Student steps in to help a stranger

One morning in May, Michael was on his way to school on his motorbike when he got a flat tire. He decided to get off the road at the next exit, the Saint-Jérome train station and call his grand-mother for help.

“While I was waiting for my grand-mother I noticed a woman laying on a bench in front of the station,” recalls Michael. “She looked asleep.”

Michael walked towards the woman to assess the situation. “I noticed she wasn’t moving so I decided to check her vital signs,” says the young man.

Realizing the woman was unconscious and breathing weakly, he dialled 911 and stayed by her side until the paramedics arrived. “The paramedics told me that my call saved the woman’s life,” says Michael.

The student received CPR training as part of his high school education. “I’m glad that I was trained in CPR because it was so useful to me,” he says.
Michael’s teacher, David Kirk agrees with him. “One of the objectives of the training is to give students the confidence to act. Calling 911 and ensuring safety can save a life. As we repeat it: I’ve been trained, I can do this.”

The ACT High School CPR Program was set up in Cap-Jeunesse School thanks to the support provided by the Government of Quebec and ACT’s health partners, AstraZeneca Canada, Sanofi Canada, and Amgen Canada.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is an award-winning, national charitable organization dedicated to establishing CPR and AED training programs in high schools across Canada. ACT raises funds to donate mannequins and teacher training to schools, and guides schools in program set-up and long-term sustainability. Over 3.6 million youth have been trained in CPR by their teachers through this lifesaving program to date.

Haida Gwaii Teacher saves student from choking

It was an exciting day before Christmas break at Queen Charlotte Secondary School. Emmy, food and nutrition class teacher was getting ingredients at the pantry next to the school’s kitchen to make gingerbread houses with her class.

“I just finished training my students in CPR that week,” says Emmy. “As I was walking back to the kitchen, I noticed a student who wasn’t part of my class following me, her hands clutching her neck.”

Emmy quickly realized the young girl was choking. “She looked scared. I asked her if she could breathe and she nodded no.”

Immediately, Emmy asked a couple of her own students to go call the emergency services as she proceeded with abdominal thrusts on the young girl. After the fifth thrust, the young girl started to breathe again.

“It was very surreal. I was completely on auto-pilot,” recalls Emmy who was trained as an ACT High School CPR and AED instructor a couple of months prior. She’s demonstrated the Obstructed Airway Manoeuvre at least a dozen of times in front of her class the week leading to the incident.

“Practicing CPR gives you confidence, which makes all the difference. If I had not received the ACT training, and if I had not delivered the course to my class, I would have not known what to do,” she shares.
The ACT High School CPR and AED Program was set up in Queen Charlotte Secondary School in Haida Gwaii, thanks to the support of community partner, RBC, provincial partner, BC Emergency Health Services (BCEHS) paramedics and staff, and health partners AstraZeneca Canada, Sanofi Canada, and Amgen Canada.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is an award-winning, national charitable organization dedicated to establishing CPR and AED training programs in high schools across Canada. ACT raises funds to donate mannequins and teacher training to schools, and guides schools in program set-up and long-term sustainability. Over 3.6 million youth have been trained in CPR by their teachers through this lifesaving program to date.

Grade 12 helps younger student during seizure

One afternoon in June, Nicole, a Grade 12 student from London was doing circuit lunges with a Grade 9 student as part of a leadership gym class. “As we were moving on to the next circuit, the girl I was paired up with froze with weights still in her hands,” recalls Nicole.

Thinking the young girl may have been confused about her instructions, Nicole proceeded to take the weights from her hands. “She suddenly started falling backwards. I did my best to slow the fall so her head wouldn’t hit the ground,” shares Nicole. As she fell, the Grade 9 student started shaking uncontrollably.

Nicole will always remember the sight of the young girl in the midst of a seizure. As her teacher, called 911, Nicole checked for the girl’s vital signs. After making sure the student was breathing and had a pulse, Nicole proceeded to put her in the recovery position, placing a shirt under her head to protect it.

“I was surprised at how calm I remained,” says Nicole. “I knew I needed to stay calm because that would reassure the student,” she adds.

Once the student stopped seizing, Nicole started talking to her. “I was asking her simple questions. At first, she didn’t answer, but I persisted, asking the same questions over and over again, and she started talking.”

