ACT Foundation enhancing high school CPR training with opioid awareness and overdose response training

(Ottawa, ON, March 29, 2021) The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation announced today it is enhancing the ACT High School CPR and AED Program with an Opioids Overdose Response Training Module.

Support through a contribution from Health Canada’s Substance Use and Addictions Program (SUAP) will enable the ACT Foundation to expand its Ottawa pilot of the opioids awareness and response training to hundreds of high schools across Canada, empowering thousands of students every year.

The ACT High School CPR and AED Program is well established in high schools across the country. Enhancing the program with opioids awareness and response training is a natural next step in equipping youth to respond to life threatening emergencies they may encounter. Knowing the signs and symptoms of an opioid overdose and how to respond can help save lives.

The opioids module will follow ACT’s CPR program delivery model. High school teachers will be trained to teach students to recognize the signs of an opioids overdose, the importance of calling 911 quickly, and how to respond with the use of Naloxone nasal spray, and perform CPR when necessary.

“ACT has successfully delivered the High School CPR and AED Program in high schools across Canada. It is a natural progression to add opioid overdose response training,” says Dr. Justin Maloney, National Medical Director and Chair, ACT Foundation. “We want to empower students and teachers by adding to their lifesaving toolbox.”

“We are really pleased to receive support from Health Canada, enabling the ACT Foundation to expand the opioids overdose response training to thousands of young Canadians through the school program,” says Sandra Clarke, the ACT Foundation’s Executive Director. “This is what ACT does. We empower high school students to save lives.”

The ACT Foundation

The ACT Foundation is the national charitable organization establishing free CPR and AED training in Canadian high schools. The program is built on ACT’s award-winning community-based model of partnerships and support, whereby ACT finds local partners who donate the mannequins and AED training units that schools need to deliver the program. High school teachers are trained to then teach lifesaving skills to their students as a regular part of the curriculum, reaching all youth prior to graduation. The ACT High School CPR and AED Program is made possible with the support of its national partners AstraZeneca Canada and Amgen Canada. The ACT Foundation gratefully acknowledges the financial support of Health Canada for the ACT Opioid Overdose Response Training implementation.

Website: actfoundation.ca
Twitter: @actfoundation #ACT2Save
Facebook: @theactfoundation
Instagram: @actfoundation
YouTube: YouTube.com/theactfoundation

For more information about the ACT Foundation and the ACT Opioid Overdose Response Training contact:

Cristiane Doherty
Communications Manager
The ACT Foundation
cdoherty@actfoundation.ca
Cell: 613-799-9277

Alberta’s Star Press Inc. donates thousands of CPR teaching manuals to local schools

“It is very economical to help move this program forward, from my perspective,” said Roger. “We need confident young, citizens, and it is very easy for me to slide this through my plant and pick up the cost of the newsprint to help make that happen.”

The following communities are benefiting from Star Press Inc’s generous contribution:

1. Cold Lake
2. Consort
3. Coronation
4. Drumheller
5. Fox Creek
6. Grande Cache
7. Jasper
8. Lamont
9. Morinville
10. Provost
11. Redwater
12. Rocky Mountain House
13. Sedgewick
14. Smoky Lake
15. Swan Hills
16. Three Hills
17. Tofield
18. Two Hills
19. Valleyview
20. Vegreville
21. Vermilion
22. Viking
23. Wainwright
24. Whitecourt

The ACT High School CPR Program was made possible in Alberta thanks to generous community and provincial-level support which enabled the donation of mannequins, teacher training and curriculum resources. Provincial partners of the program are Alberta Education and the STARS Foundation (a founding provincial partner) as well as Alberta print partner Star Press Inc.

The ACT Foundation’s health partners, who support the program in Alberta communities and throughout Canada are: AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb Canada, Pfizer Canada and sanofi-aventis. They provide ACT’s sustaining funding and are committed to the Foundation’s national goal of promoting health and empowering Canadians to save lives.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is an award-winning, national charitable organization dedicated to establishing CPR in high schools across Canada. ACT raises funds to donate mannequins, teacher training, manuals and other materials to schools, and guides schools in program set-up and long-term sustainability. Teachers teach CPR to their students as a regular part of the curriculum. More than 1.4 million youth have been trained in CPR through this lifesaving program to date.

