ACT Foundation enhancing high school CPR training with opioid awareness and overdose response training

(Ottawa, ON, March 29, 2021) The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation announced today it is enhancing the ACT High School CPR and AED Program with an Opioids Overdose Response Training Module.

Support through a contribution from Health Canada’s Substance Use and Addictions Program (SUAP) will enable the ACT Foundation to expand its Ottawa pilot of the opioids awareness and response training to hundreds of high schools across Canada, empowering thousands of students every year.

The ACT High School CPR and AED Program is well established in high schools across the country. Enhancing the program with opioids awareness and response training is a natural next step in equipping youth to respond to life threatening emergencies they may encounter. Knowing the signs and symptoms of an opioid overdose and how to respond can help save lives.

The opioids module will follow ACT’s CPR program delivery model. High school teachers will be trained to teach students to recognize the signs of an opioids overdose, the importance of calling 911 quickly, and how to respond with the use of Naloxone nasal spray, and perform CPR when necessary.

“ACT has successfully delivered the High School CPR and AED Program in high schools across Canada. It is a natural progression to add opioid overdose response training,” says Dr. Justin Maloney, National Medical Director and Chair, ACT Foundation. “We want to empower students and teachers by adding to their lifesaving toolbox.”

“We are really pleased to receive support from Health Canada, enabling the ACT Foundation to expand the opioids overdose response training to thousands of young Canadians through the school program,” says Sandra Clarke, the ACT Foundation’s Executive Director. “This is what ACT does. We empower high school students to save lives.”

The ACT Foundation

The ACT Foundation is the national charitable organization establishing free CPR and AED training in Canadian high schools. The program is built on ACT’s award-winning community-based model of partnerships and support, whereby ACT finds local partners who donate the mannequins and AED training units that schools need to deliver the program. High school teachers are trained to then teach lifesaving skills to their students as a regular part of the curriculum, reaching all youth prior to graduation. The ACT High School CPR and AED Program is made possible with the support of its national partners AstraZeneca Canada and Amgen Canada. The ACT Foundation gratefully acknowledges the financial support of Health Canada for the ACT Opioid Overdose Response Training implementation.

Website: actfoundation.ca
Twitter: @actfoundation #ACT2Save
Facebook: @theactfoundation
Instagram: @actfoundation
YouTube: YouTube.com/theactfoundation

For more information about the ACT Foundation and the ACT Opioid Overdose Response Training contact:

Cristiane Doherty
Communications Manager
The ACT Foundation
cdoherty@actfoundation.ca
Cell: 613-799-9277

68,000 Quebec high school students will be empowered to save lives as they learn how to use an AED in addition to CPR training

Montreal (QUEBEC), November 22, 2019– The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation announced the completion of its fundraising campaign to ensure an automated external defibrillator (AED) for all public high schools in Quebec. In addition, ACT confirmed that every year 68,000 students throughout the province will learn how to use an AED combined with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training to save lives. The event was attended by Danielle McCann, Quebec Health and Social Services Minister, Isabelle Charest, Deputy Minister for Education, and representatives from the public and private sectors.

The ACT Foundation is working in partnership with the Ministry of Health and Social Services and the Ministry of Education and Higher Education to establish high school student CPR and AED training programs throughout the province since 2006. The program sees high schools receive training equipment to enable teachers to train students. This includes AED training units, CPR and AED training mannequins, and program set-up that will see all secondary 3 students empowered with the skills and knowledge to save lives. “When a cardiac arrest occurs, taking action quickly is critical to their chances of survival. Having access to an automated external defibrillator, and knowing what to do while waiting for help, are key elements that will enable students to be ready to save lives. From this perspective, the initiative of the ACT Foundation and its partners is remarkable,” says Danielle McCann, Minister of Health and Social Services.

Research indicates that early CPR, combined with early defibrillation, can increase the chance of survival by up to 75 per cent, according to the Heart and Stroke Foundation. As the importance of public access defibrillators grows, there is increasing focus on the need for an AED in high schools. With high schools receiving an AED, the device will be available for on-site cardiac arrest emergencies involving students and adults. It will also be available for the general public, given the role of high schools as busy community centers with many people passing through their halls each week for adult education, sports and community events.

