Basketball coach saves student with CPR and an AED

A Grade 10 student is alive today thanks to the quick provision of CPR and the use of an AED by his basketball coach Mike Rowley, of St. Mother Teresa High School. Since 1994, the ACT Foundation has established free High School CPR and AED training Program in over 1,800 high schools across Canada.

Zachary Legault, ‘Zach’ as his friends call him, is an energetic student who loves sports. But at this school year’s basketball tryout – Zach’s heart stopped.

“I was adding names to my team shortlist when I saw a student come off the court hunched over,” says Coach Mike. “It was Zach, and he was gasping for air.” Suddenly Zach collapsed face-first on the floor sending an echoing thud across the gym. “My instincts kicked in. It was the ACT training,” says Mike, who told his Assistant Coach, Yvan, to call 911.

Coach Mike quickly assessed that Zach was unresponsive and not breathing. He began CPR and using the school’s AED, saved his student’s life.

“I can tell you as a mom, receiving the phone call was nothing short of traumatic.  But to hear over and over in the days that followed from paramedics, ER physicians, and the team of cardiologists, that had the coach not responded so quickly performing CPR and using the AED, Zach would not be with us today,” says Stephanie Muldoon, Zach’s mother.

Zach underwent open-heart surgery at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) to fix a previously unknown heart defect he has had since birth. Zach has made a full recovery.

Zach would like to see everyone empowered to save a life. “It can happen to a family member, a friend, it can happen to anyone around you. You wouldn’t expect a young athlete to have a cardiac arrest, but I’m an example of what can happen,” says Zach.

ACT RESCUE VIDEO: Zach’s Story

“The ACT Foundation coordinates the training of thousands of teachers enabling them to train hundreds of thousands of students across Canada every year in lifesaving skills,” says Sandra Clarke, the Foundation’s Executive Director.

“ACT set up the High School CPR Program at St. Mother Teresa High School in 1998, adding the AED training program for students in 2009.”

To date, 8,300 teachers across Canada are trained as CPR instructors for their students and 4.8 million students have learned how to save a life through the ACT High School CPR and Defibrillator Program. Many lives have been saved.

Partner and Community Quotes

AstraZeneca Canada, ACT National Health Partner
Kiersten Combs, President of AstraZeneca Canada
We’re proud to be a long-standing partner of the ACT Foundation – supporting its goal of establishing CPR and defibrillator training in Canadian high schools, providing youth with critical life-saving skills, and raising awareness of the importance of cardiovascular health,” says Kiersten Combs, President of AstraZeneca Canada. “Stories like Zach’s and the quick thinking of his coach Mike Rowley are a great reminder of the impact that initiatives like the ACT High School CPR Program can have by empowering teachers and students to help save lives.”

Amgen Canada, ACT National Health Partner
Dr. Suna Avcil, Executive Medical Director of Amgen Canada
“Amgen is honoured to support the ACT Foundation as a National Health Partner,” says Dr. Suna Avcil, Executive Medical Director of Amgen Canada. “Rescue stories are a testament to the quality of the program and the criticality of ensuring that the education community is equipped with the knowledge and skills to contribute. Together we will continue to advance excellence in science literacy, inspire the next generation, help educators to teach more effectively, and improve access to resources for teachers, students, and society at large.”

Hydro One, ACT Provincial Partner, Ontario
Jay Armitage, Vice President, Marketing & Communications, Hydro One
“We would like to commend Coach Mike for his quick instinct to put his first aid training into action. This real-life rescue demonstrates the importance of equipping young people and their teachers with the lifesaving skills necessary to build safe communities,” said Jay Armitage, Vice President, Marketing & Communications, Hydro One. “Thanks to his CPR and AED training received through the program, Coach Mike had the invaluable tools needed to act fast and save a life.”

Ottawa Catholic School Board, Participating School Board
Tom D’Amico, Director of Education, Ottawa Catholic School Board
“I’m proud of the actions by Coach Mike Rowley. Teachers enter the profession to make a difference in the lives of youth, and in this situation, thanks to his training and the availability of an AED in the school, he was able to save the life of a student athlete.”