Alberta student who taught peers the ACT High School CPR Program now plans to become paramedic

Dominique believes all students should know how to react…

Lethbridge student Dominique Pietras, 18, has been peer teaching the ACT High School CPR program ever since she learned it in Grade 10.

After dedicating much of her high school life to first aid training, she graduated from Catholic Central High School with plans to become a paramedic.

Dominique’s school is special in that it allows for a specialization in sports medicine.

“I put passion in to what I do, and I take pride in my basic and athletic first aid skills,” said Dominique.

“I thought the ACT High School CPR Program was really great,” she said. “I loved getting to do the hands on training with the mannequins.”

“It gave me a big sense of responsibility and I take pride in keeping my skills up to date,” said Dominique. “I wouldn’t even have thought of getting certified if I hadn’t taken the course, and then I wouldn’t have discovered what it is that I want to do.”

After taking the program in combination with her school’s other first aid courses, Dominique was able to put her skills to use several times throughout her high school career. She has taped ankles on sports fields, checked pulses of people who were having trouble breathing, and once at the community pool where she works she assisted someone who was choking on a small candy.

“I just wanted to get her to start breathing and I was actually able to clear her throat with my finger, and then I started to do breaths,” said Dominique. “My first thought was my first aid and CPR training. Nothing else went through my mind. I just followed my instincts.”

But Dominique didn’t stop at her own training – she then went on to assist her teachers in delivering the lifesaving program to her peers. In her graduating year, the ACT Foundation, in partnership with the STARS Foundation, honoured Dominique with a Student Leadership Award for work.

“I peer teach CPR in the sports medicine classes, and I show the students the proper technique,” explained Dominique, who also trains other students in athletic first aid, such as learning emergency signals on the field and how to tape ankles and wrists.

“Dominique is very dedicated, she is very conscientious and very peer friendly,” said her phys-ed teacher Diane Delbello. “She is wonderful. She is very confident, but very levelheaded. She is committed to first aid and her students respect her for that.”

“I’ve had so many compliments from the coaches,” Diane continued. “They count on her and she has become just as much a part of the coaching staff as she is a student.”

“We are so impressed with Dominique and the initiative she has taken to help teachers empower her fellow students to save lives,” said Sandra Clarke, Executive Director of the ACT Foundation. “We are thrilled to present her with ACT’s Student Leadership Award. She is a wonderful example of community leadership and a model for her peers.”

“STARS congratulates Dominique on her achievement, her community leadership and her involvement in making a difference,” said Dr. Greg Powell, President and CEO of the STARS Foundation.

“The skills acquired through the ACT High School CPR Program go beyond the response ‘in the moment,’” Dr. Powell continued. “The training also provides transferrable life skills in rapid decision making and taking appropriate action when required to do so. We are proud to be partnered with the ACT Foundation in supporting such important life, leadership and technical skills.”

Dominique is humble when asked about both her peer teaching and the emergency assistance she has been able to provide for others.

“I just really love it,” she said. “I find it interesting, it is fun, and I think it is a good experience to teach other people to do what I love.”

“Why not be a leader and take that extra step?” she said. “I take pride in what I do.”

The ACT High School CPR Program was made possible in Catholic Central High School, thanks to the generous support of ACT’s Alberta partners: the STARS Foundation, a founding partner for the program, and Alberta Education. ACT’s lead community partner in Lethbridge is the Kiwanis Club of Green Acres. Mannequins and curriculum resources were donated to the school and teachers are trained as CPR instructors for their students.

Also responsible are ACT’s core partners, companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb Canada, Pfizer Canada and sanofi-aventis. They provide ACT’s sustaining funding and are committed to the Foundation’s Alberta program and national goal of promoting health and empowering Canadians to save lives.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is an award-winning, national charitable organization dedicated to establishing CPR in high schools across Canada. ACT raises funds to donate mannequins, teacher training, manuals and other materials to schools and guides schools in program set-up and long-term sustainability. Teachers teach CPR to their students as a regular part of the curriculum. More than 900,000 youth have been trained in CPR through this lifesaving program to date.

Alberta student leader takes the stage to teach CPR to his peers

Ben Roth believes all students should know how to react…

The ACT High School CPR Program is known for engaging and exciting young people about emergency preparedness – but Calgary student Ben Roth went above and beyond when he stepped up and volunteered to actually help teach the program to his peers.