“This is a remarkable partnership, as secondary 3 students and staff at every public high school in Quebec will be trained and better prepared to respond to emergencies. From a perspective of health and well-being of the population, it will be very useful for these thousands of students in Quebec to learn effective techniques of cardiopulmonary resuscitation early on in their lives,” mentions Isabelle Charest, Deputy Minister of Education.

“CPR training at school is a health initiative that saves lives,” added Dr. Paul Poirier, Cardiologist, IUCPQ (Institut universitaire de cardiologie et de pneumologie de Québec).

With the support of the Quebec Government, ACT’s health partners AstraZeneca Canada, Amgen Canada and Sanofi Canada, cardiologists, the Fédération des médecins spécialistes du Québec (FMSQ), the Fédération des médecins omnipraticiens du Québec (FMOQ) and community partners, the ACT Foundation has completed its fundraising campaign for AEDs for public high schools and continues program roll out.

“As a national health partner with the ACT Foundation, Amgen Canada is proud to help students learn life-saving skills for life-threatening emergencies, but more importantly, to become champions for health and science in their families and communities,” says Brian Heath, member of ACT’s Board of Directors, and Vice-President and General Manager at Amgen Canada. “We strongly believe in the power of young people to inspire wellness.”
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To date, the ACT Foundation has set up the ACT High School CPR Program in more than 1,800 high schools nation-wide, empowering more than 4.6 million youth to save lives.

“We are thrilled with the support from our partners,” said Sandra Clarke, the ACT Foundation’s Executive Director. “With it, we can enhance the CPR program in Quebec high schools with the addition of the AED training component and AED devices for schools. These are lifesaving skills that students will be able to bring to their current and future families and communities.”

The Evolution of the Program in Quebec

ACT launched Phase I in 1997 to set up the CPR training program in 400 public high schools in Quebec. Since then, more than 710,000 students have been trained and 68,000 more are trained in CPR every year. Based on this success, the Government of Quebec made CPR training mandatory in all high schools in November 2017.

During Phase 2 launched in 2011, ACT has focused on enhancing the CPR training program with AED training for students, and on providing AED devices for all public high schools. ACT expects that 68,000 secondary 3 students will be fully trained in both AED and CPR every year.

About the ACT Foundation

The ACT Foundation is the national charitable organization establishing the free CPR and AED program in Canadian high schools. The program is built on ACT’s award-winning community-based model of partnerships and support, whereby ACT finds local partners who donate the mannequins and AED training units that schools need to set up the program. High school teachers then teach CPR and how to use a defibrillator to their students as a regular part of the curriculum, reaching all youth prior to graduation. ACT’s partners, committed to bringing the program to Québec are the Government of Quebec, and our national health partners AstraZeneca Canada, Sanofi Canada, and Amgen Canada.

Website: actfoundation.ca
Twitter: @actfoundation #ACT2Save
Youtube: Youtube.com/theactfoundation
Facebook: @theactfoundation
Instagram: @actfoundation

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For media interviews and information please contact:
Maxime Debeauvais
NATIONAL Public Relations
MDebeauvais@national.ca
Tel: +1-514-843-2393

Jennifer Edwards
Director of Operations
ACT Foundation
jedwards@actfoundation.ca
Tel: +1-613-286-5260
Toll: 800-465-9111

Quebec government makes High School CPR mandatory – 500,000 students already trained

Montreal, Quebec – Congratulations to Sébastien Proulx, Minister of Education, Recreation and Sports, who announced that CPR training will be mandatory for all secondary 3 students throughout Quebec.

The ACT Foundation has been working in partnership with the Ministry of Education, Recreation and Sports, the Ministry of Health and Social Services, and medical directors around the province since 2006 to set up the CPR training program in all public high schools. This began with an initial commitment from the Health Minister at the time, Dr. Philippe Couillard.

Since that time the ACT Foundation has set up the CPR program in 400 public high schools while urging the Quebec government to make CPR training mandatory at the provincial level to ensure the long-term life of the program.