About The ACT Foundation

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is the national charitable organization establishing free CPR in Canadian high schools. The program is built on ACT’s award-winning community-based model of partnerships and support, whereby ACT finds local partners who donate the mannequins and AED training units that schools need to deliver the program. High school teachers are trained to teach their students lifesaving skills as a regular part of the curriculum, reaching all youth before graduation. More than 4.8 million youth have been trained in CPR by their teachers through this lifesaving program to date.

The ACT High School CPR and AED Program is made possible with the support of its National Health Partners AstraZeneca Canada and Amgen Canada and its provincial partner Hydro One.

Website:           actfoundation.ca
Twitter:            @actfoundation #ACT2Save
Facebook:        @theactfoundation
Instagram:       @actfoundation
YouTube:          YouTube.com/theactfoundation

The ACT Foundation
Cristiane Doherty, Communications Manager
Mobile: 613-799-9277
cdoherty@actfoundation.ca

 

Basketball coach saves student with CPR and an AED

Zachary, ‘Zach’ as his friends call him, is an energetic Grade 10 student who loves sports, having played competitive hockey and basketball over the years. “No signs of any heart issues EVER in his life,” says Zach’s Mom Stephanie.

However, on October 28 at an after-school basketball tryout – his heart stopped.

“Everything was going well, with students practicing skill drills, and then I asked them to split into playing 5 on 5 games,” recalls teacher and Coach Mike, the OFSAA Boys’ Representative, NCSSAA Convenor, and Boys’ Basketball Coach at St. Mother Teresa High School.

It had been almost two years into the pandemic at that point. Coach Mike hardly knew many of these ‘new’ faces, even more so with their wearing COVID masks while playing basketball.

“I was adding names to my team shortlist when I saw a student come off the court hunched over, says Coach Mike. “It was Zach, and he was gasping for air. At first, I thought it was just the mask and exertion and I told him to take a few minutes on the side while I turned my attention across the gym.”

Suddenly Zach collapsed face-first on the floor sending an echoing thud across the gym that made Mike immediately turn to his aid.

“My instincts kicked in. It was the (ACT) training” says Mike.

“I asked my Assistant Coach, Yvan, to call 911 and clear students out of the gym,” says Mike. “I assessed Zach and started CPR.”

“Coach told me to get the defibrillator right away” recalls Zach’s friend Malacki.

“I ran fast, my friend’s life depended on it. I gave the AED to Coach. He put the pads on Zach and followed the instructions. He knew what to do,” adds Malacki.

In the gym, paramedics took over to revive Zach, continuing to use the school’s AED that had been donated by the ACT Foundation.

“I can tell you as a mom, receiving the phone call was nothing short of traumatic. But to hear over and over in the days that followed from paramedics, ER physicians, and the team of cardiologists, that had the coach not responded so quickly performing CPR and using the AED,  Zach would not be with us today,” says Stephanie. “We are very, very thankful that Coach Mike knew CPR, and that the school had an AED and the Coach was trained in how to use it.  That is what made the difference for Zach.”

Zach underwent open-heart surgery at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) to fix a previously unknown heart defect he has had since birth. Making a full recovery, Zach returned to school in February.

“High schools definitely need to teach CPR,” says Zach. “Most people think that only older people get heart attacks, but look at me, I am living proof that it can happen to anyone. It’s also important to have an AED to make schools safer.”

In the days following Zach’s rescue, Coach Mike suggested that a second AED be installed closer to the gym. The ACT Foundation is working with Zach’s family to help make that donation happen. His mother Stephanie thinks it should be mandated to have an AED in all high schools, especially with all the sports activities. “I would strongly encourage all schools to get one, get an AED now. Do it,” she says. “Because you don’t know until you need one.”

Upon returning to school it was hard for Zach, who had to sit on the sidelines to cheer his teammates. Thanks to the quick lifesaving actions of those around him that night at the try-out, he is able to resume his place on the court with a thumbs up from his health team. Zach is grateful for every precious new day he has ahead. He looks forward to playing sports and driving having successfully acquired another milestone, his license.

ACT RESCUE VIDEO: Zach’s Story

The ACT Foundation set up the High School CPR and AED Program at St. Mother Teresa High School in 1998 for CPR and in 2009 for AED. With the support of community partners, an AED was donated to St. Mother Teresa and Ottawa high schools in 2009.

