to get the defibrillator right away” recalls Zach’s friend Malacki.

“I ran fast, my friend’s life depended on it. I gave the AED to Coach. He put the pads on Zach and followed the instructions. He knew what to do,” adds Malacki.

In the gym, paramedics took over to revive Zach, continuing to use the school’s AED that had been donated by the ACT Foundation.

“I can tell you as a mom, receiving the phone call was nothing short of traumatic. But to hear over and over in the days that followed from paramedics, ER physicians, and the team of cardiologists, that had the coach not responded so quickly performing CPR and using the AED,  Zach would not be with us today,” says Stephanie. “We are very, very thankful that Coach Mike knew CPR, and that the school had an AED and the Coach was trained in how to use it.  That is what made the difference for Zach.”

Zach underwent open-heart surgery at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) to fix a previously unknown heart defect he has had since birth. Making a full recovery, Zach returned to school in February.

“High schools definitely need to teach CPR,” says Zach. “Most people think that only older people get heart attacks, but look at me, I am living proof that it can happen to anyone. It’s also important to have an AED to make schools safer.”

In the days following Zach’s rescue, Coach Mike suggested that a second AED be installed closer to the gym. The ACT Foundation is working with Zach’s family to help make that donation happen. His mother Stephanie thinks it should be mandated to have an AED in all high schools, especially with all the sports activities. “I would strongly encourage all schools to get one, get an AED now. Do it,” she says. “Because you don’t know until you need one.”

Upon returning to school it was hard for Zach, who had to sit on the sidelines to cheer his teammates. Thanks to the quick lifesaving actions of those around him that night at the try-out, he is able to resume his place on the court with a thumbs up from his health team. Zach is grateful for every precious new day he has ahead. He looks forward to playing sports and driving having successfully acquired another milestone, his license.

ACT RESCUE VIDEO: Zach’s Story

The ACT Foundation set up the High School CPR and AED Program at St. Mother Teresa High School in 1998 for CPR and in 2009 for AED. With the support of community partners, an AED was donated to St. Mother Teresa and Ottawa high schools in 2009.

ACT’s Ontario provincial partner is Hydro One and ACT’s National Health Partners are AstraZeneca Canada, and Amgen Canada.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is the award-winning, national charitable organization establishing free CPR and defibrillator training programs in high schools across Canada. ACT raises funds to donate mannequins and teacher training to schools and guides schools in program set-up and long-term sustainability. More than 4.8 million youth have been trained in CPR by their teachers through this lifesaving program to date.

Governor General Presents Meritorious Service Cross for Empowering Teens to Save Lives

Governor General Julie Payette presented the prestigious Governor General’s Meritorious Service Cross to ACT Foundation.

Governor General Julie Payette presented the prestigious Governor General’s Meritorious Service Cross to ACT Foundation Executive Director and Founder, Sandra Clarke, and ACT’s Medical Director and Ottawa Hospital Emergency Physician, Dr. Justin Maloney at a Rideau Hall ceremony on December 12, 2017. The Award honours Ms. Clarke and Dr. Maloney for their ground-breaking establishment of the ACT (Advanced Coronary Treatment) High School CPR Program.

The Meritorious Service Cross recognizes extraordinary people for their innovative acts which set an example or model for others to follow and bring honour to Canada.

Since 1994, the ACT Foundation’s High School CPR Program has empowered more than 3.9 million students across Canada with CPR training. With 6,700 high school teachers trained as instructors through 1,800 high schools across the country, the continuous sustainability of this program saves lives every day. The program empowers students to ‘act’ in response to a developing emergency health situation and encourages them to become champions for health in their families and communities.

In Canada, an estimated 40,000 cardiac arrests occur outside the hospital each year. Nearly 88% of these incidents occur at home. “CPR is an essential life skill for all Canadians. The High School CPR program stands as tall as any other subject taught in our schools. Recognition from important leaders in Canada suggests they agree,” states Dr. Justin Maloney, an Emergency Physician with the Ottawa Hospital for 38 years and ACT Foundation volunteer Medical Director.

