Basketball coach saves student with CPR and an AED

A Grade 10 student is alive today thanks to the quick provision of CPR and the use of an AED by his basketball coach Mike Rowley, of St. Mother Teresa High School. Since 1994, the ACT Foundation has established free High School CPR and AED training Program in over 1,800 high schools across Canada.

Zachary Legault, ‘Zach’ as his friends call him, is an energetic student who loves sports. But at this school year’s basketball tryout – Zach’s heart stopped.

“I was adding names to my team shortlist when I saw a student come off the court hunched over,” says Coach Mike. “It was Zach, and he was gasping for air.” Suddenly Zach collapsed face-first on the floor sending an echoing thud across the gym. “My instincts kicked in. It was the ACT training,” says Mike, who told his Assistant Coach, Yvan, to call 911.

Coach Mike quickly assessed that Zach was unresponsive and not breathing. He began CPR and using the school’s AED, saved his student’s life.

“I can tell you as a mom, receiving the phone call was nothing short of traumatic.  But to hear over and over in the days that followed from paramedics, ER physicians, and the team of cardiologists, that had the coach not responded so quickly performing CPR and using the AED, Zach would not be with us today,” says Stephanie Muldoon, Zach’s mother.

Zach underwent open-heart surgery at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) to fix a previously unknown heart defect he has had since birth. Zach has made a full recovery.

Zach would like to see everyone empowered to save a life. “It can happen to a family member, a friend, it can happen to anyone around you. You wouldn’t expect a young athlete to have a cardiac arrest, but I’m an example of what can happen,” says Zach.

ACT RESCUE VIDEO: Zach’s Story

“The ACT Foundation coordinates the training of thousands of teachers enabling them to train hundreds of thousands of students across Canada every year in lifesaving skills,” says Sandra Clarke, the Foundation’s Executive Director.

“ACT set up the High School CPR Program at St. Mother Teresa High School in 1998, adding the AED training program for students in 2009.”

To date, 8,300 teachers across Canada are trained as CPR instructors for their students and 4.8 million students have learned how to save a life through the ACT High School CPR and Defibrillator Program. Many lives have been saved.

Partner and Community Quotes

AstraZeneca Canada, ACT National Health Partner
Kiersten Combs, President of AstraZeneca Canada
We’re proud to be a long-standing partner of the ACT Foundation – supporting its goal of establishing CPR and defibrillator training in Canadian high schools, providing youth with critical life-saving skills, and raising awareness of the importance of cardiovascular health,” says Kiersten Combs, President of AstraZeneca Canada. “Stories like Zach’s and the quick thinking of his coach Mike Rowley are a great reminder of the impact that initiatives like the ACT High School CPR Program can have by empowering teachers and students to help save lives.”

Amgen Canada, ACT National Health Partner
Dr. Suna Avcil, Executive Medical Director of Amgen Canada
“Amgen is honoured to support the ACT Foundation as a National Health Partner,” says Dr. Suna Avcil, Executive Medical Director of Amgen Canada. “Rescue stories are a testament to the quality of the program and the criticality of ensuring that the education community is equipped with the knowledge and skills to contribute. Together we will continue to advance excellence in science literacy, inspire the next generation, help educators to teach more effectively, and improve access to resources for teachers, students, and society at large.”

Hydro One, ACT Provincial Partner, Ontario
Jay Armitage, Vice President, Marketing & Communications, Hydro One
“We would like to commend Coach Mike for his quick instinct to put his first aid training into action. This real-life rescue demonstrates the importance of equipping young people and their teachers with the lifesaving skills necessary to build safe communities,” said Jay Armitage, Vice President, Marketing & Communications, Hydro One. “Thanks to his CPR and AED training received through the program, Coach Mike had the invaluable tools needed to act fast and save a life.”

Ottawa Catholic School Board, Participating School Board
Tom D’Amico, Director of Education, Ottawa Catholic School Board
“I’m proud of the actions by Coach Mike Rowley. Teachers enter the profession to make a difference in the lives of youth, and in this situation, thanks to his training and the availability of an AED in the school, he was able to save the life of a student athlete.”

About The ACT Foundation

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is the national charitable organization establishing free CPR in Canadian high schools. The program is built on ACT’s award-winning community-based model of partnerships and support, whereby ACT finds local partners who donate the mannequins and AED training units that schools need to deliver the program. High school teachers are trained to teach their students lifesaving skills as a regular part of the curriculum, reaching all youth before graduation. More than 4.8 million youth have been trained in CPR by their teachers through this lifesaving program to date.