ACT’s Ontario provincial partner is Hydro One and ACT’s National Health Partners are AstraZeneca Canada, and Amgen Canada.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is the award-winning, national charitable organization establishing free CPR and defibrillator training programs in high schools across Canada. ACT raises funds to donate mannequins and teacher training to schools and guides schools in program set-up and long-term sustainability. More than 4.8 million youth have been trained in CPR by their teachers through this lifesaving program to date.

ACT Foundation enhancing high school CPR training with opioid awareness and overdose response training

(Ottawa, ON, March 29, 2021) The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation announced today it is enhancing the ACT High School CPR and AED Program with an Opioids Overdose Response Training Module.

Support through a contribution from Health Canada’s Substance Use and Addictions Program (SUAP) will enable the ACT Foundation to expand its Ottawa pilot of the opioids awareness and response training to hundreds of high schools across Canada, empowering thousands of students every year.

The ACT High School CPR and AED Program is well established in high schools across the country. Enhancing the program with opioids awareness and response training is a natural next step in equipping youth to respond to life threatening emergencies they may encounter. Knowing the signs and symptoms of an opioid overdose and how to respond can help save lives.

The opioids module will follow ACT’s CPR program delivery model. High school teachers will be trained to teach students to recognize the signs of an opioids overdose, the importance of calling 911 quickly, and how to respond with the use of Naloxone nasal spray, and perform CPR when necessary.

“ACT has successfully delivered the High School CPR and AED Program in high schools across Canada. It is a natural progression to add opioid overdose response training,” says Dr. Justin Maloney, National Medical Director and Chair, ACT Foundation. “We want to empower students and teachers by adding to their lifesaving toolbox.”

“We are really pleased to receive support from Health Canada, enabling the ACT Foundation to expand the opioids overdose response training to thousands of young Canadians through the school program,” says Sandra Clarke, the ACT Foundation’s Executive Director. “This is what ACT does. We empower high school students to save lives.”

The ACT Foundation

The ACT Foundation is the national charitable organization establishing free CPR and AED training in Canadian high schools. The program is built on ACT’s award-winning community-based model of partnerships and support, whereby ACT finds local partners who donate the mannequins and AED training units that schools need to deliver the program. High school teachers are trained to then teach lifesaving skills to their students as a regular part of the curriculum, reaching all youth prior to graduation. The ACT High School CPR and AED Program is made possible with the support of its national partners AstraZeneca Canada and Amgen Canada. The ACT Foundation gratefully acknowledges the financial support of Health Canada for the ACT Opioid Overdose Response Training implementation.

Website: actfoundation.ca
Twitter: @actfoundation #ACT2Save
Facebook: @theactfoundation
Instagram: @actfoundation
YouTube: YouTube.com/theactfoundation

For more information about the ACT Foundation and the ACT Opioid Overdose Response Training contact:

Cristiane Doherty
Communications Manager
The ACT Foundation
cdoherty@actfoundation.ca
Cell: 613-799-9277

Hydro One partners with ACT Foundation to provide critical lifesaving skills to 110,000 students across Ontario

With 80 per cent of cardiac arrests occurring at home, early CPR can increase survival rates

TORONTO, December 4, 2020 – The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation in partnership with Hydro One’s support continues to provide students with the skills necessary to save a life. This year, the provincial collaboration is expected to bring these critical skills to more than 110,000 students and to more rural and First Nations schools. During the time of school closures resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic, the ACT Foundation quickly transitioned to provide schools with access to course theory information online, including the warning signs of a heart attack and stroke and the importance of calling 911 early. The practical CPR hand-on skills training has now resumed for students back in school.

Through the program, high school students are trained in CPR and Automated External Defibrillator (AED) skills, which according to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, when combined early in a life-threatening situation can double the chance of survival. Since 2000, Hydro One has supported the ACT Foundation to successfully train more than two million high school students in CPR.

“The value of lifesaving skills cannot be measured, which is why we ensure our employees are properly trained to respond to medical emergencies that could occur in the workplace, at home or in public,” said Lyla Garzouzi, Chief Safety Officer, Hydro One. “By partnering with the ACT Foundation, we are equipping young people with the skills necessary to act fast and make a lasting difference. Education and training are essential in saving lives and building safe communities.”