As Ben has been swimming since he was a child and is now a trained lifeguard, he enjoyed the ACT program immediately and wanted to be a part of it.

“I thought the school did a great job covering the basics of what you need to do in an emergency situation, but I wanted to help,” said Ben, who also teaches swimming lessons.

“I put together the mannequins, demonstrated how to work them for the class, and helped with some of the lectures,” said Ben. “Then the next year, I came in and taught a lot of the CPR program to the Grade 10 students.”

“Learning CPR and being a lifeguard was my goal as a 10-year-old,” said Ben. “I’ve wanted to do this for a very long time. Being a lifeguard and taking the ACT High School CPR Program have been my first steps to becoming a lifesaver as a doctor.”

“It is outstanding to see this kind of knowledge and leadership in students who take our program,” said Sandra Clarke, Executive Director of the ACT Foundation. “The program often boosts students’ interest in health care as a career choice, and we are so happy with the initiative that Ben has taken.”

“He was phenomenal,” said Arlene Buchan, the phys-ed teacher who runs ACT’s lifesaving program in Calgary’s Dr. E.P. Scarlett High School.

“He has a great sense of humour, so all the attention was on him and the kids were really listening,” said Arlene. “He used scenarios that the kids would relate to, and I think he actually did a better job of the lecture than we do.”

“In the quiz after the class was completed, it was really noticeable how much the students had retained,” said Arlene.

“I was in the lecture with him and if I interjected we would co-teach…but I really didn’t need to step in often,” she said with a laugh. “He even brought his own supplies.”

“I always feel like other people listen to me when I have something to say, and right now I have something to say that is important,” said Ben.

“I think learning CPR is a really good idea,” said Ben. “Emergencies like this are hopefully something that most students won’t experience – but they should all know how to react if they do.”

Ben said his parents were happy to hear about his leadership in helping teach the ACT High School CPR Program to his peers.

“It is kind of a normal thing in my life to take on opportunities like this,” he said with a laugh. “So my parents weren’t extremely surprised…but they were definitely pretty proud.”

“He has always been really comfortable in front of a group,” said Ben’s father Clayton. “He doesn’t have a shy bone in his body.”

“We’re very proud of him,” said Clayton. “He is a great kid.”

The ACT High School CPR Program was made possible in Ben’s school thanks to generous community and provincial-level support which enabled the donation of mannequins, teacher training and curriculum resources. Community partners in Calgary are the Kiwanis Clubs of Calgary (Chinook, Downtown, Foothills, Metro and Northmount), while provincial partners of the program are Alberta Education and the STARS Foundation (a founding provincial partner in this province).

Core partners supporting the program in Alberta and throughout Canada are companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb Canada, Pfizer Canada and sanofi-aventis. They provide ACT’s sustaining funding and are committed to the Foundation’s national goal of promoting health and empowering Canadians to save lives.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is an award-winning, national charitable organization dedicated to establishing CPR in high schools across Canada. ACT raises funds to donate mannequins, teacher training, manuals and other materials to schools, and guides schools in program set-up and long-term sustainability. Teachers teach CPR to their students as a regular part of the curriculum. More than 900,000 youth have been trained in CPR through this lifesaving program to date.

Longtime supporter of the Calgary ACT High School CPR Program honoured with Community Champion Award

Kiwanis Club member Murray Smith believes all students should know how to react…

Calgary resident and Kiwanis Club member Murray Smith has long been a supporter of CPR training for youth.

The ACT Foundation recently honoured Smith, Chair of the Kiwanis Committee for the ACT High School CPR Program, with a Community Champion Award for his continuous support.

“Murray has played a critical role in both initiating and sustaining the ACT High School CPR Program in Calgary,” said Sandra Clarke, Executive Director of the ACT Foundation. “With his leadership, five Calgary Kiwanis Clubs have provided continuous support for the program, and Murray has always been enthusiastic and willing to help.”

“Murray has believed in this program from the beginning,” said Clarke. “We are delighted to honour him with an ACT Community Champion Award.”

In 2001, under Smith’s leadership, five Kiwanis Clubs of Calgary (Chinook, Downtown, Foothills, Northmount and Metro) helped establish the ACT High School CPR Program in the Calgary Board of Education and the Calgary Roman Catholic School Board. This was done in partnership with the ACT Foundation, Alberta Education, Calgary EMS and the STARS Foundation.