When the ambulance arrived, the young girl panicked, but Nicole reassured her. “I told her everything would be fine, and that they’re just going to examine her.” She stayed by her side until the student was transported to the hospital.

When recalling the incident, Nicole admits “I’ve never had to face something like that. I want to be a firefighter and this experience definitely prepared me in knowing what to do.” Later, the young girl approached Nicole to let her know what an inspiration she was to her.

“There is great value in teaching students CPR, as a regular part of the Health and Physical Education (HPE) program in secondary school. All students have to take at least one HPE credit as part of their secondary school programming. Most students tend to take this mandatory credit in grade 9. As a result, we have the opportunity to positively influence almost all the grade 9 students in our school, each year,” says Jodie Hauch, Physical and Health Education Department Head

“Being CPR trained is so important. If something like this happens, you are prepared and you know what to do,” attests Nicole. “It also looks great on your resume. I am taking soccer at Cape Breton University and my program requires me to be CPR certified,” she adds.

The ACT High School CPR Program was set up in H. B. Beal Secondary School thanks to provincial partners, the Government of Ontario, Hydro One, and ACT’s national health partners, AstraZeneca Canada, Sanofi Canada, and Amgen Canada.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is an award-winning, national charitable organization dedicated to establishing free CPR and AED training programs in high schools across Canada. ACT raises funds to donate mannequins and teacher training to schools, and guides schools in program set-up and long-term sustainability. Over 3.6 million youth have been trained in CPR by their teachers through this lifesaving program to date.

Ontario student saves father’s life with CPR

It was the middle of the night when Shane, a 17 year old Hamilton student, was awoken by a loud sound. It was his mom screaming out his name. “I knew something was wrong,” says Shane who rushed downstairs to find Tim, his father, unresponsive on the floor.

While his younger brother, Jordan, called 911 and ran to get help from the neighbour, who is also a nurse, Shane quickly jumped in and started CPR. “It was a fight or flight response,” says Shane. “I felt completely level-headed,” he adds.

When the neighbour arrived, she took over compressions while Shane did the breathing. Together, they continued CPR until the paramedics arrived. Tim was defibrillated twice before he was transported by the paramedics.

“At the hospital, I kept pacing around the floor,” remembers Shane. “When the doctor came out after surgery and told me my father was doing well I cried,” he says.

Tim, a healthy 50-year-old, says his owes his life to his son. “I wouldn’t be where I am today if it wasn’t for Shane. I am just happy to be able to wake up every morning,” he says.

“Not in a million years did I think I’d ever have to use the CPR I learned in high school. You never think it’s going to happen to you, or someone close to you,” he says about the high school CPR training he received in Sherwood Secondary School.

Shane, who hopes to one day work in the health field, will be taking health and fitness at Mohawk College in the fall. He hopes he can use his father’s story to convince people of the importance of CPR. “I don’t know what I would have done without the training,” he adds.

The ACT High School CPR Program was set up in Hamilton high schools in partnership with lead community partner, First Ontario Credit Union, provincial partners, the Government of Ontario and Hydro One, and health partners, AstraZeneca Canada, Sanofi Canada, and Amgen Canada.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is the award-winning, national charitable organization dedicated to establishing free CPR and AED training programs in high schools across Canada. ACT raises funds to donate mannequins and teacher training to schools, and guides schools in program set-up and long-term sustainability. Over 3.6 million youth have been trained in CPR by their teachers through this lifesaving program to date.

Seventeen-year-old helps a stranger in an emergency

On a winter morning, Mariah, 17, her dad, and brother were driving to school in York, Ontario, when they saw a pedestrian slip on ice, hitting his head on the ground. Immediately, they pulled over and got out of the car.

“He was in and out of consciousness at the time and blood was coming out of his ears. We quickly called 911 and put a blanket over him to keep him warm,” says Mariah who remained calm during the incident.

“It wasn’t long until he regained consciousness. He tried getting up, but we explained to him that the paramedics were on their way and that it was important for him not to move,” she adds.

When the ambulance arrived, Mariah helped the paramedics get their tools out of their bag. “I always had an interest in health studies and having these skills makes me want to pursue health sciences as a career choice,” she says.
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“It was a little bit scary being in that situation, but remaining calm and knowing what to do thanks to my CPR classes, gave me an advantage,” shares Mariah, who was trained in CPR by her high school teacher, Ms. Kathryn Dawe.