In Canada, an estimated 35,000 people suffer out-of-hospital cardiac arrests each year. With 80 per cent of cardiac arrests occurring in homes, empowering youth with CPR training as part of their high school education will help increase citizen CPR response rates and save lives.

“As a national health partner with the ACT Foundation, Amgen Canada is proud to help students learn life-saving skills for life-threatening emergencies, but more importantly, to become champions for health and science in their families and communities,” says Brian Heath, Vice-President and General Manager at Amgen Canada. “We strongly believe in the power of young people to inspire wellness.”

“We are thrilled with the commitment of ACT’s partners,” says ACT Foundation Executive Director Sandra Clarke. “Their support is helping the ACT Foundation enable thousands of students across the province to be emergency ready to respond to serious medical emergencies that can happen to their family members, friends, neighbors and others in their communities.”

ACT’s partners, committed to bringing the program to Ontario are the Government of Ontario and Hydro One and ACT’s national health partners AstraZeneca Canada and Amgen Canada.

The ACT Foundation’s mission is to promote health and empower citizens to save lives! ACT is doing so by establishing the CPR and AED Program in high schools across Canada. The Foundation’s High School CPR and Defibrillator Training Program is built on ACT’s award-winning community-based model of partnerships and support. ACT raises funds for CPR mannequins and AED training units for all high schools, trains teachers as CPR instructors for their students, and guides schools in program set up.

About the ACT Foundation

The ACT Foundation is the national charitable organization establishing the free CPR and AED program in Canadian high schools. The program is built on ACT’s award-winning community-based model of partnerships and support, whereby ACT finds local partners who donate the mannequins and AED training units that schools need to set up the program. High school teachers then teach CPR and how to use a defibrillator to their students as a regular part of the curriculum, reaching all youth prior to graduation. ACT’s partners, committed to bringing the program to Ontario are the Government of Ontario and Hydro one and our national health partners AstraZeneca Canada and Amgen Canada. or on Twitter @actfoundation #ACT2Save

About Hydro One Inc.

Hydro One Limited (TSX: H)

Hydro One Limited, through its wholly-owned subsidiaries, is Ontario’s largest electricity transmission and distribution provider with approximately 1.4 million valued customers, approximately $27.1 billion in assets as at December 31, 2019, and annual revenues in 2019 of approximately $6.5 billion. Our team of approximately 8,800 skilled and dedicated employees proudly build and maintain a safe and reliable electricity system which is essential to supporting strong and successful communities. In 2019, Hydro One invested approximately $1.7 billion in its transmission and distribution networks and supported the economy through buying approximately $1.5 billion of goods and services. We are committed to the communities where we live and work through community investment, sustainability and diversity initiatives. We are designated as a Sustainable Electricity Company by the Canadian Electricity Association. Hydro One Limited’s common shares are listed on the TSX and certain of Hydro One Inc.’s medium term notes are listed on the NYSE. Additional information can be accessed at www.hydroone.com; www.sedar.com or www.sec.gov.

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Teacher saves a stranger with CPR

An ironic chain of events led to an unusual rescue story for Marcia, a high school teacher in Kingston. It began on a winter evening when Marcia was out for dinner. “I noticed an elderly couple having a lively chat over a glass of wine. I was struck by their delightful chemistry, so much so that I paid them compliments on a paper napkin, and anonymously paid for their dinner,” says Marcia.

A few months later, Marcia’s father-in-law tragically passed away from sudden cardiac arrest. No citizen CPR was available for him. Before leaving to meet her husband to help with funeral arrangements, Marcia called her dad, asking him to join her for dinner. At the restaurant, the same as previous, by coincidence, the same elderly couple was again having dinner. However, this time, there was a commotion and Marcia quickly realized the gentleman had collapsed and needed help.
She ran to the man’s side as a server was calling 9-1-1 and people were gathered around.

Marcia is trained in CPR by the ACT High School CPR and AED Program and has taught her students the same lifesaving skills she was about to use herself. “Three of us actually stepped in,” says Marcia. “Another woman checked to see if he was breathing. When we realized he wasn’t (and in cardiac arrest), I started doing chest compressions while another person gave breaths”. Marcia also sent someone to look for an AED but there wasn’t one available.