Link to article on CPR rescue of a 17 year-old saving her little sister: https://actfoundation.ca/rescues/lydia-saves-her-five-year-old-sister-during-a-cardiac-arrest/

Link to the many student rescues: https://actfoundation.ca/act-rescues/stories/

“It is humbling and an honour to receive this award. We have made great strides with the dedicated support of staff, partners and the education system since we started the program,” says Sandra Clarke, Executive Director and Founder of the ACT Foundation. “Looking ahead to 2018, we will continue to seek new support from partners to broaden the program. Our goal is to move ACT’s High School CPR Program in to the realm of a national standard by our education system. This will ensure all Canadian youth are empowered with lifesaving training in CPR and the use an automated external defibrillator (AED) to dramatically increase the survival rate of cardiac arrest victims.”
The ACT Foundation is an award-winning national charitable organization that is establishing the free CPR and AED program in Canadian high schools. The program is built on ACT’s community-based model of partnerships and support, where ACT finds local partners who donate mannequins and AED training units that schools need to set up the program. High school teachers then teach CPR and how to use a defibrillator to their students, reaching all youth prior to graduation. ACT’s health partners who are committed to bringing the program across Canada are AstraZeneca Canada, Sanofi Canada, and Amgen Canada.

For further information and interview opportunities, please contact:
Jennifer Edwards
Operations Manager, ACT Foundation
act@actfoundation.ca Tel: 613-286-5260
www.actfoundation.ca YouTube.com/theACTfoundation Facebook/theACTfoundation
Twitter.com/ACTfoundation Instagram.com/theACTfoundation

Photo Credit: MCpl Vincent Carbonneau, Rideau Hall, OSGG

 

Ottawa teen lifeguard saves 3-year-old with CPR

On a sunny and warm Friday afternoon in late June, the wading pool at the Michele Heights Community Centre in Ottawa’s west-end was bustling with activity. Seventeen-year-old Kate was scanning the pool—working her very first shift as a lifeguard—when all of a sudden, she saw a young boy lying face-down in the one-metre deep water.

“As soon as I saw him, I just jumped in the pool,” Kate recalls. As other lifeguards blew their whistles, cleared the pool, and called 911, the three-year-old boy was pulled from the pool and Kate started CPR with the help of a fellow lifeguard. They performed three rounds of CPR and the boy was breathing on his own just before the paramedics arrived. The boy later regained consciousness after being transported to the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO).

Kate credits the ACT High School CPR course she took in Grade 9 at Sacred Heart Catholic High School, and her lifeguard training for preparing her to react at the pool.

Two months later, Kate was recognized for her lifesaving actions when she was presented with the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal by Foreign Affairs Minister and Member of Parliament for Ottawa West-Nepean, John Baird.

Story6-EN

But Kate, who is studying for a Bachelor of Science in Human Kinetics at St. Francis Xavier University, doesn’t see herself as a hero. “I was just really glad that the boy was okay. It could have been anyone doing it. I don’t feel like a hero—I was part of a team. I just happened to be the first one there.”

Kate urges all high school students to learn CPR. “I think it’s a great idea. It is such a useful skill to have and it’s not that difficult, once you’re taught. The more people who know CPR and who know what to do in a situation like that, more lives could be saved.”

The ACT High School CPR Program was set up in Kate’s high school in 2004, thanks to generous community and provincial-level support that enabled the donation of mannequins, teacher training and curriculum resources. The lead community partner in Ottawa is the Kiwanis Club of Ottawa. Provincial partners are the Government of Ontario, Hydro One, and The Ontario Trillium Foundation. The CPR program was enhanced at Kate’s high school with AED training in 2009, thanks to a partnership between the ACT Foundation, the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario, The Sens Foundation, and Mr. Eugene Melnyk.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is the award-winning, national charitable organization establishing free CPR and defibrillator training programs in high schools across Canada. ACT raises funds to donate mannequins and teacher training to schools, and guides schools in program set-up and long-term sustainability. Over 2.6 million youth have been trained in CPR by their teachers through this lifesaving program to date.