“As a health and physical education teacher I strongly believe that learning CPR instills confidence when dealing with stressful and life threatening situations. Mariah was clearly able to assess the victim and deliver the appropriate information to the paramedics,” says Ms. Dawe. “Knowing these valuable skills will increase the chances of survival, ensure bystander safety, and create responsible members of the community,” she adds.

The ACT High School CPR and AED program was set up in Thornlea Secondary School in York in partnership with community partners, IBM Canada Ltd, Molise Kleinburg Estates, Nashville Developments Inc., and TransCanada Corporation, provincial partners, the Government of Ontario, and Hydro One, and ACT’s national health partners, AstraZeneca Canada, Sanofi Canada and Amgen Canada.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is an award-winning, national charitable organization dedicated to establishing CPR and AED training programs in high schools across Canada. ACT raises funds to donate mannequins and teacher training to schools, and guides schools in program set-up and long-term sustainability. Over 3.6 million youth have been trained in CPR by their teachers through this lifesaving program to date.

Teen saves twin brother with CPR

On a spring day, Kyle, 15, was getting ready for school at home in Moncton, when he and his mom heard a loud noise coming from the bathroom. Kyle and his mother, rushed to the bathroom where they found Kyle’s twin brother, Kolten, collapsed on the floor unconscious and not breathing.

After calling 911, Kyle quickly started the compressions on his brother while his mother remained on the phone with the dispatcher. He continued CPR until the arrival of the paramedics. Kolten was then treated and transported by Emergency Medical Services (EMS) to a hospital where he regained consciousness after several days.

Kyle learned CPR at his high school during a physical education class offered by his high teacher, Craig Eagles. “When I found out Kyle saved his brother, I was amazed. I’ve been teaching for 16 years, but CPR is the most rewarding thing I ever taught. It gives you the skills to save a life,” says Kyle’s teacher Craig.

“The Department of Medicine at the Moncton hospital sponsored four local high schools to initiate the ACT program. Amazingly in the first year a 15 year old student, Kyle, used his newly taught CPR skills to save his twin brother,” says Dr. Mary MacSween. “This powerful story was instrumental in convincing the entire physician staff of the hospital to fund an expansion of the initiative to neighbouring rural high schools. Our community is clearly safer due to this remarkable program and we are grateful for the wonderful support of the ACT team in implementing this valuable life skill in our students,” she adds.

The ACT High School CPR & AED program was set up in Moncton High School in Moncton, New Brunswick thanks to the Moncton Hospital Medical Staff Association, New Brunswick EMS and ACT’s national heath partners, AstraZeneca Canada, Pfizer Canada and Sanofi Canada.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is an award-winning, national charitable organization dedicated to establishing CPR and AED training programs in high schools across Canada. ACT raises funds to donate mannequins and teacher training to schools, and guides schools in program set-up and long-term sustainability. Over 3.2 million youth have been trained in CPR by their teachers through this lifesaving program to date.

Toronto Teacher uses CPR and AED skills on three people

When Peter McKenzie, a Toronto physical education teacher, trains his Grade 9 students in CPR he tells them, “I never thought I’d have to use these skills, but I did, on three different people.”

At the right place at the right time, Peter was able to use his life-saving skills and knowledge on three distinct occasions.

“I was playing ultimate Frisbee off the school property with a group of people when a player collapsed on the field next to ours” remembers Peter who quickly assessed the situation and realized the man was unconscious and not breathing. As another bystander dialled 911 and started CPR, Peter ran to get the Automated External Defibrillator (AED).

“AEDs are very simple to use with even the slightest amount of training. Knowing that it is impossible to harm a person by using an AED incorrectly has given me the confidence to use an AED for three different medical emergencies,” he says.
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After a single shock the man regained consciousness before the arrival of the paramedics. “It was truly miraculous,” says Peter. “My biggest contribution was recognizing one of the signs of cardiac arrest and retrieving the AED as fast as I could,” he adds.

The second life saved was that of a student during a game of lunch hour basketball. A player ran over to Peter to let him know that one of the students, had collapsed. “I could tell he was unresponsive as soon as I saw him on the ground,” says Peter. “I called the office and told them to dial 911 and to send the AED to the gym.” Peter alternated between CPR and shocks until the arrival of the paramedics. The student is now alive and well because Peter knew what to do.