When EMS arrived, they asked Marcia to continue CPR while they quickly went to work with more lifesaving procedures. The man regained consciousness and was transported to the hospital.
The day after returning to work subsequent to her father-in-laws funeral, a colleague of Marcia’s convinced her to seek out the man whose life she had helped save with CPR. “I went to the hospital that evening and met his daughter and wife and was deeply moved,” she recalls. They were also able to share the irony of meeting again after having Marcia purchase them dinner simply because “they were the cutest couple ever” a few months earlier.

Marcia urges everyone to learn CPR. “Anyone can do it,” she says. “The CPR act itself isn’t complicated, but its impact can be profound.”
Although the man passed away a few weeks later, the family was profoundly grateful to have had the time to spend last moments with their father and husband and say their goodbyes.
The ACT Foundation set up the High School CPR and AED Program in Regiopolis Notre Dame Catholic High School where Marcia works as a teacher. ACT’s provincial partners are the Government of Ontario and Hydro One and ACT’s national health partners are AstraZeneca Canada, Sanofi Canada and Amgen Canada.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is the award-winning, national charitable organization establishing free CPR and defibrillator training programs in high schools across Canada. ACT raises funds to donate mannequins and teacher training to schools and guides schools in program set-up and long-term sustainability. ACT is honoured to be recognized by the Governor General of Canada with the Meritorious Service Cross presented to ACT’s Executive Director Sandra Clarke, and Medical Director and emergency physician Dr Justin Maloney in relation to the ACT High School CPR Program. More than 3.9 million youth have been trained in CPR by their teachers through this lifesaving program to date.

More than 200 students and community members in First Nation Communities of Whitedog and Grassy Narrows to be empowered with lifesaving skills

Ottawa, ON – October 24, 2017 – The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation and lead community partner Hydro One are launching student and community training in CPR and defibrillation in the communities of Whitedog and Grassy Narrows. This initiative will see more than 200 students and community members empowered with essential lifesaving skills.
The media are invited to the event at 9:30 am at Mizhakiiwetung Memorial School, Whitedog, ON P0X 1P0 on October 24, 2017 and Sakatcheway Anishinabe School, 1 Education Drive, Grassy Narrows, ON, P0X1B0 on October 25, 2017.

The ACT Foundation is the charitable organization that is establishing CPR and defibrillator training programs in high schools throughout Ontario and across Canada.
ACT is working in partnership with the Kenora Chiefs Advisory, lead community partner Hydro One, and health partners, AstraZeneca Canada, Sanofi Canada, and Amgen Canada, to bring this program to the communities of Whitedog and Grassy Narrows. This initiative will see each school receives CPR and automated external defibrillator (AED) training mannequins and AED training units.

“Hydro One proudly supports the ACT Foundation’s CPR training because we believe that safety should always come first,” said Derek Chum, Vice President, Indigenous Relations, Hydro One. “Whether at home, school or work, this curriculum will empower students with the skills and knowledge to save lives.”
“Seeing the expansion of ACT to more schools across Canada is a source of great pride for Sanofi Canada, a founding partner in the program,” says Niven Al-Khoury, President and CEO of Sanofi Canada.

Thanks to our partners:
• More than 200 students and community members to be trained in CPR and how to use a defibrillator
• 56 mannequins to be donated
• 8 defibrillator training units to be donated

With eight in 10 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occurring at home or in public places, empowering youth with CPR training as part of their high school education will help increase citizen CPR response rates over the long term.

Early CPR combined with early defibrillation can increase the chance of survival for cardiac arrest victims by up to 75% according to Heart and Stroke Foundation.

“We are thrilled with the support of our partners,” says Sandra Clarke, the ACT Foundation’s Executive Director. “Thanks to them, we are able to bring this lifesaving program to Whitedog and Grassy Narrows, ensuring all youth will be trained. Students and community members will bring their lifesaving skills to current and future families, building stronger communities and saving lives. Consult the link to many rescue stories.”

To date, the ACT Foundation has set up the CPR Program in more than 1,790 high schools nation-wide, empowering more than 3.9 million youth to save lives.