ACT’s national health partners supporting the program in Ontario and throughout Canada are AstraZeneca Canada, Pfizer Canada and Sanofi. They provide ACT’s sustaining funding and are committed to the Foundation’s national goal of promoting health and empowering Canadians to save lives.

Ottawa student saves her father’s life

“You turn the light off and go to sleep… the next thing you know, you’re being rushed to the hospital.”

Geoff had been feeling some discomfort for several days. “I wouldn’t call it pain,” explains Geoff. “It was just a sensation — like when your muscles ache when you’re tired. I had that in my arm and in my chest, but it wasn’t persistent.”

On a Monday night, Geoff went to bed as usual. But just after midnight, his wife Dianne was awakened by a sound, as though Geoff was snoring really loudly. “She turned the light on and saw I was gasping for air,” says Geoff. “She quickly called 9-1-1. My daughter heard my wife speaking excitedly on the phone.”

That’s when Alexandria, 17, ran in. “My mom’s on the phone with 9-1-1 and she’s saying ‘Alex, stay calm! Stay calm!’” recalls Alexandria. “The dispatcher asked my mom if she knew CPR. She said ‘No – but my daughter does.’”

Just a few months prior, Alexandria had completed a CPR course at Cairine Wilson Secondary School, which participates in the ACT High School CPR and Defibrillator Program. “It [the training] was still fresh,” she explained.

Alexandria began performing CPR. “My adrenaline was pumping so the compressions didn’t tire me out,” says Alexandria. “When you’re in the moment, you don’t go back and think about your course – you just do it.”

levi quote 3

Alexandria continued with the compressions until EMS arrived. “When I heard them on our staircase, I counted my compressions out loud so they’d know exactly where I was when they walked in.” Geoff was defibrillated then rushed to the hospital for an angioplasty. “Three days later, I was home,” says Geoff. “I feel great!”

Paramedics later commended Alexandria for performing CPR, saying that Geoff is alive today thanks to her actions. “We’re always going to have a special bond between us,” says Alexandria, who composed a heartfelt poem for Geoff’s birthday just one week later. “I’m adopted… so in a way, he saved my life – and now I saved his life.”

As for the CPR techniques that saved Geoff’s life that night: “You can never have too much training,” asserts Geoff, who learned CPR through the military. “You may never need it, but it’s always there to draw upon. You only have to save one life to make it worth it.”

Alexandria readily agrees. “I told my mom and brother they should take a course.” She also advises students to take every opportunity to learn it. “It is definitely worth it!”

The ACT High School CPR Program began as a pilot project in 1994 in Ottawa area schools including Cairine Wilson Secondary School. The donation of mannequins, teacher training and curriculum resources was made possible thanks to generous provincial and community-level support, including that of the Kiwanis Club of Ottawa as the lead community partner for the CPR program.

ACT’s national health partners supporting the program in Ottawa and throughout Canada are: AstraZeneca Canada, Pfizer Canada and Sanofi. They provide ACT’s sustaining funding and are committed to the Foundation’s national goal of promoting health and empowering Canadians to save lives.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is an award-winning, national charitable organization dedicated to establishing CPR and Defibrillator training in high schools across Canada. ACT raises funds to donate mannequins and teacher training to schools, and guides schools in program set-up and long-term sustainability. Over 1.8 million youth have been trained in CPR by their teachers through this lifesaving program to date.

Canada: A World Model for High School CPR and Defibrillator Training

OTTAWA, ONTARIO

(Marketwire – Feb. 1, 2012)

February is Heart Month and tens of thousands of youth across the country are being empowered with the skills and knowledge to save lives with CPR.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation, a charitable foundation, is setting up CPR and defibrillator training in high schools across Canada. Over 1.8 million students have been trained by their teachers, making Canada a world leader in high school CPR.

Program Snapshot:

-1,600 high schools -300,000 students trained each year -4,500 teachers trained as CPR instructors to date -45,000 durable mannequins donated to date -1.8 million students trained to date

As a result of the training, students from across the country are stepping up in the face of emergencies. Many are saving lives. These are just a few of their stories:

-19 year old Samantha saved her friend’s life after he suddenly collapsed from cardiac arrest.
-Tanner was working at a school coop placement when his boss went into cardiac arrest. Tanner was quick to react and save his life.
-Jenysse was at work when a stranger out for a motorcycle ride decided to stop at the gas station. He collapsed and she saved his life.