Years later, after thousands of students have been trained, Smith continues to be committed to the program.

In 2007, the Kiwanis Clubs donated an additional $20,000 to replenish training mannequins for 33 Calgary high schools. Thanks to the ongoing support of the Kiwanis Clubs of Calgary, more than 65, 000 Calgary youth have been trained to save a life through the ACT High School CPR Program.

Murray says the reason he supports the program is simple:

“Kiwanis Clubs of Calgary serve the needs of the community where its members live and work. This program empowers young people to assume responsibility and save lives. Everyone in the community benefits,” he said. “One never knows – the life saved may be yours.”

The ACT High School CPR Program was made possible in Calgary thanks to generous community and provincial-level support which enabled the donation of mannequins, teacher training and curriculum resources. Community partners in Calgary are the Kiwanis Clubs of Calgary (Chinook, Downtown, Foothills, Metro and Northmount), while provincial partners of the program are Alberta Education and the STARS Foundation (a founding provincial partner in this province).

Core partners supporting the program in Alberta and throughout Canada are companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb Canada, Pfizer Canada and sanofi-aventis. They provide ACT’s sustaining funding and are committed to the Foundation’s national goal of promoting health and empowering Canadians to save lives.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is an award-winning, national charitable organization dedicated to establishing CPR in high schools across Canada. ACT raises funds to donate mannequins, teacher training, manuals and other materials to schools, and guides schools in program set-up and long-term sustainability. Teachers teach CPR to their students as a regular part of the curriculum. More than 900,000 youth have been trained in CPR through this lifesaving program to date.

Alberta Update

Following the launch of the ACT Foundation’s High School CPR Program in Edmonton in 2001, the Alberta government made CPR a mandatory part of the provincial curriculum.

In 2006, the ACT Foundation completed set-up of the High School CPR Program throughout the province:

  • Almost 300,000 Alberta youth have been trained in CPR to date.
  • 315 high schools have established the program.
  • 45,000 students are trained by their teachers each year.
  • More than 1,000 teachers have been trained as CPR instructors for their students.

Grande Prairie student saves girlfriend from choking

On a cold March day in Grande Prairie, Alberta, 16-year-old Taven was enjoying time at home with his girlfriend Ashley, when she started to choke. “I had just put a piece of gum in my mouth when it got stuck in my throat. I panicked and grabbed my throat,” remembers Ashley.

Taven realized Ashley could no longer breathe, “She was bent over on the island in the kitchen, her face was down, and she was trying to cough, but then the coughing stopped,” recounts Taven. Trying to remain calm, he rushed to her aid, “I started doing abdominal thrusts, and she kind of fell backwards on me. ” After three abdominal thrusts a piece of gum flew out of Ashley’s mouth.

Both Taven and Ashley learnt their lifesaving skills four days before through the ACT High School CPR Program as part of their physical education class at Grande Prairie Composite High School.

“I learnt the universal sign for choking during our class,” says Ashley, who used it to signal to Taven that she was in urgent need of help.

“I just learnt all this CPR a few days ago. If I hadn’t learned it before it happened, something else would have happened, guaranteed,” says Taven emphasizing the importance of the program.

The ACT Foundation and the Government of Alberta (Ministry of Education) set up the High School CPR Program in Taven and Ashley’s high school in 2002, with support from local partners – the Community Foundation of Greater Grande Prairie – David and Susan Ainsworth Fund, and the Stars Foundation.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is an award-winning, national charitable organization dedicated to establishing CPR in high schools across Canada. ACT raises funds to donate mannequins and teacher training to schools, and guides schools in program set-up and long-term sustainability. Over 1.8 million youth across Canada have been trained in CPR by their teachers through this lifesaving program to date.

ACT’s health partners supporting the program in Grande Prairie, in Alberta and throughout Canada are AstraZeneca Canada, Bristol-Myers Squibb Canada, Pfizer Canada and sanofi-aventis. They provide ACT’s sustaining funding and are committed to the Foundation’s national goal of promoting health and empowering Canadians to save lives.