More than 1,600 teachers have been trained as instructors and these teachers have trained over 500,000 secondary students to date, with 68,000 more trained each year. Many lives have already been saved as a result of this lifesaving program (see link for many rescue stories).

The ACT Foundation is the charitable organization that is establishing the high school CPR program throughout Quebec and across Canada. ACT, with the support of its national health partners, AstraZeneca Canada, Sanofi Canada and Amgen Canada, and its community partners have donated more than 11,000 CPR training mannequins to Quebec schools.

With eight in 10 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occurring at home or in public places, empowering youth with CPR training as part of their secondary school education will dramatically increase citizen CPR response rates over the long term and help save many lives.

“We are thrilled that CPR will be mandatory in high schools,” says Sandra Clarke, the ACT Foundation’s Executive Director. “This will ensure the training that we have established in schools through the province will continue over the long term. Students will bring their lifesaving skills to their current and future families, building stronger communities and saving lives.”

The ACT Foundation’s next milestone is working with high schools to add the defibrillator training to the CPR program.

About the ACT Foundation

The ACT Foundation is the national charitable organization that is establishing the free CPR and AED program in Canadian high schools. The program is built on ACT’s award-winning community-based model of partnerships and support. ACT’s Health partners who are committed to bringing the program to Quebec and across Canada are AstraZeneca Canada, Sanofi Canada, and Amgen Canada. To date, the ACT Foundation has set up the CPR Program in more than 1,790 high schools nation-wide, empowering more than 3.9 million youth to save lives.

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For more information:

Carole Nadeau
Project Manager (Quebec)
Fondation ACT
Tel.(direct line): 450-587-5141
Toll free (message): 800-465-5553
cnadeau@actfoundation.ca
www.actfoundation.ca

Twitter.com/actfoundation
Instagram.com/theactfoundation
Facebook/theactfoundation
YouTube.com/theactfoundation

Student learns lifesaving skills and saves his friend the same day

An evening in November, Raphaël and Jean-Philippe met after school at restaurant Mike’s for a get-together with friends. “We started talking about the CPR training we had that day in our phys ed class,” recalls Raphaël.

They were going over the different scenarios together, when suddenly, Jean-Philippe started choking. “J-P can be a bit of a joker, so at first we all thought he was pulling a prank on us,” says Raphaël.

“I wasn’t able to breathe and I felt a pressure in my chest. The people around didn’t realize what was happening.” remembers Jean-Philippe. “I was afraid of what could happen if no one did anything,” he adds.

At that moment, Raphaël jumped in to help his friend. “I noticed that the colour of Jean-Philippe’s skin was changing. I’ve never seen someone so blue in my life,” he says.

Raphaël stood behind his friend and did what he and his friends were talking about just moments before. “I went behind him and I placed my hands right above his navel. I gave him a few strong abdominal thrusts, hoping that what we learned in class really worked,” he recalls.
“Had I not taken my CPR class, I wouldn’t have known what to do,” stresses Raphaël.

“While taking the course, I knew it was important, but I never thought I would be the one needing help,” says Jean-Philippe.

The ACT CPR High School program was implemented in la Polyvalente de La Forêt d’Amos in Quebec in 2015 thanks to the support of the Government of Quebec and health partners, AstraZeneca Canada, Sanofi Canada, Amgen Canada.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is an award-winning, national charitable organization dedicated to establishing CPR and AED training programs in high schools across Canada. ACT raises funds to donate mannequins and teacher training to schools, and guides schools in program set-up and long-term sustainability. Over 3.2 million youth have been trained in CPR by their teachers through this lifesaving program to date.

Student steps in to help a stranger

One morning in May, Michael was on his way to school on his motorbike when he got a flat tire. He decided to get off the road at the next exit, the Saint-Jérome train station and call his grand-mother for help.

“While I was waiting for my grand-mother I noticed a woman laying on a bench in front of the station,” recalls Michael. “She looked asleep.”

Michael walked towards the woman to assess the situation. “I noticed she wasn’t moving so I decided to check her vital signs,” says the young man.