The ACT High School CPR and AED Program is made possible with the support of its National Health Partners AstraZeneca Canada and Amgen Canada and its provincial partner Hydro One.

Website:           actfoundation.ca
Twitter:            @actfoundation #ACT2Save
Facebook:        @theactfoundation
Instagram:       @actfoundation
YouTube:          YouTube.com/theactfoundation

The ACT Foundation
Cristiane Doherty, Communications Manager
Mobile: 613-799-9277
cdoherty@actfoundation.ca

 

ACT Foundation recognizes Amgen Canada with Community Champion Award

The ACT Foundation is proud to present Amgen Canada with ACT’s Community Champion Award in celebration of Amgen’s 5-year anniversary as a National Health Partner to the Foundation. ACT is honoured to bestow this award to a National Health Partner for assisting the Foundation as it strives to reach its goal that would see every Canadian high school student graduate with the skills and knowledge to save a life.

Through the work of the ACT Foundation in establishing free CPR training programs in Canadian high schools, more than 4.8 million students have been trained by their teachers to date, and many are saving lives in their communities.

In Canada, an estimated 35,000 people suffer out-of-hospital cardiac arrests each year. With 80 per cent of cardiac arrests occurring in homes and public places, empowering youth with CPR training as part of their high school education will help increase citizen CPR response rates and save lives.

“CPR is an essential life skill for all Canadians,” says Dr. Justin Maloney, an emergency physician at the Ottawa Hospital and ACT Foundation’s National Medical Director. “We are grateful for Amgen Canada’s continued support in helping the ACT Foundation bring this lifesaving program into Canadian high schools.”

Through the ACT High School CPR Program, students learn about the 4 ‘Rs’ of CPR. This includes Risk factor education on heart disease and stroke; how to Recognize a developing medical emergency like a heart attack, a cardiac arrest, or stroke; how to React including the importance of calling 911 and what to do until the ambulance arrives; and Resuscitate – CPR and how to use an AED. The program promotes students’ interest in science and health that can lead to enhanced career opportunities and help build Canadian innovation.

“Amgen is honoured to support the ACT Foundation for eight years to date and five years as a national health partner,” says Brian Heath, President of Amgen Canada. “The successful delivery of programs like this require collaboration. It is everyone’s responsibility to develop Canadian youth to be national and global citizens, equipped with the knowledge and skills to contribute meaningfully through their actions and behaviours. Together we take collective action to bridge the gap for Canadian students and help them make the connection between their interests and the value they can bring beyond the classroom.”

“We are proud to present the ACT Community Champion Award to Amgen Canada, whose support is so important to the ACT Foundation’s success in saving lives. We have made great strides with the support of our National Health Partners, along with our government, health, education, and community partners,” says Sandra Clarke, Executive Director and Founder of the ACT Foundation. “It is a wonderful example of a successful partnership between government, corporate citizens, a charitable foundation, and the community affecting positive change where we live, work, and play. By working together, we are making our communities healthier.”

About The ACT Foundation
The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is the national charitable organization establishing free CPR in Canadian high schools. The program is built on ACT’s award-winning community-based model of partnerships and support, whereby ACT finds local partners who donate the mannequins and AED training units that schools need to deliver the program. High school teachers are trained to then teach lifesaving skills to their students as a regular part of the curriculum, reaching all youth prior to graduation.

The ACT High School CPR and AED Program is made possible with the support of its National Health Partners Amgen Canada and AstraZeneca Canada.

Website: actfoundation.ca
Twitter: @actfoundation #ACT2Save
Facebook: @theactfoundation
Instagram: @actfoundation
YouTube: YouTube.com/theactfoundation

Contacts:

The ACT Foundation
Cristiane Doherty
Communications Manager
Mobile: 613-799-9277
cdoherty@actfoundation.ca

Amgen Canada
Natasha Bond
Corporate Affairs
Office: 905-285-3007
Mobile: 416-801-4459
natasha.bond@amgen.com

Government of Canada announces $20 million to help communities respond to increasing opioid-related overdoses

From: Health Canada
Projects will provide training and awareness on opioid overdose response to 2.4 million Canadians and enable the distribution of 58,000 naloxone kits

March 29, 2021 | Ottawa, Ontario | Health Canada
Health Canada news release

In many areas across Canada, the COVID-19 pandemic has tragically worsened the ongoing health crisis of opioid-related harms and deaths. People who use drugs continue to face barriers and risks related to the toxicity of the illegal drug supply and reduced access to health and social services, including life-saving harm reduction and treatment.