New Norway teacher saves student

On a brisk fall day, physical education teacher, Hugh, was inside with his Grade 10 class playing volleyball. The students were enjoying rallying the ball when, “a student caught his head on the net and fell, landing on the back of his head,” recalls Hugh. Fifteen year old athlete Ryan, “was blue in the face and I knew I had to resuscitate him. The students called the ambulance which was about 20 minutes away from our school,” remembers Hugh.

As the entire Grade 10 physical education class watched, Hugh started artificial respiration and continued until Ryan regained consciousness. He spent a few hours in hospital and was sent home with a concussion.

Hugh teaches the ACT High School CPR Program at New Norway School and attributes his quick response to “refreshing my skills each year when I teach the CPR to students.”

The Grade 10 class had not yet taken the Program, but since the incident, “the students are so anxious to learn it,” says their teacher. And Ryan is especially glad. “I think learning CPR is important because you don’t know when something is going to happen. I’m so thankful Hugh was there and knew what do,” says Ryan, who was back at school the next Monday and continues to play volleyball.

The ACT Foundation and the Government of Alberta set up the High School CPR Program in Hugh’s school in 2002 with support from the STARS Foundation.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is an award-winning, national charitable organization dedicated to establishing CPR in high schools across Canada. ACT raises funds to donate mannequins and teacher training to schools, and guides schools in program set-up and long-term sustainability. Over 1.8 million youth across Canada have been trained in CPR by their teachers through this lifesaving program to date.

ACT’s health partners supporting the program in New Norway, in Alberta and throughout Canada are AstraZeneca Canada, Bristol-Myers Squibb Canada, Pfizer Canada and sanofi-aventis. They provide ACT’s sustaining funding and are committed to the Foundation’s national goal of promoting health and empowering Canadians to save lives.

Grande Prairie student saves father’s life

When Rob came home one night feeling nauseous with a bit of pain in his chest, he firmly told his 15-year-old daughter Renee that he was fine. Having had health problems in the past, 44-year-old Rob decided he would shrug off his discomfort and wait until morning. Renée wasn’t convinced that would be the best … Continue reading “Grande Prairie student saves father’s life”

When Rob came home one night feeling nauseous with a bit of pain in his chest, he firmly told his 15-year-old daughter Renee that he was fine.

Having had health problems in the past, 44-year-old Rob decided he would shrug off his discomfort and wait until morning.

Renée wasn’t convinced that would be the best course of action.

“He said he was nauseous and his arm was numb,” said Renée, who recalled these as signs and symptoms of a heart attack, which she had learned just weeks before in the ACT High School CPR Program.

“He said he wasn’t having a heart attack,” said Renée. “But I remembered my teacher telling me that the biggest sign is denial.”

“I was getting numb in my hands and arm and I just kind of shrugged it off and figured I could put up with a bit of pain overnight,” said Rob. “If it got worse I would just go to the hospital the next day.”

“I started vomiting a bit, so I went straight to bed to get some rest,” said Rob. “I’m only 44 – I thought I was too young to have a heart attack.”

After consulting a family friend who was a nurse, Renée knew she should follow her hunch: she called 911.

“He looked quite flushed, really pale, and sweaty,” said Renée. “I could feel my heart in my throat, and I knew I had to do something.”

The paramedics arrived quickly and went straight in to Rob’s bedroom to wake him up.

“I had dozed off and the next thing I know there is this lady shaking me saying ‘Rob;, are you okay?’” he recalled.

Rob was immediately rushed to the hospital.

“It is hard to say what would have happened if she didn’t call 911,” said Rob. “The doctor said I could have felt better and then had a full-blown heart attack the next day. He also said I could have died in my sleep.”

Rob said his whole family is very proud of Renée.

“I think it is amazing for her to just ignore my requests and take it upon herself to call 911,” said Rob. “That is very mature, for a 15-year-old.”

Renée has had aspirations of becoming a nurse for years, so she said she was very excited to learn the ACT High School CPR Program.

“It was a really easy, important class,” said Renée, adding that she now tells other students her story to stress how important learning CPR is.

Renée’s phys-ed teacher, Nicole, said that everyone at the school is very proud of how she was able to use the knowledge she learned in the program to save her father’s life.

“She learned what we taught in class and she remembered it when she needed to,” said Nicole. “I think it is just fabulous.”