On another occasion, a student had suffered a sudden cardiac arrest during his physical education class. “He just collapsed on the gym floor,” Peter recalls. He immediately prepared the AED for use and proceeded with CPR. Despite all efforts to resuscitate him, the student never regained consciousness. Looking back on the tragic event, Peter says, “It has been difficult to cope with this tragedy and to witness the family’s grief but I feel some comfort in knowing that I did everything I could,

Speaking of the importance of high school CPR training for his students, Peter says, “Teaching CPR and AED skills empowers my students to feel they can help in even the most serious of medical emergencies. By using these skills they may one day save the life of a loved one. Even if their attempts at resuscitation are unsuccessful, they may at least take comfort in knowing they didn’t stand idly by but did all they could to save a life.”

The ACT High School CPR and AED program was set up in Greenwood Secondary School in Toronto, in partnership with provincial partners, the Government of Ontario, Hydro One and The Ontario Trillium Foundation, and ACT’s national health partners, AstraZeneca Canada, Pfizer Canada and Sanofi Canada.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is an award-winning, national charitable organization dedicated to establishing free CPR and AED training programs in high schools across Canada. ACT raises funds to donate mannequins and teacher training to schools, and guides schools in program set-up and long-term sustainability. Over 3.2 million youth have been trained in CPR by their teachers through this lifesaving program to date.

Sudbury Student’s Life Saved with CPR

One afternoon in February, students Jordan Hambley and Jordan Wood-Spadafore were sitting on the stairs in front of their school waiting for the bus to arrive when they saw a younger student collapse in front of them.

“I went up and asked him if he was okay, but he didn’t respond,” recalls Jordan H.

“As Jordan H. ran to the main office for help, I stayed by the boy’s side. I panicked, but I remembered my high school CPR class and knew I had to do something, so I put him in the recovery position and checked his vital signs,” shares Jordan W.

Teacher Kyle Gutscher, who was made aware of the incident quickly went to get his CPR trained colleague, Mr. Craig Flanagan. While the vice principal, Mr. Wilson called 911, Jordan H. returned with Mr.Flanagan. and the Lively District Secondary School principal, Ms. Leslie Mantle. The principal and the teacher quickly saw the boy had no vital signs and knew they had to start CPR. Brian Schouten, a Grade 12 student ran to get the school defibrillator.
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During that time, Dylan Brown, a Grade 8 student saw what was going on from the bus. “Dylan is a good friend of the boy, and he immediately wanted to help. He remembered that his friend Lucas Howlands’ mom, Charlene Howland was picking him up at school and that she was a nurse. So Dylan immediately sent a text to Lucas about what was happening,” says Ms. Mantle. When Lucas and Charlene saw the text, they immediately rushed to the scene.

Working as a team, Charlene and Mr. Flanagan started performing chest compressions and artificial respiration on the young boy, while staff member Ms. Mathias helped guide by counting out loud.

The boy started breathing shortly before the paramedics arrived. Today, the student is alive thanks to the team effort of so many that day. Each and every one of their actions played an integral role in the chain of survival that helped save the life of a student during a sudden cardiac arrest.

“After this experience, I approached my physical education teacher and asked to have a CPR refresher course,” shares Jordan H. “Knowing CPR gave me the necessary confidence to take responsibility and react immediately,” he adds.

“I have been teaching the ACT Foundation CPR and AED program since it was first introduced to the high school students. It is an amazing program and is one of the most beneficial, not to mention life saving skills that our Grade 9 students learn and take with them for the rest of their lives. I am very proud of our students for knowing how to react in an emergency situation and for using their learned skills from the ACT Program to help save a fellow student’s life,” says physical education teacher, Kimberly Chezzi.

The ACT High School CPR and AED program was set up in Lively District Secondary School in partnership with lead community partner Vale and other community partners, provincial partners, the Government of Ontario, Hydro One and Ontario Trillium Foundation and ACT’s national health partners, AstraZeneca Canada, Pfizer Canada and Sanofi Canada.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is an award-winning, national charitable organization dedicated to establishing free CPR and AED training programs in high schools across Canada. ACT raises funds to donate mannequins and teacher training to schools, and guides schools in program set-up and long-term sustainability. Over 3.2 million youth have been trained in CPR by their teachers through this lifesaving program to date.

Student saves a teen at festival

One Friday in September, William and his friends were enjoying an evening of music and fun at the “Festival Western de St-Tite”, when an emergency struck.