Today, the Honourable Patty Hajdu, Minister of Health, announced $20 million in funding for the distribution of naloxone kits and opioid overdose response training to support communities that have been particularly affected by the opioid overdose crisis and are experiencing challenges in improving health outcomes of their residents. These include individuals living in rural and remote areas, Indigenous peoples, Northern residents, people experiencing homelessness, youth in communities at increased risk of opioid-related harms, and working-aged men.

The funded projects will be led by the Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation of Canada, the Canadian Red Cross and St. John Ambulance. These organizations play a key role in building awareness of opioids and substance use, including the signs of an overdose and the steps to take to help save a life. Additionally, the projects will provide education and training on how to administer naloxone and will increase access and distribution of naloxone kits in communities that need them the most. These new initiatives will supplement existing provincial and territorial take-home naloxone efforts.

The Government of Canada continues to collaborate with all levels of government, partners, stakeholders, people with lived and living experience of substance use, and organizations in communities across the country in its public health responses to the COVID-19 pandemic and overdose crisis.

Quotes

“The opioid overdose crisis has worsened during the COVID-19 pandemic. Tragically, we are losing too many of our loved ones to overdose. We must redouble our efforts to keep our friends and families safe. Harm reduction and prevention measures, like increased access to naloxone and opioid overdose response training, save lives. I thank these organizations for their important work, which is saving lives across the country.”

The Honourable Patty Hajdu
Minister of Health

“To date, the ACT Foundation has trained 4.8 million high schools students in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We are a pioneer in establishing free lifesaving training in high schools across Canada. Adding the opioid overdose response training to the CPR program will enable us to see hundreds of thousands of students being empowered by their teachers every year with lifesaving skills and taking these skills to their communities.”

Sandra Clarke
Executive Director, ACT Foundation of Canada

“In our every-day work to help vulnerable people, we have seen first-hand how the opioid crisis is devastating Canadian families and communities. We are pleased and eager to bring the strength of the Red Cross to an effort we see as vital to addressing a very complex health and social issue.”

Conrad Sauvé
President and CEO, Canadian Red Cross

“The opioid overdose crisis continues to be a significant public health issue in Canada. In response, through funding provided by SUAP, St. John Ambulance is carrying out two programs that will build a support network across the country for those being impacted by the crisis, reduce the stigma associated with opioids, and save the lives of Canadians. With assistance from Health Canada, St. John Ambulance will distribute over 40,000 naloxone kits to the tens of thousands of Canadians we will train on how to recognize an opioid poisoning, react decisively to reverse that poisoning, and save the life of that person.”

Shawn McLaren
Chief Learning Officer, St. John Ambulance

Quick facts

  • Naloxone is a life-saving medication proven to temporarily reverse an opioid-related overdose. Naloxone is safe for all ages and only works if opioids are present in someone’s system.
  • With an average of 12 deaths and 14 hospitalizations every day between January 2016 and September 2020, the opioid overdose crisis remains one of the most serious public health crises in Canada’s recent history.
  • The latest national data indicate that 19,355 people in Canada lost their lives due to opioid-related overdoses between January 2016 and September 2020. Tragically, the 1,705 deaths that occurred between July and September 2020 represent the highest national quarterly count of deaths reported by the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) since 2016.
  • As part of the Fall Economic Statement 2020, the Government of Canada committed to help Canadians struggling with problematic substance use by providing an additional $66 million over two years. This new funding will support community-based organizations responding to substance use issues, including to help them provide frontline services during COVID-19.
  • Funding for these projects is provided through Health Canada’s Substance Use and Addictions Program (SUAP).

Related products

Associated links

Contacts

Cole Davidson
Office of the Honourable Patty Hajdu
Minister of Health
613-957-0200

Media Relations
Health Canada
613-957-2983
hc.media.sc@canada.ca

Public Inquiries:
613-957-2991
1-866-225-0709

68,000 Quebec high school students will be empowered to save lives as they learn how to use an AED in addition to CPR training

Montreal (QUEBEC), November 22, 2019– The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation announced the completion of its fundraising campaign to ensure an automated external defibrillator (AED) for all public high schools in Quebec. In addition, ACT confirmed that every year 68,000 students throughout the province will learn how to use an AED combined with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training to save lives. The event was attended by Danielle McCann, Quebec Health and Social Services Minister, Isabelle Charest, Deputy Minister for Education, and representatives from the public and private sectors.