About the ACT Foundation

The ACT Foundation is the national charitable organization that is establishing the free CPR and AED program in Canadian high schools. The program is built on ACT’s award-winning community-based model of partnerships and support, whereby ACT finds local partners who donate the mannequins and AED training units that schools need to set up the program. High school teachers then teach CPR and how to use a defibrillator to their students as a regular part of the curriculum, reaching all youth prior to graduation. ACT’s partners committed to bringing the program to Ontario are provincial partners, the Government of Ontario and Hydro One, and health partners, AstraZeneca Canada, Sanofi Canada, and Amgen Canada.

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For further information, please contact:

Jennifer Edwards
Operations Manager
ACT Foundation
act@actfoundation.ca
Tel: 613-286-5260
Toll: 800-465-9111
www.actfoundation.ca

Twitter.com/actfoundation
Instagram.com/theactfoundation
Faceboook/theactfoundation
YouTube.com/theactfoundation

School staff saves life during volleyball tournament

One evening in March, Karen and Tom were playing in a volley-ball tournament at Chinguacousy Secondary School in Brampton.

“We were in the middle of a game when a man ran in asking if anyone was a doctor,” recalls Tom. “I told him I knew CPR and rushed to the other gym with Karen.”

Upon their arrival, Karen and Tom saw a man collapsed on the floor. Many people were gathered around him. “They thought he had a seizure,” says Karen.

While one of the players dialled 911, the two vice principals checked the man’s vital signs. “He was unconscious and gasping for breath,” says Tom. Immediately, he started CPR while Karen counted the compressions to help him with the pace.

Darlene, high school physical education department head, was in the fitness centre overlooking the gym when she saw the scene. Immediately she ran to get the school’s Automated External Defibrillator (AED). Upon Darlene’s arrival, Karen rushed to the front of the school to guide the paramedics to the gym.

Promptly, Darlene and Tom placed the AED pads on the man and delivered a shock as per the instructions of the machine. Tom continued compressions while Darlene provided artificial respiration before administering a second shock.

Karen returned with the paramedics who took over and transported the man to the hospital.

“I was definitely shaken up right after the incident,” recalls Karen. “It taught me that the most important thing is educating everyone in what to do when a situation like this occurs,” she adds.

Darlene agrees with her. “When we teach CPR to our students, we empower them with the confidence to recognize the emergency and start that chain of help.”

“I would love to see more people trained in CPR,” says Tom. “Having more people out there able to save a life, you can’t put a price on that.”

The ACT High School CPR and AED Program was set up in the Peel Region with the help of ACT’s lead community partners, AstraZeneca Canada, Amgen Canada, and Boehringer Ingelheim Canada Ltd., provincial partners, the Government of Ontario and Hydro One, health partners, AstraZeneca Canada, Sanofi Canada, and Amgen Canada, and many community partners.

Community partners are: BASF Canada Inc., Bayer, Brampton Village Lions Club, EllisDon Corporation, Enersource Corporation, Flower City Kiwanis, Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd., Kiwanis Club of Mississauga South, Loblaws Companies Ltd., Mississauga Central Lions Club, Mississauga Cooksville Lions Club, Mississauga Erin Mills Lions Club, Optimist Club of Brampton, Rotary Club of Bolton, Rotary Club of Bramalea, Rotary Club of Brampton, Rotary Club of Mississauga, Rotary Club of Mississauga Credit Valley AM, Streetsville Lions Club, Takeda Canada Inc. and TransCanada.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is an award-winning, national charitable organization dedicated to establishing free CPR and AED training programs in high schools across Canada. ACT raises funds to donate mannequins and teacher training to schools, and guides schools in program set-up and long-term sustainability. Over 3.6 million youth have been trained in CPR by their teachers through this lifesaving program to date.

7,000 students to receive CPR and defibrillator training every year

April 21, 2017
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

7,000 students to receive CPR and defibrillator training every year

Burlington, ON, 11:00 a.m. – The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation and partners are launching ACT’s High School CPR and Defibrillator Training Program in 28 high schools in the Halton Region. This initiative will see more than 7,000 students empowered by their teachers with essential lifesaving skills every year. The media event is being held at Aldershot High School, 50 Fairwood Pl., Burlington, ON, L7T 1E5.