Realizing the woman was unconscious and breathing weakly, he dialled 911 and stayed by her side until the paramedics arrived. “The paramedics told me that my call saved the woman’s life,” says Michael.

The student received CPR training as part of his high school education. “I’m glad that I was trained in CPR because it was so useful to me,” he says.
Michael’s teacher, David Kirk agrees with him. “One of the objectives of the training is to give students the confidence to act. Calling 911 and ensuring safety can save a life. As we repeat it: I’ve been trained, I can do this.”

The ACT High School CPR Program was set up in Cap-Jeunesse School thanks to the support provided by the Government of Quebec and ACT’s health partners, AstraZeneca Canada, Sanofi Canada, and Amgen Canada.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is an award-winning, national charitable organization dedicated to establishing CPR and AED training programs in high schools across Canada. ACT raises funds to donate mannequins and teacher training to schools, and guides schools in program set-up and long-term sustainability. Over 3.6 million youth have been trained in CPR by their teachers through this lifesaving program to date.

130 Magdalen Islands students to receive lifesaving CPR and defibrillator training every year

Magdalen Islands, Quebec – With eight in 10 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occurring at home or in public places, empowering youth with CPR training as part of their high school education will save lives. The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation and partners officially launched the ACT High School CPR and Defibrillator Training Program in Eastern Shores School Board and la Commission scolaire des Îles.

Through this initiative, 130 students from Eastern Shores School Board’s Grosse Ile School, and la Commission scolaire des Îles’ la Polyvalente des Îles school will graduate every year with the lifesaving CPR skills and knowledge on how to use an Automated External Defibrillator (AED).

The ACT Foundation is the charitable organization that is establishing free CPR and defibrillator training programs in secondary schools throughout Quebec and across Canada. ACT is working in partnership with the Ministry of Education, Recreation and Sports and the Ministry of Health and Social Services, with local support from Germain Chevarie, MNA for Îles-de-la-Madeleine, as well as health partners AstraZeneca Canada, Sanofi Canada, and Amgen Canada to bring this program to the Magdalen Islands high schools.

This program was also made possible thanks to our Magdalen Islands community partners, listed in alphabetical order : À Marée Basse, Ambulance Leblanc, Autobus Les Sillons, Caisse populaire Havre-aux-Maisons, Caisse populaire des Ramées, Coopérative des Pêcheurs de Cap Dauphin, Du Coeur aux Soins, Fruits de Mer Madeleine, Gestion CTMA, IGA Coop de Fatima, IGA Coop de la Vernière, IGA Coop Havre-aux-Maisons, Mines Seleine, Pascan Aviation.

Funding will see participating secondary schools receive training equipment to enable teachers to train students. This includes Automated External Defibrillator (AED) training units, AED training mannequins, and program set-up that will see all students graduate with the skills and knowledge to save lives.

“I am very pleased to contribute to the success and the realisation of such an important program. Magdalen Islands students are now better equipped to respond to emergency situations, and that in itself will only make them better citizens,” declares Mr. Germain Chevarie, MNA, Îles-de-la-Madeleine, National Assembly.

“The Polyvalente des Îles students who are benefiting from this training and the equipment available to them, may one day need to save a life. What a great training for them! We’d like to thank the generous partners,” say Brigitte Aucoin, Executive Director, Commission scolaire des Îles, and Karen Renaud, principal, École Polyvalente des Îles.

“Great initiative by the ACT Foundation! We are indebted to community partners for supporting this initiative financially. Working together, we can make a difference for our students,” says Hugh Wood, Principal, Grosse Ile School.

To date, the ACT High School CPR Program has been established in 190 Quebec high schools and more than 500 000 students have already been empowered to save lives with CPR.

“As a founding partner of the ACT Foundation and a longstanding employer of the city of Laval, we are proud to make an additional financial contribution to the Foundation, so that local high school students learn the critical skills and know-how to save lives,” says Niven Al-Khoury, General Manager, Diabetes and Cardiovascular Care, Sanofi Canada. ”For Sanofi, providing local youth with lifesaving skills is a natural fit with our long cardiovascular heritage and we stand firmly behind the organization’s lifesaving training programs that ensure students are trained and empowered to use CPR and AEDs.”