To learn more about the ACT Foundation and to read about the many student rescues from across Canada, visit www.actfoundation.ca. Please contact ACT for interviews with rescuers or survivors.

About the ACT Foundation

The ACT Foundation is the national charitable organization dedicated to establishing CPR as a mandatory program in every Canadian high school. The ACT Foundation raises funds to donate mannequins, defibrillator training units, defibrillators for schools, train teachers as instructors for their students, donate manuals and resources to schools, and guide schools in program set-up. ACT’s health partners who are committed to bringing the program to all high schools are AstraZeneca Canada, Pfizer Canada and Sanofi.

Student reacts, stresses importance of AEDs

At a basketball game held in a high school, ACT High School CPR student Laila jumped into action when a young woman collapsed on the court. Laila used her CPR knowledge to assist on the scene, but unfortunately the player did not survive. Laila shares her story, and stresses how important it is that high schools have Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs).

Ottawa teachers save student’s life with CPR

Arriving at the school on Jan. 16, 2004, Sue saw three police cars, an ambulance, an EMT vehicle and a fire truck.

“I threw my keys and ran. I knew I it was really bad. When I got to the second floor, I could see the paramedics shocking him,” she says. “I lost it.”

Rob suffered a cardiac arrest during an exam for his Civics class at Woodroffe High School. Vice-principals Patrick and Rowan responded quickly to the emergency. Both had learned CPR through the ACT High School CPR Program when they were physical education teachers. Together, they performed CPR until paramedics arrived.

“I feel a sense of relief that it went so well and turned out the way it did. You do what you’re trained to do. I can’t imagine not knowing what to do in that kind of situation. It’s a great feeling,” says Rowan.

Rob recovered quickly from the incident. The 21-year-old now has an internal defibrillator.

“I feel great. I’m lucky they did CPR,” says Rob, who was told by doctors that, because of the risks involved, he can no longer play competitive sports or become a police officer. “But I’m alive. There are lots of other things I can do in life. I feel normal again.”

Sue is thankful teachers at her son’s school were trained in CPR. Without their quick action, her son would not be alive today.

“It only takes four hours to learn CPR. The air you breathe into the person you are trying to save, your body doesn’t need. But it is priceless. You may be scared that it might not work, and that’s OK. It might not, but it might – and it did for my son. A life is more precious than the four hours it takes to learn CPR.”

The ACT High School CPR Program was made possible at Woodroffe High School thanks to generous community and provincial-level support which enabled the donation of mannequins, teacher training and curriculum resources. The lead community partner in Ottawa is the Kiwanis Club of Ottawa. The print partner which donates the printing of the student manual is the Ottawa Citizen. Provincial partners of the program are the Government of Ontario, Hydro One, Shoppers Drug Mart, and The Ontario Trillium Foundation.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is an award-winning, national charitable organization dedicated to establishing CPR in high schools across Canada. ACT raises funds to donate mannequins, teacher training, manuals and other materials to schools, and guides schools in program set-up and long-term sustainability. Teachers teach CPR to their students as a regular part of the curriculum. Over 900,000 youth have been trained in CPR through this lifesaving program to date.

Core partners supporting the program in Ontario and throughout Canada are companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb Canada, Pfizer Canada and sanofi-aventis. They provide ACT’s sustaining funding and are committed to the Foundation’s national goal of promoting health and empowering Canadians to save lives.

U.S. city proclaims a day in honour of Ottawa teen

The Ottawa teen was taking his morning shower. He was getting ready for a day of fun with his friends in Dublin, Ohio where he was vacationing with his younger brother Jakob. That’s when Jakob suddenly burst into the bathroom.

“Charlene’s dead,” he said. Charlene, 45, was the mother of Adam’s 15-year-old friend Jonathan, and the host of this late summer vacation.

“I was shocked,” says Adam. “I jumped out of the shower, put on my pajamas and ran downstairs. I walked into the living room and I just stared at her for a couple of seconds.”