The ACT Foundation is the charitable organization that is establishing CPR and defibrillator training programs in high schools throughout Ontario and across Canada. Mannequins and defibrillator training units are donated to schools and high school teachers are trained as instructors to train all students prior to graduation.

ACT is working in partnership with health partners, AstraZeneca Canada, Sanofi Canada, and Amgen Canada, and provincial partners, the Government of Ontario and Hydro One, and many community partners to bring this program to the Halton Region high schools.

“Each year, approximately 7,000 Ontarians will experience cardiac arrest either at home or in public. When used in conjunction with CPR in the first few minutes after a cardiac arrest, defibrillation can dramatically improve cardiac arrest survival rates by more than 50 per cent. Providing youth with the tools and confidence to intervene in a life-saving scenario is an important investment that will benefit us all. I am proud of the ACT Foundation and our government for their commitment to improving the cardiac safety of communities across the province,” says Eleanor McMahon, Minister of Tourism, Culture and Sport and MPP for Burlington.

This initiative will see high schools receive training equipment as a result of the Skills4Life Fundraising Campaign which has received the support of many community partners and service clubs. These include lead community partners, AstraZeneca Canada, Amgen Canada, and Boehringer Ingelheim Canada Ltd. Community partners are: Bayer, Halton Hills Hydro Inc., Kiwanis Club of Oakville Inc., Oakville Lions Club, Rotary Club of Acton, Rotary Club of Burlington Central, Rotary Club of Burlington Lakeshore, Rotary Club of Burlington North, Rotary Club of Oakville Trafalgar, and Takeda Canada Inc.

“As a founding partner of the ACT Foundation, it’s very exciting to see the launch of this program come to fruition,” says Ed Dybka, President, AstraZeneca Canada. “At AstraZeneca, we’re proud to contribute to our local communities and I’m inspired to stand beside the many other Halton organizations that have played a part in making this day possible. I also thank the Government of Ontario for their support and the ACT Foundation for their leadership and commitment to this life-saving cause.”
Thanks to our partners in the Halton Region:

• 28 high schools to implement the program
• 7,000 students to be trained in CPR and how to use a defibrillator each year by teachers
• More than 700 CPR mannequins to be donated to schools
• More than 85 defibrillator training units to be donated to schools

With eight in 10 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occurring at home or in public places, empowering youth with CPR training as part of their high school education will help increase citizen CPR response rates over the long term.
“We are thrilled with the support of our partners,” says Sandra Clarke, the ACT Foundation’s Executive Director. “Thanks to them, we are able to bring this lifesaving program to 28 Halton Region high schools, ensuring all youth will be trained. Students will bring their lifesaving skills to current and future families, building stronger communities and saving lives. See link to many rescue stories.”

To date, the ACT Foundation has set up the CPR Program in more than 1,750 high schools nation-wide, empowering more than 3.6 million youth to save lives.

About the ACT Foundation

The ACT Foundation is the national charitable organization that is establishing the free CPR and AED program in Canadian high schools. The program is built on ACT’s award-winning community-based model of partnerships and support, whereby ACT finds local partners who donate the mannequins and AED training units that schools need to set up the program. High school teachers then teach CPR and how to use a defibrillator to their students as a regular part of the curriculum, reaching all youth prior to graduation. ACT’s partners committed to bringing the program to Ontario are provincial partners, the Government of Ontario and Hydro One, and national health partners, AstraZeneca Canada, Sanofi Canada, and Amgen Canada.

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For further information:
Nives Scott
Communications Coordinator
ACT Foundation
comms@actfoundation.ca
Tel: 613-729-3455
Toll: 800-465-9111
www.actfoundation.ca
www.twitter.com/actfoundation
www.instagram.com/theactfoundation
www.youtube.com/theactfoundation
www.facebook/theactfoundation

Youth saves stranger’s life days before Christmas

On a snowy December afternoon, Lane and his wife Jessica were on their way to a coffee shop for a business meeting. “I had just pushed my car out of a snow bank,” recalls Lane.

The next thing he remembers is seeing oncoming traffic on the busy street and moments later he collapsed, unconscious on the side of the road.