“We are thrilled with the support from our partners. With it, we can enhance the CPR program in the two Magdalen Islands high schools», says Sandra Clarke, the ACT Foundation’s Executive Director.

About the ACT Foundation

The ACT Foundation is the national charitable organization that is establishing the free CPR and AED program in Canadian high schools. The program is built on ACT’s award-winning community-based model of partnerships and support, whereby ACT finds local partners who donate the mannequins and AED training units that schools need to set up the program. Secondary school teachers then teach CPR and how to use a defibrillator to their students as a regular part of the curriculum, reaching all youth prior to graduation. ACT’s partners who are committed to bringing the program to Quebec are the Government of Quebec, and our national health partners, AstraZeneca Canada, Sanofi Canada, and Amgen Canada. To date, the ACT Foundation has set up the CPR Program in more than 1,755 high schools nation-wide, empowering more than 3.6 million youth to save lives.

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Pour plus d’information:

Nives Scott
Communications Coordinator
ACT Foundation
comms@actfoundation.ca
Tel: 613-729-3455
Toll: 800-465-9111
www.actfoundation.ca
www.youtube.com/theactfoundation
www.facebook/theactfoundation
www.twitter.com/actfoundation

Laval High Schools to receive CPR and Automated External Defibrillator Training

Laval High Schools to receive CPR and Automated External Defibrillator Training
Sanofi Canada celebrates World Heart Day by Investing in Laval Youth

Laval, QC, September 29, 2016 – The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is pleased to announce that students from the Commission scolaire de Laval and the Sir Wilfrid Laurier School Board will benefit from lifesaving CPR and Automated External Defibrillator (AED) training, thanks to an additional donation from its national partner, Sanofi Canada, made on World Heart Day.

The donation is a boost for the Laval component of the ACT Foundation’s CPR secondary school program in Quebec, which is made possible through the support of both, health partners and the Government of Quebec. With Sanofi’s support, the Foundation’s lead Laval community partner, more than 2,500 students from the Commission scolaire de Laval and the Sir Wilfrid Laurier School Board will graduate every year with the lifesaving CPR skills and knowledge on how to use an AED.

Funding will see all public high schools (with sec. III, IV, and V) receive training equipment, including AED training units and training mannequins, as well as teacher training as Instructors to enable teachers to train all students with the skills and knowledge to save lives.

“As a founding partner of the ACT Foundation and a longstanding employer in the city of Laval, we are proud to make an additional financial contribution to the Foundation, so that local high school students learn the lifesaving skills of CPR and are trained to use AEDs. Sanofi has a long heritage in cardiovascular care and this is one way for us to give back to the community where we operate and where many of our employees live,” says Niven Al-Khoury, General Manager, Diabetes and Cardiovascular Care and Canada Country Chair, Sanofi.”

The ACT Foundation is the charitable organization that is establishing free CPR and defibrillator training programs in high schools throughout Quebec and across Canada. ACT is working in partnership Sanofi Canada as a lead community partner for Laval to bring this program to all nine (9) Laval high schools: Centre de qualification professionnelle et d’entrepreneuriat de Laval, École secondaire Curé-Antoine-Labelle, École secondaire Georges-Vanier, École secondaire Horizon-Jeunesse, École d’éducation internationale de Laval, École secondaire Leblanc, École secondaire Mont-de-LaSalle; École secondaire Saint-Maxime, and Laval Senior Academy.

For Louise Lortie, President of the Commission scolaire de Laval, the massive launch of this program in Laval high schools is not just an added value for the students, but also for the entire community. “Our schools are in the heart of Laval neighborhoods and they serve as a gathering place, for students, as well as for citizens. Our facilities and our equipment are readily available to the community. CPR and AED training, as well as the access to the medical equipment will enable us to save lives while contributing to the well-being of our community.”

With eight in 10 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occurring at home or in public places, empowering all youth with CPR and AED training as part of their high school education will dramatically increase citizen emergency response rates over the long term.

Early CPR combined with early defibrillation can increase chance of survival for cardiac arrest victims by up to 75% according to Heart and Stroke Foundation.