Just months before that day in August, Adam had been taught CPR at Ottawa’s Sacred Heart High School through the ACT High School CPR Program. He remembered what he had learned and began going through the steps while Jonathan called 9-1-1.

The teen administered CPR until police and firefighters arrived. “I was hoping that I’d wake up from this dream,” says Adam, who never gave up trying to revive his friend’s mother.

While Charlene didn’t survive, Adam’s intervention added 30 hours to her life. This precious time gave her family the opportunity to say goodbye.

“We’re so impressed with Adam,” says his mother, Connie.

His courage and quick action also had an impact on the city of Dublin. On Oct. 1, 2007 a special ceremony was held in his honour, during which Oct. 2, 2007 was proclaimed “Adam Day”.

The police officers who responded to the call were at the ceremony to congratulate him.

“From a law enforcement perspective, it’s very heartening that a young person would step up and try to save someone’s life,” says Corporal Tim of the Dublin Police. “We’re very proud of Adam.”

As for Rob, the physical education teacher who taught Adam CPR at Sacred Heart High School in the spring, he’s proud of how well his former student reacted and plans on using this story as an example in the classroom. “If you have some knowledge and preparation, the better chance you’ll have to react positively,” says Rob.

The ACT High School CPR Program was made possible in Adam’s school thanks to generous community and provincial-level support which enabled the donation of mannequins, teacher training and curriculum resources. The lead community partner in Ottawa is the Kiwanis Club of Ottawa. The print partner which donates the printing of the student manual is the Ottawa Citizen. Provincial partners of the program are the Government of Ontario, Hydro One, Shoppers Drug Mart, and The Ontario Trillium Foundation.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is an award-winning, national charitable organization dedicated to establishing CPR in high schools across Canada. ACT raises funds to donate mannequins, teacher training, manuals and other materials to schools, and guides schools in program set-up and long-term sustainability. Teachers teach CPR to their students as a regular part of the curriculum. Over 900,000 youth have been trained in CPR through this lifesaving program to date.

Core partners supporting the program in Ontario and throughout Canada are companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb Canada, Pfizer Canada and sanofi-aventis. They provide ACT’s sustaining funding and are committed to the Foundation’s national goal of promoting health and empowering Canadians to save lives.

Ottawa student saves brother’s life

She is usually in the library every night until 9:00 p.m. Instead, she chose to head home and join her family for dinner. According to Suzy, this is the best decision she ever made.

When Suzy’s 11 year old brother Nour began choking on a piece of meat, she reacted quickly, using the skills she learned through the ACT program at Nepean High School in Ottawa. She rushed to his aid, performing the Heimlich Manoeuvre.

“I acted on my instincts. His eyes were red. He couldn’t breathe. My mom froze. She was in utter shock,” Suzy says. “It happened so fast. I began the Heimlich Manoeuvre and wouldn’t stop until it worked.”

Suzy is so grateful for having learned CPR in high school. “I am very close to my brothers. Looking back, if I hadn’t been there and known what to do, I don’t think I could live with myself.”

The ACT High School CPR Program was made possible at Nepean High School thanks to generous community and provincial-level support which enabled the donation of mannequins, teacher training and curriculum resources. The lead community partner in Ottawa is the Kiwanis Club of Ottawa. The print partner which donates the printing of the student manual is the Ottawa Citizen. Provincial partners of the program are the Government of Ontario, Hydro One, Shoppers Drug Mart, and The Ontario Trillium Foundation.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is an award-winning, national charitable organization dedicated to establishing CPR in high schools across Canada. ACT raises funds to donate mannequins, teacher training, manuals and other materials to schools, and guides schools in program set-up and long-term sustainability. Teachers teach CPR to their students as a regular part of the curriculum. Over 900,000 youth have been trained in CPR through this lifesaving program to date.

Core partners supporting the program in Ontario and throughout Canada are companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb Canada, Pfizer Canada and sanofi-aventis. They provide ACT’s sustaining funding and are committed to the Foundation’s national goal of promoting health and empowering Canadians to save lives.