The ACT Foundation is working in partnership with the Ministry of Health and Social Services and the Ministry of Education and Higher Education to establish high school student CPR and AED training programs throughout the province since 2006. The program sees high schools receive training equipment to enable teachers to train students. This includes AED training units, CPR and AED training mannequins, and program set-up that will see all secondary 3 students empowered with the skills and knowledge to save lives. “When a cardiac arrest occurs, taking action quickly is critical to their chances of survival. Having access to an automated external defibrillator, and knowing what to do while waiting for help, are key elements that will enable students to be ready to save lives. From this perspective, the initiative of the ACT Foundation and its partners is remarkable,” says Danielle McCann, Minister of Health and Social Services.

Research indicates that early CPR, combined with early defibrillation, can increase the chance of survival by up to 75 per cent, according to the Heart and Stroke Foundation. As the importance of public access defibrillators grows, there is increasing focus on the need for an AED in high schools. With high schools receiving an AED, the device will be available for on-site cardiac arrest emergencies involving students and adults. It will also be available for the general public, given the role of high schools as busy community centers with many people passing through their halls each week for adult education, sports and community events.

“This is a remarkable partnership, as secondary 3 students and staff at every public high school in Quebec will be trained and better prepared to respond to emergencies. From a perspective of health and well-being of the population, it will be very useful for these thousands of students in Quebec to learn effective techniques of cardiopulmonary resuscitation early on in their lives,” mentions Isabelle Charest, Deputy Minister of Education.

“CPR training at school is a health initiative that saves lives,” added Dr. Paul Poirier, Cardiologist, IUCPQ (Institut universitaire de cardiologie et de pneumologie de Québec).

With the support of the Quebec Government, ACT’s health partners AstraZeneca Canada, Amgen Canada and Sanofi Canada, cardiologists, the Fédération des médecins spécialistes du Québec (FMSQ), the Fédération des médecins omnipraticiens du Québec (FMOQ) and community partners, the ACT Foundation has completed its fundraising campaign for AEDs for public high schools and continues program roll out.

“As a national health partner with the ACT Foundation, Amgen Canada is proud to help students learn life-saving skills for life-threatening emergencies, but more importantly, to become champions for health and science in their families and communities,” says Brian Heath, member of ACT’s Board of Directors, and Vice-President and General Manager at Amgen Canada. “We strongly believe in the power of young people to inspire wellness.”
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To date, the ACT Foundation has set up the ACT High School CPR Program in more than 1,800 high schools nation-wide, empowering more than 4.6 million youth to save lives.

“We are thrilled with the support from our partners,” said Sandra Clarke, the ACT Foundation’s Executive Director. “With it, we can enhance the CPR program in Quebec high schools with the addition of the AED training component and AED devices for schools. These are lifesaving skills that students will be able to bring to their current and future families and communities.”

The Evolution of the Program in Quebec

ACT launched Phase I in 1997 to set up the CPR training program in 400 public high schools in Quebec. Since then, more than 710,000 students have been trained and 68,000 more are trained in CPR every year. Based on this success, the Government of Quebec made CPR training mandatory in all high schools in November 2017.

During Phase 2 launched in 2011, ACT has focused on enhancing the CPR training program with AED training for students, and on providing AED devices for all public high schools. ACT expects that 68,000 secondary 3 students will be fully trained in both AED and CPR every year.

About the ACT Foundation

The ACT Foundation is the national charitable organization establishing the free CPR and AED program in Canadian high schools. The program is built on ACT’s award-winning community-based model of partnerships and support, whereby ACT finds local partners who donate the mannequins and AED training units that schools need to set up the program. High school teachers then teach CPR and how to use a defibrillator to their students as a regular part of the curriculum, reaching all youth prior to graduation. ACT’s partners, committed to bringing the program to Québec are the Government of Quebec, and our national health partners AstraZeneca Canada, Sanofi Canada, and Amgen Canada.

Website: actfoundation.ca
Twitter: @actfoundation #ACT2Save
Youtube: Youtube.com/theactfoundation
Facebook: @theactfoundation
Instagram: @actfoundation

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For media interviews and information please contact:
Maxime Debeauvais
NATIONAL Public Relations
MDebeauvais@national.ca
Tel: +1-514-843-2393

Jennifer Edwards
Director of Operations
ACT Foundation
jedwards@actfoundation.ca
Tel: +1-613-286-5260
Toll: 800-465-9111

Hydro One extends partnership with the ACT Foundation to help save lives

With 80 per cent of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occurring at home or in public places, early CPR combined with early defibrillation can increase the chance of survival by up to 75 per cent.