“We are thrilled with Sanofi’s support,” says Sandra Clarke, the ACT Foundation’s Executive Director. “With it, we can enhance the CPR program in Laval high schools with AED training, which is especially timely with AEDs becoming more available in public places. These are lifesaving skills that students will be able to bring to their current and future families and communities.”

To date, the ACT Foundation, with the support of its health partners, and in partnership with the Government of Quebec, has set up the CPR Program in 400 high schools across the province and more than 440,000 students have already been empowered to save lives with CPR. ACT is now enhancing the program with AED training for youth.

About the ACT Foundation

The ACT Foundation is the national charitable organization that is creating a culture of lifesaving by establishing the CPR and AED program in all high schools. The program is built on ACT’s award-winning community-based model of partnerships and support, whereby ACT finds local partners who donate the mannequins and AED training units that schools need to set up the program. High school teachers then teach CPR and how to use a defibrillator to their students as a regular part of the curriculum, reaching all youth prior to graduation. ACT’s partners who are committed to bringing the program to Quebec are the Government of Quebec, and our national health partners, AstraZeneca Canada, Pfizer Canada and Sanofi Canada. To date, the ACT Foundation has set up the CPR Program in more than 1,700 high schools nation-wide, empowering more than 3.2 million youth to save lives.

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For further information, please contact:

ACT Foundation:
Nives Scott
Communications Coordinator
comms@actfoundation.ca
Tel: 613-729-3455
Toll: 800-465-9111
www.actfoundation.ca
www.youtube.com/theactfoundation
www.facebook/theactfoundation
www.twitter.com/actfoundation

Sanofi Canada:
Catherine Cunningham
Head of Communications, Canada
catherine.cunningham@sanofi.com
Tel: 514-956-6120
https://www.sanofi.ca/
@SanofiCanada
youtube.com/user/sanoficanada

Student saves a teen at festival

One Friday in September, William and his friends were enjoying an evening of music and fun at the “Festival Western de St-Tite”, when an emergency struck.

“Throughout the night, I noticed one of the guys nearby had been drinking far too much. I tried stopping him, but he wouldn’t listen to me, so I kept an eye on him.” Not long after, William saw the young man collapse to the ground.

“Right away, I ran up to him and placed him in the recovery position so he wouldn’t choke on his vomit.” As people gathered around the young man, William managed the scene with confidence. “I was the only one there who knew what to do because of the high school training I received,” he shares.

After calling 911, he asked everyone to create space so the young man could get some fresh air. He monitored him until the arrival of the paramedics. “In the ambulance, his heart stopped beating, so they had to defibrillate him.”

“I feel happy that I intervened so rapidly. If nobody had done anything, he might have not lived. Thankfully, he’s doing very well now.”

Speaking of the CPR training he’s received through the ACT High School CPR Program in his physical education class, William says “As soon as I saw him collapse, my reflex was to revert back to the CPR that I learned at school.”

William’s teacher, Mr. Trahan agrees with him – “Being CPR trained, he was able to react with confidence and without hesitation.”

The ACT High School CPR Program was set up in Paul-Le-Jeune High School thanks to the support provided by the Government of Quebec and ACT’s health partners, AstraZeneca Canada, Pfizer Canada and Sanofi Canada.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is an award-winning, national charitable organization dedicated to establishing CPR and AED training programs in high schools across Canada. ACT raises funds to donate mannequins and teacher training to schools, and guides schools in program set-up and long-term sustainability. Over 3.2 million youth have been trained in CPR by their teachers through this lifesaving program to date.

Montreal students save teammate’s life with CPR & an AED

One evening in April, Jimmy, 17, and Malik, 16, were playing their weekly game of ball hockey, involving parents, students and other community members, in the gym of a local school in their Montreal neighbourhood.
As Malik was getting ready to leave the gym, he saw one of his teammates, Marc, 47, collapse.

“At first, I didn’t know what was going on, but very quickly we saw his face turn blue and we realized he wasn’t breathing” Malik says.