When Jessica realized that her husband had gone into sudden cardiac arrest, she panicked and screamed out: “Does anyone know CPR?”

That is when Dylan, a 19-year-old student who was waiting at the bus stop, rushed over to Lane’s side.

“I saw a man on the ground, his face was blue,” remembers Dylan.

While Jessica dialled 911, Dylan pulled Lane off the road with the help of other bystanders. Immediately, he started CPR, a skill he had learned in school.

“At the hospital they told me he was in a stable condition,” says Dylan. “His wife hugged me and thanked me for saving her husband’s life.”

“When I woke up at the hospital, my wife told me a young man named Dylan saved my life with CPR,” says Lane.

Dylan’s foster mother, Lois, couldn’t be prouder of her son. “He came home that day drenched in sweat. He said to me ‘Mom I think I saved a man. I think I saved him,’ ” she shares.

“I never thought I’d have to use CPR in my life,” shares Dylan. “Yet that day a man died and I brought him back to life,” he adds.

Lane’s rescue occurred the day of his daughter’s sixth birthday. He was able to resume his normal activities within a matter of days and to celebrate Christmas with his family.

“Their eight-year-old daughter wrote me a letter which is framed in my room,” says Dylan. “In the letter she says: ‘Dear Dylan, I know you think you aren’t a hero, but you are one to me. I know you work in a restaurant as a cook. My dad taught me how to cook. “
Lane’s wife agrees with her daughter. “My life would have been completely different now if it wasn’t for Dylan,” she says. “He saved a father and a husband.”

The ACT High School CPR and Defibrillator Training Program was set up in Bluevale Collegiate Institute in partnership with lead community partner, Kitchener-Waterloo Emergency Medical Services , provincial partners, the Government of Ontario and Hydro One, and health partners, AstraZeneca Canada, Sanofi Canada, and Amgen Canada.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is the award-winning, national charitable organization dedicated to establishing free CPR and AED training programs in high schools across Canada. ACT raises funds to donate mannequins and teacher training to schools, and guides schools in program set-up and long-term sustainability. Over 3.6 million youth have been trained in CPR by their teachers through this lifesaving program to date.

Special needs youth saves his mother from choking in Toronto

On a warm summer afternoon, Ms. Chandler was preparing a barbecue for her family, while her children played outside. She went to the kitchen to toast bruschetta to go with the meal. Taking a few bites of the baguette, she found herself unable to breathe. “I started chocking. I actually had visions of my whole life passing before my eyes,” she shares about that frightening experience.

In no time, her older son, Matthew, walked into the kitchen. “It’s okay mom, I know what to do,” Matthew exclaimed. With two strong abdominal thrusts, the obstruction flew out. “I’ve never felt so relieved in my whole life,” she recalls. Matthew’s calm energy was much needed to soothe his mother’s fear as he instructed her to sit down and offered her a glass of water. “I was relieved, I thought I was going to lose my mom,” shares Matthew.

Matthew, who is autistic, has learned how to perform the abdominal thrusts through the ACT CPR program in the Marshall McLuhan High School. “I have been taught by Miss. Fitzpatrick how to help someone who is choking. I remembered what to do and I helped my mom. It’s easy to remember and to do,” tells Matthew.

Ms. Fitzpatrick, who was Matthew’s phys-ed teacher says “Having the ACT CPR program in schools is extremely important because it ensures that every single young person across the province gets the same opportunity to learn crucial life saving skills.”
“I am proud because I know that he could go anywhere and help if ever someone is in trouble,” says Ms. Chandler of her son.

The ACT High School CPR program was set up in Marshall McLuhan Catholic Secondary School in 2012 and every year 240 students, like Matthew, learn lifesaving skills. This initiative was made possible thanks to the support of our community partner, Kiwanis Club of Toronto, our provincial partners, Government of Ontario and Hydro One, and our national health partners, Astra Zeneca Canada, Sanofi Canada, and Amgen Canada.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is the award-winning, national charitable organization establishing free CPR and defibrillator training programs in high schools across Canada. ACT raises funds to donate mannequins and teacher training to schools, and guides schools in program set-up and long-term sustainability. Over 3.6 million youth have been trained in CPR by their teachers through this lifesaving program to date.