Barrie, ON – May 2, 2019 – Today, the Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation and long-time provincial partner, Hydro One, announced a three-year partnership that will support the training of 450,000 additional high school students in how to save a life. This partnership will bring critical life-saving skills to more rural and First Nation schools. Since 2000, Hydro One has provided important support to help the ACT Foundation train more than 2 million high school students in CPR.

“At Hydro One, safety is at the core of everything we do. Our priority is that every worker returns home to their family safely at the end of each day,” said Jason Fitzsimmons, Chief Corporate Affairs and Customer Care Officer, Hydro One. “We ensure our employees are properly trained to respond to medical emergencies that could occur in the workplace, at home or in public. By partnering with ACT, we are also able to support the teaching of high school students across the province in these critical lifesaving skills.”

The ACT Foundation is the national charitable organization dedicated to establishing CPR and defibrillation training in every Canadian high school. The program sees all students trained in: recognizing a developing medical emergency; safety issues and emergency scene management; and CPR and how to use an automated external defibrillator (AED). Early CPR, combined with early defibrillation can increase the chances of survival for cardiac arrest victims by up to 75 per cent, according to the Heart and Stroke Foundation.

The ACT High School CPR and Defibrillator Training Program is built on ACT’s award-winning communitybased model of partnerships and support. ACT raises funds for CPR mannequins and AED training units for all high schools, trains teachers as CPR instructors for their students, and guides schools in program set up.

“We are thrilled with the commitment of ACT’s Ontario provincial partner, Hydro One”, says ACT Foundation Executive Director Sandra Clarke. “Their support is helping the ACT Foundation enable thousands of students across the province to be emergency ready to respond to serious medical emergencies that can happen to their family members, friends, neighbors and others in their communities.”

The Foundation has already established the CPR program in more than 1,790 high schools and more than 4.2 million youth across Canada have been trained to date. Hydro One and ACT made the announcement as students took part in CPR and defibrillator training at Bear Creek Secondary School, in Barrie, Ontario. More than 6,500 Simcoe County students are anticipated to be trained this year.

About the ACT Foundation

The ACT Foundation is the national charitable organization establishing the free CPR and AED program in Canadian high schools. The program is built on ACT’s award-winning community-based model of partnerships and support, whereby ACT finds local partners who donate the mannequins and AED training units that schools need to set up the program. High school teachers then teach CPR and how to use a defibrillator to their students as a regular part of the curriculum, reaching all youth prior to graduation. ACT’s partners, committed to bringing the program to Ontario are the Government of Ontario and Hydro one and our national health partners AstraZeneca Canada, Sanofi Canada, and Amgen Canada. www.actfoundation.ca or on Twitter @actfoundation #ACT2Save

About Hydro One Inc.

Hydro One Inc. is a fully owned subsidiary of Hydro One Limited, Ontario’s largest electricity transmission and distribution provider with almost 1.4 million valued customers, over C$25.7 billion in assets and 2018 annual revenues of over C$6.2 billion. Our team of approximately 8,600 skilled and dedicated employees proudly build and maintain a safe and reliable electricity system which is essential to supporting strong and successful communities. In 2018, Hydro One invested almost $1.6 billion in its 30,000 circuit km of highvoltage transmission and 123,000 circuit km of primary distribution networks and injected approximately $1.3 billion into the economy by buying goods and services in Ontario. We are committed to the communities where we live and work through community investment, sustainability and diversity initiatives. We are one of only six utility companies in Canada to achieve the Sustainable Electricity Company designation from the Canadian Electricity Association. Through Hydro One Telecom Inc.’s extensive fibre optic network, we also provide advanced broadband telecommunications services on a wholesale basis. Hydro One Limited’s common shares are listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange (TSX: H).

For further information: Hydro One Media Relations 24 hours a day at 1-877-506-7584 (toll-free in Ontario only) or 416-345-6868. Our website is www.HydroOne.com. Follow us on facebook.com/hydrooneofficial, twitter.com/hydroone and instagram.com/hydrooneofficial.

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For photo opportunities or media interviews and information:

Jennifer Edwards
Operations Manager
ACT Foundation
jedwards@actfoundation.ca
Tel: (613) 286-5260
Toll: (800) 465-9111

Richard Francella
Media Relations and Communications
Hydro One Inc.
Richard.francella@hydroone.com
Tel: (416) 345-6868

www.actfoundation.ca
www.twitter.com/actfoundation #ACT2save www.facebook/theactfoundation
www.youtube.com/theactfoundation
www.instagram.com/actfoundation