During that time, Jimmy was in the dressing room unaware of the situation. “My dad ran up to me and asked me to call 911,” he recalls. Jimmy then rushed to the gym to see what was happening. QuoteJimmyandMalik

“As soon as I saw Marc lying on the ground without any vital signs, I panicked. I got the urge to run away, but then I recalled the CPR training I received in high school and knew I needed to do something,” he says.

While the school custodian, Jean-Christophe, who is also the team coach, ran to get the school Automated External Defibrillator (AED), Jimmy and Malik took charge of the situation and quickly started CPR.

“The AED was very easy to use because it told us exactly what to do,” they say. “The instructions given by the AED were extremely helpful during the procedure,” acknowledges Malik.

The two boys continued following the instructions given by the defibrillator, alternating between compressions and defibrillation until the arrival of the paramedics and firefighters.

A week later, during their ball hockey practice, Jimmy and Malik found out that Marc was alive and well.

While Malik recognizes the AED as an essential lifesaving machine, Marc’s wife, Anne-Marie commends the two boys for saving her husband’s life.

“The paramedics told me that what Jimmy and Malik did was paramedic work that day. Thanks to the ACT training they received from their teacher Mrs. Gagnon, we still have my husband by our side. Without that initiative, he would have died,” she says.

“I could have never anticipated that moment, it all happened so quickly,” admits Jimmy. “Having the High School CPR training under my belt gave me the confidence I needed to know what to do and to know how to act. Without it, I wouldn’t have put myself in the midst of the action,” he adds.

The ACT High School CPR program was set up in École secondaire de la Pointe-aux-Trembles, Montreal in 2007 thanks to the support provided by the Government of Quebec. ACT’s health partners supporting the program in Montreal, throughout Quebec and across Canada are AstraZeneca Canada, Pfizer Canada and Sanofi Canada. They provide ACT’s sustaining funding and are committed to the Foundation’s national goal of promoting health and empowering Canadians to save lives.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is an award-winning, national charitable organization dedicated to establishing free CPR and AED training programs in high schools across Canada. ACT raises funds to donate mannequins and teacher training to schools, and guides schools in program set-up and long-term sustainability. Over 3.2 million youth have been trained in CPR by their teachers through this lifesaving program to date.

Student saves the life of a restaurant employee with CPR

One evening in June, during a visit to Quebec City, Jean-Philippe and his brother decided to go to a pizza restaurant for dinner. “As soon as we walked into the restaurant, we noticed that everyone was panicking,” he recalls.

Almost immediately, Jean-Philippe understood the reason. “A man was collapsed on the ground of the restaurant. His face was blue,” he describes. The man in question was Jacques, a restaurant employee. “I was on my break, having a soft drink at the counter of the restaurant when I collapsed,” recalls Jacques.

After making sure that the employees called 911, Jean-Philippe took charge of the situation. “Within seconds I realized he had no vital signs, so I started the compressions.” “I told myself that if I don’t, he won’t live,” explains Jean-Philippe. It’s his sense of duty that kept the young man in a state of trance as he continued with the compressions until the arrival of the paramedics.
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“I knew exactly what to do because of the CPR training I received in high school,” says Jean-Philippe, who recalls getting a lot of practice in his CPR class from his physical education teacher, Larry Adams.

“Not only did Jean-Philippe keep the man alive, he also saved his life,” explains his teacher, Mr.Adams.

Jacques, who suffered a cardiac arrest, agrees with Mr.Adams, “Had Jean-Philippe not done CPR on me, I wouldn’t be here today.”

The ACT High School CPR Program was set up in 2007 at La Polyvalente Jean-Dolbeau in Lac Saint-Jean. In 2013, the program was enhanced with the addition of the ACT High School Defibrillator Training Program, which was made possible thanks to the support of the Government of Quebec, our lead community partner, Rio Tinto Alcan, and ACT’s health partners, AstraZeneca Canada, Pfizer Canada, and Sanofi Canada.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is an award-winning, national charitable organization dedicated to establishing CPR and AED training programs in high schools across Canada. ACT raises funds to donate mannequins and teacher training to schools, and guides schools in program set-up and long-term sustainability. Over 3.2 million youth have been trained in CPR by their teachers through this lifesaving program to date.