“I just really hope that kids pay attention,” said Renée. “It may not seem important at the time, but things like this happen every day.”

The ACT High School CPR Program was made possible in Grande Prairie Composite High School, thanks to the generous support of ACT’s Alberta partners: the STARS Foundation, a founding partner for the program, and Alberta Education. Mannequins and curriculum resources were donated to the school and teachers are trained as CPR instructors for their students.

Also responsible are ACT’s core partners, companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb Canada, Pfizer Canada and sanofi-aventis. They provide ACT’s sustaining funding and are committed to the Foundation’s Alberta program and national goal of promoting health and empowering Canadians to save lives.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is an award-winning, national charitable organization dedicated to establishing CPR in high schools across Canada. ACT raises funds to donate mannequins, teacher training, manuals and other materials to schools and guides schools in program set-up and long-term sustainability. Teachers teach CPR to their students as a regular part of the curriculum. More than 900,000 youth have been trained in CPR through this lifesaving program to date.

Student uses ACT skills in an emergency

David had just left the supermarket when he noticed an elderly gentleman slumped in the driver’s seat of his car.

“He was hunched over and kind of looked like he was sleeping,” said David, who had just completed his ACT High School CPR Program a few weeks before. “I wasn’t sure if he was breathing.”

David, just 16-years-old at the time, walked quickly to the car and started speaking to the man through his unrolled window.

“I said, ‘Sir, can you hear me?’ and there was no response,” said David. “So I stuck my hand through the window and I gently shook him.”

“He looked like a wax figurine and his eyes were kind of glazed,” said David. “I thought – ‘Oh my God, this man might be dead.’”

David told his friends, who had also just completed the course, to go back to the store for help. Another bystander in the parking lot called 911.

“I checked his pulse and there was nothing,” explained David, who at the instruction of the 911 operator, pulled the man out of the car.

“We laid a coat under his head, and I started to perform CPR right away,” said David. “At school my teacher told us that we just needed to be calm, so when I started doing it I just tilted his chin up, opened up his passageway, listened for breathing, did two breaths and then 30 compressions.”

David continued CPR, and when the police and paramedics arrived they took over. Unfortunately, the man did not survive.

“We couldn’t believe what had happened,” said David. “It was really sad, but everyone said there was nothing more I could have done.”

David’s teachers and parents were very proud that he was able to use the skills he had learned and have the courage to try and save someone’s life.

“We are quite impressed with him and how he responded in the situation,” said David’s father, Bryan.

“The medics told him he did everything right and he did an excellent job,” Bryan continued. “We were totally amazed and are just so proud of him.”

“It doesn’t surprise me in the least that David stepped up to the plate and tried to help,” said Hugh, vice-principal and phys-ed department head at New Norway School. “He is a very great leader in our school and has been for years. He has a positive impact on his peers and he always just naturally gravitates towards doing the right thing.”

“I’m so thankful that the kids remember the skills we teach them and have the moxie to actually implement the things they have learned,” said Hugh.

David said that because of his experience, he is a steadfast supporter of all youth receiving CPR training.

“I realized that the man had already died on the scene and that was really unfortunate,” said David. “But I now know that I have the instinct and the skill if I ever face another emergency.”

“Before I took the class I had no idea how to do it, so the ACT program prepared me to stay calm and I think I did a good job,” he said.

“It is really important to teach young kids about this because there are many situations where young people will be first at the scene,” said David. “This is important for everyone to know, so we all have the chance to save a life.”

The ACT High School CPR Program was made possible in New Norway School thanks to the generous support of the STARS Foundation and Alberta Education, who are founding partners of the Alberta program. Mannequins and curriculum resources were donated to the schools and teachers are trained as CPR instructors for their students.

Also responsible are ACT’s core partners, companies in the research-based pharmaceutical industry: AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb Canada, Pfizer Canada and sanofi-aventis. They provide ACT’s sustaining funding and are committed to the Alberta program and ACT’s national goal of promoting health and empowering Canadians to save lives.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is an award-winning, national charitable organization dedicated to establishing CPR in high schools across Canada. ACT raises funds to donate mannequins, teacher training, manuals and other materials to schools and guides schools in program set-up and long-term sustainability. Teachers teach CPR to their students as a regular part of the curriculum. More than 900,000 youth have been trained in CPR through this lifesaving program to date.