“Throughout the night, I noticed one of the guys nearby had been drinking far too much. I tried stopping him, but he wouldn’t listen to me, so I kept an eye on him.” Not long after, William saw the young man collapse to the ground.

“Right away, I ran up to him and placed him in the recovery position so he wouldn’t choke on his vomit.” As people gathered around the young man, William managed the scene with confidence. “I was the only one there who knew what to do because of the high school training I received,” he shares.

After calling 911, he asked everyone to create space so the young man could get some fresh air. He monitored him until the arrival of the paramedics. “In the ambulance, his heart stopped beating, so they had to defibrillate him.”

“I feel happy that I intervened so rapidly. If nobody had done anything, he might have not lived. Thankfully, he’s doing very well now.”

Speaking of the CPR training he’s received through the ACT High School CPR Program in his physical education class, William says “As soon as I saw him collapse, my reflex was to revert back to the CPR that I learned at school.”

William’s teacher, Mr. Trahan agrees with him – “Being CPR trained, he was able to react with confidence and without hesitation.”

The ACT High School CPR Program was set up in Paul-Le-Jeune High School thanks to the support provided by the Government of Quebec and ACT’s health partners, AstraZeneca Canada, Pfizer Canada and Sanofi Canada.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is an award-winning, national charitable organization dedicated to establishing CPR and AED training programs in high schools across Canada. ACT raises funds to donate mannequins and teacher training to schools, and guides schools in program set-up and long-term sustainability. Over 3.2 million youth have been trained in CPR by their teachers through this lifesaving program to date.

Montreal students save teammate’s life with CPR & an AED

One evening in April, Jimmy, 17, and Malik, 16, were playing their weekly game of ball hockey, involving parents, students and other community members, in the gym of a local school in their Montreal neighbourhood.
As Malik was getting ready to leave the gym, he saw one of his teammates, Marc, 47, collapse.

“At first, I didn’t know what was going on, but very quickly we saw his face turn blue and we realized he wasn’t breathing” Malik says.

During that time, Jimmy was in the dressing room unaware of the situation. “My dad ran up to me and asked me to call 911,” he recalls. Jimmy then rushed to the gym to see what was happening. QuoteJimmyandMalik

“As soon as I saw Marc lying on the ground without any vital signs, I panicked. I got the urge to run away, but then I recalled the CPR training I received in high school and knew I needed to do something,” he says.

While the school custodian, Jean-Christophe, who is also the team coach, ran to get the school Automated External Defibrillator (AED), Jimmy and Malik took charge of the situation and quickly started CPR.

“The AED was very easy to use because it told us exactly what to do,” they say. “The instructions given by the AED were extremely helpful during the procedure,” acknowledges Malik.

The two boys continued following the instructions given by the defibrillator, alternating between compressions and defibrillation until the arrival of the paramedics and firefighters.

A week later, during their ball hockey practice, Jimmy and Malik found out that Marc was alive and well.

While Malik recognizes the AED as an essential lifesaving machine, Marc’s wife, Anne-Marie commends the two boys for saving her husband’s life.

“The paramedics told me that what Jimmy and Malik did was paramedic work that day. Thanks to the ACT training they received from their teacher Mrs. Gagnon, we still have my husband by our side. Without that initiative, he would have died,” she says.

“I could have never anticipated that moment, it all happened so quickly,” admits Jimmy. “Having the High School CPR training under my belt gave me the confidence I needed to know what to do and to know how to act. Without it, I wouldn’t have put myself in the midst of the action,” he adds.

The ACT High School CPR program was set up in École secondaire de la Pointe-aux-Trembles, Montreal in 2007 thanks to the support provided by the Government of Quebec. ACT’s health partners supporting the program in Montreal, throughout Quebec and across Canada are AstraZeneca Canada, Pfizer Canada and Sanofi Canada. They provide ACT’s sustaining funding and are committed to the Foundation’s national goal of promoting health and empowering Canadians to save lives.

The Advanced Coronary Treatment (ACT) Foundation is an award-winning, national charitable organization dedicated to establishing free CPR and AED training programs in high schools across Canada. ACT raises funds to donate mannequins and teacher training to schools, and guides schools in program set-up and long-term sustainability. Over 3.2 million youth have been trained in CPR by their teachers through this lifesaving program to date.